Pink Floyd: The Wall (encore!)

Holy shit, ‘Floyd fans – if you’ve never seen Pink Floyd: The Wall, now’s the time to take the pill; as the film is more than a video album, more than a rock operetta, more than the sticky makeout party known as Laser Floyd at the Science Center. Director Alan Parker takes classic-rock-giant Pink Floyd’s eleventh (and most contentious) studio album and adds dimension after visual dimension to its iconic composition, slowly revealing the plummeting and heartbreaking internal depths of The Wall’s unexplored stories.

Following young Pink through a childhood of turmoil and hostility, The Wall is a visually rich yet morally devoid bildungsroman of mounting anxiety, as Pink struggles for connection and expression in an uncaring, violent world. Written by Roger Waters, based on the life of rock ‘n roll’s arguable persephone Syd Barrett, and rife with psychedelia, the film hypnotizes us deeply into the psychological sub-terrains of a soul’s disconnection from society – in only the way Waters can be our Virgil. With animation by Gerald Scarfe that brings an interplanar breadth to this sludgy, woeful musical epic of postwar algos, Waters has crafted a crucial forewarning – perhaps now more relevant than ever – of the psychosis of a human kept behind a wall.

Dir. Alan Parker, 1983, 35mm, 95 min.