Homepage Feature

The Dog (8/14)

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8/14/2014 - 10:20PM

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & Frank Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

The Dog (8/11, 7:30pm)

thedog_480_309
8/11/2014 - 7:30PM

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & Frank Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

The Dog (8/10)

thedog2_480_309
8/10/2014 - 9PM

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & Frank Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

The Dog (8/9, 7:30pm)

thedog1_480_309
8/9/2014 - 7:30PM

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & Frank Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

Moebius (8/3)

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8/3/2014 - 10:15PM

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dir. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Moebius”!

Moebius (8/2)

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8/2/2014 - 7:30PM

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dir. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Moebius”!

Moebius (8/1)

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8/1/2014 - 7:30PM

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dir. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Moebius”!

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: Naughty Bits

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7/16/2014 - 10:30PM

Too hot for 16mm? Too sexy for the cinema? In our film collecting adventures, we’ve come across some gorgeous, strange, and yes, even sticky shorts that are as arousing as they are entertaining. Tonight, we’ll give you the sexual education your high school neglected, with an eyeful of awkward teens, boxing burlesque queens, animated cut-paper penises, feline fanciers and silly smut. Plus, as a special bonus, we’ll take a look at a one-of-a-kind 35mm reel of nudie scenes compiled by Hollywood projectionists of the 1960s — they saved all “the best parts” for us. Grab a hot, buttery grilled cheese on the back patio and settle in for a program sure to set your nether regions a-tingle. No hardcore, so bring a friend with delicate sensibilities and tell ‘em it’s the latest thing; if Travis Bickle had taken his date here, things would have turned out fine.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Naughty Bits!”

Jodorowsky's "The Dance of Reality" (7/15)

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7/15/2014 - 10:45PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

Jodorowsky's "The Dance of Reality" (7/14)

danceofreality_website4
7/14/2014 - 10PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

Jodorowsky's "The Dance of Reality" (7/13)

danceofreality_website3
7/13/2014 - 10PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

Jodorowsky's "The Dance of Reality" (7/12)

danceofreality_website2
7/12/2014 - 9:30PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

Jodorowsky's "The Dance of Reality" (7/11)

danceofreality_website1
7/11/2014 - 9:40PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/10, 10:20pm)

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7/10/2014 - 10:20PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/10, 5:00pm)

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7/10/2014 - 5PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/9, 9:50pm)

harddays1_480_309
7/9/2014 - 9:50PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/9, 7:30pm)

harddays3_480_309
7/9/2014 - 7:30PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/8, 9:50pm)

harddays2_480_309
7/8/2014 - 9:50PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/8, 7:30pm)

harddays1_480_309
7/8/2014 - 7:30PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/7, 9:50pm)

harddays2_480_309
7/7/2014 - 9:50PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/7, 7:30pm)

harddays3_480_309
7/7/2014 - 7:30PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/6, 9:45pm)

harddays1_480_309
7/6/2014 - 9:45PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/6, 7:30pm)

harddays2_480_309
7/6/2014 - 7:30PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/6, 5pm)

harddays3_480_309
7/6/2014 - 5PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

HEAVY MIDNITES: Patrick Swayze in "Steel Dawn" ("World Gone Wild" author David J. Moore in person!)

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7/5/2014 - MIDNITE

Come welcome author/longtime Cinefamily friend David J. Moore, as he stops by to celebrate the release of his mammoth new book “World Gone Wild: A Survivor’s Guide to Post-Apocalyptic Movies”. He’s bringing along a doozy of a screening: Patrick Swayze’s sand-swept actioner Steel Dawn. Released while Dirty Dancing was still in theaters and while Thunderdome was still on our minds, this sci-fi update of Shane crawls through the ruins of nuclear war to bring you a dusty landscape of unearthly beauty in a world struggling against both the forces of nature and the evil of mankind. It opens with Swayze standing on his head in the middle of a desert, and only gets weirder from there as he wanders the wasteland slashing through mutants and madmen in order to carve a future with his sword. It’s a sparse, tense affair cemented by committed performances by Swayze and his real-life wife Lisa Niemi, tightly directed by frequent Cannon Films collaborator Lance Hool (Missing in Action 2) and stacked with an army of classic “That Guys”: Anthony Zerbe, Brion James, Arnold Vosloo and American Ninja’s John Fujioka!
Dir. Lance Hool, 1987, 35mm, 100 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Steel Dawn”!

A Hard Day's Night (7/5, 9:45pm)

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7/5/2014 - 9:45PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/5, 7:30pm)

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7/5/2014 - 7:30PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

A Hard Day's Night (7/5, 5:15pm)

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7/5/2014 - 5:15PM

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

The Dance of Reality (7/2)

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7/2/2014 - 10:45PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

The Dance of Reality (7/1, 10:40pm)

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7/1/2014 - 10:40PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

The Dance of Reality (7/1, 7:30pm)

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7/1/2014 - 7:30PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

The Dance of Reality (6/30)

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6/30/2014 - 11:15PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

GREG PROOPS FILM CLUB: The Man Who Would Be King

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6/30/2014 - 7:30PM

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for John Huston’s stirring ‘70s Rudyard Kipling epic. Greg sez: “The Man Who Would be King plays like a smashing old-time movie, as Huston originally wanted to make it in the ‘40s with Gable and Bogart. Sean Connery and Michael Caine radiate crackling chemistry, as they fight the elements, ravines, avalanches, the natives, fate, plus their own greed and egos. This adventure buddy movie is about love: the boys’ love for each other, the love of glory, and our love for them — even though we know they’re shady, nefarious scoundrels. Connery is the sexiest and most charismatic of actors, with an unlimited capacity for accepting adoration that sets just the right tone in the role of the king-ish Danny. Caine is skill itself as the canny, crafty cockney Peachy trying to work a sticky situation into a fortune, if they can survive the very wrath of the gods to bring back the treasure hidden by Alexander the Great. Butch Cassidy in the Hindu Kush. Thelma and Louise on a mule with Martini rifles. Good, old-fashioned movie racism and high adventure.”
Dir. John Huston, 1975, 35mm, 123 min.

Q: Does Greg talk over the movies, like the Benson Interruption?
A: No. It is a recording of his podcast, followed by a screening of the film.

Watch the trailer for “The Man Who Would Be King”!

The Dance of Reality (6/29)

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6/29/2014 - 4PM

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

The Dance of Reality (6/28)

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6/28/2014 - MIDNITE

NOTE: doors will open for this event at 12:00am, showtime at 12:30am.

The visionary behind the now-timeless El Topo and The Holy Mountain returns with his first cinematic work in over two decades, and it couldn’t be a more heartfelt journey. Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to strange autobiography, as 1989’s Santa Sangre can attest, but The Dance of Reality goes many surreal steps further into the artist’s childhood. Filmed in Jodorowsky’s sleepy coastal Chilean home town of Tocopilla, it charts the upbringing of young Ale, clad in flowing Goldilocks mane, at once smothered by an operatic mother and tormented by an ex-circus performer father, who wishes his little one would become a “real man.” All manner of metaphorical, mythological, political and poetic machinations swirl around the boy, as Jodorowsky (appearing as the omniscient narrator) reflects on a reality that is not objective, but rather a “dance” created by our own imaginations. It’s been long enough since the title card “An Alejandro Jodorowsky Film” has newly appeared in movie houses that our fearless pioneer, mindful that this might be his final work, infuses the Dance with enough sincere, personal, devastating and lasting imagery to be truly worthy of that sentiment.
Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Dance of Reality”, visit the top of this series page!

FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS: The Blob (1988, director Chuck Russell in person!)

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6/27/2014 - MIDNITE

CO-PRESENTED BY SHOCK TILL YOU DROP

Schedule permitting, director Chuck Russell in person! In the pristine wake of great atomic-era horror remakes (Carpenter’s The Thing, Cronenberg’s The Fly) came the lesser celebrated but no less delightful 1988 remake of The Blob. Filtered through the mad minds of screenwriter Frank “Shawshank Redemption” Darabont and director Chuck Russell (the team also responsible for the superior Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors), the ‘50s schlockfest Blob morphed into a state-of the-art ‘80s gore FX-travaganza that still has to power to shock and turn stomachs more than 25 years on. Starring bad-boy Kevin Dillon (Entourage) and the seemingly ageless Shawnee Smith as small town teens on the run from the titular amorphous monster, this fast-paced, gloopy gross-out surprises with its ability to endlessly entertain, and to escalate the madness until the pink stuff is oozing from your shattered skull. Gear up with us for a gelatinous good time in 35mm!
Dir. Chuck Russell, 1988, 35mm, 95 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “The Blob”!

VIDEO NIGHTS: Cards of Death (U.S. premiere, filmmaker in person!)

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6/21/2014 - 10:30PM

A sneak peek at the first release from BLEEDING SKULL! VIDEO — the new joint venture between Mondo and the peerless movie review site Bleeding Skull. Plus, filmmaker in person! Shadows stalk the night. Some belong to desperate men in hobo masks, others to knife-wielding New Wave dominatrixes, all cast against the urine-soaked asphalt by the throbbing pulse of sex-colored neon and remorseless gunfire. Unseen since its brief Japanese-only VHS release, this slasher holy grail is a celebration of mankind’s basest sins: cocaine, masochism, gambling, alcoholism and worse are paraded like courtroom evidence in a trial against the human race. The answer to “Who’s to blame?” is shocking: W.G. MacMillan, the hard-times tough guy from Romero’s The Crazies and Eastwood’s The Enforcer who’s had a long, fruitful career in TV. This makes MacMillan a major anomaly in camcorder horror: a seasoned Hollywood professional. Yet he attacked this project with such visceral gusto that you’d assume he’d bubbled up from the sewer, rather than the bright lights of Movieland USA. Goddamn it, they should hand out medals for that kind of thing. Mr. MacMillan, we salute you.
Dir. W. G. MacMillan, 1986, analog presentation, approx. 90 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Cards of Death”!
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HEAVY MIDNITES: Pump Up The Volume (archival 35mm print, filmmaker Allan Moyle in person!)

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6/20/2014 - MIDNITE

Has an actor had a better on-screen run at conveying adolescent alienation than Christian Slater? In a three year span, he was front-and-center in the biting satire Heathers, the skate dog classic Gleaming the Cube and the rebellious howl of Pump Up The Volume. That’s one heck of a resume to rack up before your 21st birthday, eh? In Volume he’s perfectly cast as a rebel with a cause, a shy high schooler by day but a cynical, perceptive and totally uncensored pirate radio icon at night, unafraid to tell the hard truth and filling the airwaves with fiercely funny monologues on sex, love and rock ‘n roll. He’s witty and raw — but will his powerful voice inspire unity or tear the community apart? Helming his first feature since the 1980 teen queen punk epic Times Square, writer/director Allan Moyle (Empire Records) again shows his skill with disaffected, music-obsessed youth, carefully shaping urgent true-to-life emotion both timely and timeless. Powered by a seminal alt-rock soundtrack and rarely theatrically screened, Pump Up The Volume demands to be played loud. Filmmaker Allan Moyle in person, plus DJs Carlos & Azul Niño will be here to spin tunes before the show!
Dir. Allan Moyle, 1990, 35mm, 105 min. (Print courtesy of UCLA Film & Television Archive)

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Pump Up The Volume”!

Seagalogy: A Steven Seagal Movie Marathon (co-hosted by Vern!)

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6/14/2014 - 5PM

Co-presented by AIN’T IT COOL NEWS

ORDER OF FILMS (start times VERY approximate):
1) Hard To Kill – approx. 5:15pm
2) Under Siege 2: Dark Territory – approx. 7:30pm
3) Out For Justice – approx. 10:00pm
4) On Deadly Ground – approx. midnight

Steven Seagal: aikido instructor, environmental activist and movie star. He writes, directs, plays blues guitar, creates energy drinks and is a reserve deputy sheriff. He might be an authority on antique samurai swords, and may have even killed for the CIA. For three decades he’s left an indelible and deeply personal mark on action cinema, igniting screens with his unique blend of machismo and mysticism. And now, those fist-pumping hits are coming to Cinefamily for a take-no-prisoners, one-day-only 35mm blowout!

But that’s not all: we’re flying in cinematic outlaw/bestselling author/legendary film scholar Vern (the man who literally wrote the book on Seagalogy) for his FIRST-EVER public appearance to help better explain the man, the myth and the magic behind your favorite dealer of swift, lethal moves. Plus we’ll have special guests (like regular Seagal film editor Robert Perreti), vintage trailers and more fun ‘n games than should legally be allowed, all to celebrate Heavy Midnites’ 2nd anniversary!

HARD TO KILL
In the pulse-pounding box office hit that debuted his iconic ponytail, Seagal is Mason Storm, an honest cop gunned down and left for dead, but secretly plotting his revenge while in a seven-year coma. Now he must avenge his murdered wife, reconnect with his son and keep his red hot nurse (Kelly LeBrock, the beauty from Weird Science and Seagal’s then-real-life spouse) safe from the corrupt killers biting at their heels. One of Seagal’s most purely enjoyable flicks, Hard to Kill engaged a generation of teenage popcorn munchers, VHS enthusiasts and cable fanatics, cementing Seagal’s screen appeal while furthering his legend. It’s a guaranteed good time, and you can take that to the bank — the blood bank!
Dir. Bruce Malmuth, 1990, 35mm, 96 min.

UNDER SIEGE 2: DARK TERRITORY
Screenwriter Richard Hatem in person. America’s favorite bone-breaking, neck-snapping chef is off the boat, on vacation and taking his maladjusted teen niece (Katherine Heigl…what?!) cross-country by rail. The film’s powerfully concise explanation: “Would you fly if your parents just died in a plane crash?” The secret sleeper in the pantheon of Seagal classics, Under Siege 2 proves the master’s only as good as the villains he’s up against. And our ponytailed hero isn’t just up against your average group of computer hacking hijackers here; Seagal goes fist-to-fist with a wild assortment of disparate character actors: monologist Eric Bogosian(!), Twin Peaks’ Everett McGill, Pulp Fiction’s Peter Greene, Breaking Bad’s Jonathan Banks, along with other disposable mercenaries and buff badasses. The explosive Casey Ryback saga charges ahead like an unstoppable locomotive of non-stop entertainment!
Dir. Geoff Murphy, 1995, 35mm, 100 min.

OUT FOR JUSTICE
Editor Robert A. Ferretti in person. Look, we all know being a cop’s a dirty job, but somebody’s got to take out the garbage. In the acknowledged masterpiece of Seagal’s filmography, director John Flynn (Rolling Thunder) and screenwriter David Lee Henry (straight off Road House) perfect the actor’s ‘90s template with elegant simplicity, showcasing the star’s brutal physical ability and strong code of honor. When a police officer is savagely gunned down in front of his family, his partner/best friend Gino (Seagal) goes on the hunt for the psychotic cokehound Richie (William Forsythe, foaming at the mouth and chewing scenery with blithe recklessness.) Seagal gets to speak guido, shoot a guy’s leg completely off with a shotgun, and, most importantly, kick a ton of butt while turning the neighborhood into a war zone, tearing through armies of goons, street urchins and made men while growling bon mots like “I’m gonna cut off his head and piss down his throat.” Skulls will be cracked, bones will be broken and glass will be shattered in this top-tier beat-em-up!
Dir. John Flynn, 1991, 35mm, 91 min. (Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive)

ON DEADLY GROUND
We’re flying in a rare U.K. 35mm print just for this one show only of the defining Seagal masterwork! Editor Robert A. Ferretti in person. The capper to our day of Seagal: the most Seagal of them all! Steven’s directorial debut showcases the star’s then-newly-discovered environmentalism, his blossoming interest in Native American culture and the best bar room brawl in all of Seagalogy. Our hero is Forrest Taft, “patron saint of the impossible,” an expert in putting out oil rig fires who must battle an evil corporation to save Alaska and its indigenous people. He wears a fringed jacket, goes on an Inuit vision quest and totally hates pollution. As Vern wrote in his epic tome, “before this movie, he was a popular action star, like so many others. Only now did he become Steven fucking Seagal.” But it’s not just a one man show, for On Deadly Ground features great performances by a truly embarrassed Michael Caine, Joan Chen as an Eskimo love interest, R. Lee Ermey and Billy Bob Thornton as vicious mercenaries and Scrubs star John C. McGinley as a henchman named MacGruder. Vern sums it up eloquently: “you can’t understand Seagal if you haven’t seen On Deadly Ground.”
Dir. Steven Seagal, 1994, 35mm, 101 min.

Friday The 13th: A "Tommy Jarvis" Triple Feature (Pt. 6 director Tom McLoughlin in person!)

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6/13/2014 - 7:30PM

Part VI: Jason Lives – 7:30pm (director Tom McLoughlin in person, plus special back patio surprise after the film!)
Part V: A New Beginning – approx. 10:00pm
Part IV: The Final Chapter – approx. 11:45pm

We wouldn’t leave you hanging on Friday the 13th, would we? At the blackest core of the Friday the 13th saga (now in its fourth decade, wow!), there stands a storyline that still fascinates and boggles us: the famed “Tommy Jarvis trilogy”. Part IV: The Final Chapter first introduced the character of a plucky young horror aficionado who happened to outwit Master Voorhees with a machete to the rotten skull — but, in the aftermath of more and more dead bodies, had Tommy succumbed to murderous madness himself, or was Jason still on the scene, dispatching the sweet touch of death onto any copulating teen, blotto’d backwoods bystander or other whacko in his path? One of the great things about this trilogy, aside from the gaggle of gleeful gore, is that, despite the obvious F13 formula (teens + Jason = death, and lots of it), each entry has its own unique flavor, thanks to the distinctive directorial visions of Joseph Zito, Danny Steinmann and Tom McLoughlin. Travel back in time with us as we trace Tommy’s Proustian odyssey in reverse, from adulthood back into innocent prepubescence — all in one sitting, all on glorious 35mm!
Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives Dir. Tom McLoughlin, 1986, 35mm, 87 min.
Friday The 13th Part V: A New Beginning Dir. Danny Steinmann, 1985, 35mm, 92 min.
Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter Dir. Joseph Zito, 1984, 35mm, 91 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for the “Tommy Jarvis Trilogy”!

DOUG BENSON MOVIE INTERRUPTION: Noah

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6/12/2014 - 7:30PM

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Paul F. Tompkins to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.
Dir. Darren Aronofsky, 2014, DCP, 139 min.

Watch the trailer for “Noah”!
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MEMBERS-ONLY: 22 Jump Street (sneak preview, filmmakers in person!)

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6/11/2014 - 10PM

Cinefamily pals Phil Lord and Chris Miller have consistently brought a fresh irreverence to their entire filmography in the “big studio” milieu. Whether it’s for children of all ages (Cloudy With A Chance of Meatballs, The Lego Movie) or for the goofy child within (21 Jump Street), this duo knows how to craft shining pop gems that remain totally fresh years on. Join Phil and Chris for a special screening of their latest, before it drops on June 13th! DJ Alec Hodgman (KXLU’s “A Fistful Of Vinyl”) will be here to spin tunes before the show!
Dirs. Phil Lord & Chris Miller, 2014, DCP, 112 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

If this is the kind of event you want more of in your life, sign up for a CINEFAMILY MEMBERSHIP!

Watch the trailer for “22 Jump Street”!
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The Hourglass Sanatorium (6/11)

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6/11/2014 - 7:30PM

“An adult ‘Alice in Wonderland’…an exploration of waking and dreaming, without the relief of an objective eye to distance the trip.” — The Quietus

As the roving camera enters deeper and deeper into a dilapidated labyrinth of nightmare sets on par with The Shining’s Overlook Hotel for sheer surreal splendor, Wojciech Has’s The Hourglass Sanatorium unfolds as a stunning, visionary reflection on the nature of time — one which makes Has’s previous Möbius-strip fairytale The Saragossa Manuscript look straightforward by comparison. Joseph (veteran Polish actor Jan Nowicki), woken by a blind Charon-like conductor on an uncomfortably evocative train full of Jews, is visiting his father in a strange, magnificently decrepit sanatorium. Once a bevy of scifi-ish timeslips start occurring, all conventional notions of linearity are out the window, in favour of an unsettling picaresque through memory and fantasy. This bewildering purgatory is replete with an invisible bureaucracy that arrests Joseph for his dreams, copious skulls, cobwebs, semi-sentient clockwork mannequins and women in various states of undress. A tour de force of atmospherics and winner of the ‘73 Jury Prize at Cannes, Hourglass mingles allegory, metaphor, the horror of the Shoah and the passing of a particular form of Jewish European culture, to produce a stunning head-trip of a movie. DJ Jon Puppo (KXLU’s “A Fistful Of Vinyl”) will be here to spin tunes before the show!
Dir. Wojciech Jerzy Has, 1973, DCP, 124 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer from “The Hourglass Sanatorium”!

Who Can Kill A Child? (ultra-rare 35mm screening, 6/8)

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6/8/2014 - 10:30PM

Co-presented by Spectrevision

There are films that break taboos in order to bring society into a new, freer era — and then there are wildly entertaining films like 1976’s Who Can Kill A Child?, which busts the taboo of putting youngsters in extreme peril, gleefully providing a crimson cavalcade of murderous rugrats and tots getting whacked. It’s kindertrauma gold, as Spanish director Narciso Ibáñez Serrador (The House That Screamed) brings a vacationing couple to a pleasant-looking resort island, only to have them find that all the adults on the island have been slaughtered by their bloodthirsty broods — and that the only way out is to start shooting. There’s some high-minded stuff at the beginning about cosmic retribution for the untold millions of kids killed during wartime, but really, this is a niftily crafted exploitation gem that’s out to getcha, bolstered by a raft of haunting, creepy child performances. It’s all in the eyes… Our screenings of the film come from the only known remaining Spanish 35mm print!
Dir. Narciso Ibáñez Serrador, 1976, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Who Can Kill A Child?”!

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB - Xtian Xperiments: The Films of Rolf Forsberg

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6/8/2014 - 7:30PM

Meet Christian experimental cinema’s “king of kings,” Rolf Forsberg. In the ‘60s and ‘70s, major American religious organizations regularly sponsored 16mm films made for public outreach and Sunday meetings alike, hoping to engage both the spiritual and the secular. No one did it like Forsberg, who, as a student of all faiths, combined a live theater background with a passion for Fellini and Bergman to create provocatively unusual shorts. Parable (1964) reimagines the son of God as a circus clown, shocking audiences and the Protestant clergy at the World’s Fair. Stalked (1968) masterfully employs metaphor, voice-over, haunting close-ups and plenty of non-actors to depict a spiritual crisis of wax museums, desolate airports and flaming calliopes. A precursor to Silent Running, the post-apocalyptic environmentalism of Ark (1970) resonates to this day. These are not the films you’d expect to see at church; don your Sunday best for an evening of ecumenical ephemera that taps into a universal cinematic truth. Rolf Forsberg will join us in person for a career-spanning Q&A and a screening of his greatest shorts from original 16mm prints, courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive!

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Xtian Xperiments: The Films of Rolf Forsberg!

The Cinema of Unarius (feat. The Arrival, 6/8)

unarius_arrival2_website
6/8/2014 - 5PM

Psychedelic viewing for many a late-night cable fan, it’s an encore of Unarius’ greatest filmic achievement: the outsider interstellar fantasia The Arrival (1978) — plus, we’ll also screen our custom half-hour mix of Unarius video productions throughout the decades! Artists working within the Unarian worldview certainly know how to dream big, for one of the brotherhood’s core aims is to form a cosmic confederation with benevolent “Space Brothers.” And of all the DIY films made by American alternative cultures over the decades, none are as epicly ambitious and as earnestly effective as The Arrival. Both a “documentary” of a Unariun’s channeled past-life incarnation and a riveting homemade space opera (complete with ingenious hyper-colored analog SFX that evoke James Whitney on planet Xanadu), the film follows an aborigine, who, after being contacted by an immense Rubik’s Cube full of advanced telepathic beings, overcomes his psychic amnesia, working through his past life as a genocidal spaceship commander. This impassioned and meticulously designed origin story, the largest-scale production of Unarius’ oeuvre, has a spiritual agenda to match Jodorowsky’s, with a startling visual aesthetic halfway between Lynch and an ABBA music video.

Watch an excerpt from “The Arrival”!

Who Can Kill A Child? (ultra-rare 35mm screening, 6/7)

whocankillachild_website1
6/7/2014 - 10:15PM

Co-presented by Spectrevision

There are films that break taboos in order to bring society into a new, freer era — and then there are wildly entertaining films like 1976’s Who Can Kill A Child?, which busts the taboo of putting youngsters in extreme peril, gleefully providing a crimson cavalcade of murderous rugrats and tots getting whacked. It’s kindertrauma gold, as Spanish director Narciso Ibáñez Serrador (The House That Screamed) brings a vacationing couple to a pleasant-looking resort island, only to have them find that all the adults on the island have been slaughtered by their bloodthirsty broods — and that the only way out is to start shooting. There’s some high-minded stuff at the beginning about cosmic retribution for the untold millions of kids killed during wartime, but really, this is a niftily crafted exploitation gem that’s out to getcha, bolstered by a raft of haunting, creepy child performances. It’s all in the eyes… Our screenings of the film come from the only known remaining Spanish 35mm print!
Dir. Narciso Ibáñez Serrador, 1976, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Who Can Kill A Child?”!

The Cinema of Unarius (feat. The Arrival, 6/7)

unarius_arrival_website
6/7/2014 - 8PM

Psychedelic viewing for many a late-night cable fan, it’s an encore of Unarius’ greatest filmic achievement: the outsider interstellar fantasia The Arrival (1978) — plus, we’ll also screen our custom half-hour mix of Unarius video productions throughout the decades! Artists working within the Unarian worldview certainly know how to dream big, for one of the brotherhood’s core aims is to form a cosmic confederation with benevolent “Space Brothers.” And of all the DIY films made by American alternative cultures over the decades, none are as epicly ambitious and as earnestly effective as The Arrival. Both a “documentary” of a Unariun’s channeled past-life incarnation and a riveting homemade space opera (complete with ingenious hyper-colored analog SFX that evoke James Whitney on planet Xanadu), the film follows an aborigine, who, after being contacted by an immense Rubik’s Cube full of advanced telepathic beings, overcomes his psychic amnesia, working through his past life as a genocidal spaceship commander. This impassioned and meticulously designed origin story, the largest-scale production of Unarius’ oeuvre, has a spiritual agenda to match Jodorowsky’s, with a startling visual aesthetic halfway between Lynch and an ABBA music video.

Watch an excerpt from “The Arrival”!

THE SILENT TREATMENT: Joan Crawford in "Our Modern Maidens"

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6/7/2014 - 5:30PM

Ever wonder how a jitterbug-crazy Texan girl could petrify into the coat-hanger-wielding monster of Mommie Dearest? Step one: reach explosive box-office stardom as a stunning Silent Siren. Joan Crawford is remembered in large part for the infamous actions that bought her a permanent place in pop culture, but in 1929’s Our Modern Maidens, Crawford was simply a gorgeous gal with a penchant for partying and causing love troubles. Made on the heels of Our Dancing Daughters (the film which catapulted Crawford to fame and eventual fortune), Maidens is a smart, flashy film that teams up our lady with Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., who at the time was Crawford’s real-life paramour. Joan certainly ruffled feathers and titillated swarms of movie-goers with this tempestuous, sexy Pre-Code treat, featuring quite risqué subject matter for the times — including an out-of-wedlock pregnancy! A total Twenties smash hit, Our Modern Maidens marked Crawford’s final silent performance.
Dir. Jack Conway, 1929, 35mm, 76 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Our Modern Maidens”!
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HEAVY MIDNITES: Videodrome

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6/6/2014 - MIDNITE

In writer/director David Cronenberg’s visionary masterpiece, reality is television, television is reality, Blondie’s Debbie Harry is incendiary and James Woods is freakier than ever. It’s dangerous, exciting and remarkably alive. And more than that, it’s nearly unfathomable that a major Hollywood studio would ever dare release something so heroically audacious. Eternal thanks, Universal — any chance we’ll get a theme park ride? But no joke, Videodrome is essential midnight movie brain fuel: it thrills, titillates and enlightens. Prophetic sci-fi spirituality perfectly melds with the filmmaker’s trademark obsessions, the entire cast is game for outrageous opportunities, and the flick blazes along at a lightning clip. Plus, there’s ultra-gooey Rick Baker effects (a tape-eating abdominal vagina!), a hypnotic Howard Shore synth-and-string score, plenty of kinky sex possibilities, and more than enough provocative ideas/hyper-stimulated video hallucinations to totally scorch your melon. It’s no surprise that Andy Warhol called it a Clockwork Orange for the ‘80s.
Dir. David Cronenberg, 1982, 35mm, 87 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Videodrome”! WARNING: this one’s NSFW.

The Cinema of Unarius (feat. The Arrival, 6/6)

unarius_arrival2_website
6/6/2014 - 9:50PM

Psychedelic viewing for many a late-night cable fan, it’s an encore of Unarius’ greatest filmic achievement: the outsider interstellar fantasia The Arrival (1978) — plus, we’ll also screen our custom half-hour mix of Unarius video productions throughout the decades! Artists working within the Unarian worldview certainly know how to dream big, for one of the brotherhood’s core aims is to form a cosmic confederation with benevolent “Space Brothers.” And of all the DIY films made by American alternative cultures over the decades, none are as epicly ambitious and as earnestly effective as The Arrival. Both a “documentary” of a Unariun’s channeled past-life incarnation and a riveting homemade space opera (complete with ingenious hyper-colored analog SFX that evoke James Whitney on planet Xanadu), the film follows an aborigine, who, after being contacted by an immense Rubik’s Cube full of advanced telepathic beings, overcomes his psychic amnesia, working through his past life as a genocidal spaceship commander. This impassioned and meticulously designed origin story, the largest-scale production of Unarius’ oeuvre, has a spiritual agenda to match Jodorowsky’s, with a startling visual aesthetic halfway between Lynch and an ABBA music video.

Watch an excerpt from “The Arrival”!

SCIENCE ON SCREEN: Watermark (plus Q&A w/ Connor Everts, Southern California Watershed Alliance!)

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6/6/2014 - 7:30PM

“[E]legant, eye-widening 5K ultra-high-definition video visuals that astonish by showing us the world in a particularly immersive way.” — Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

Q&A to follow with Connor Everts, co-chair of the Southern California Watershed Alliance! The awe-inspiring, challenging, delicate, destructive and essential aspects of water is chronicled in this sensorially sweeping documentary tone poem, one akin to Baraka and Koyaanisqatsi in its visual beauty. Renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky and filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal first teamed for one of the most intense docs of the last decade: 2006’s Manufactured Landscapes, which followed Burtynsky photographing civilization’s materials and debris — quarries, recycling yards, factories, mines and dams. The same team joins once again to bring together diverse stories from around the globe: how we’re drawn to water, what we learn from it, how we use it and the consequences of that use. Soaring aerial perspectives show us massive floating abalone farms off China’s coast; the construction site of the world’s biggest arch dam; the barren delta where the Colorado River no longer reaches the ocean; the U.S. Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach; the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, where thirty million people gather for a sacred Ganges bath. With Watermark, the viewer is immersed in a magnificent force of nature that we all take for granted — until it’s gone.
Dirs. Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Watermark”!

UP FROM THE DEPTHS: Dynamite Chicken

dynamitechicken_website2
6/5/2014 - 10PM

Waaaay before the advent of YouTube, what did denizens of the ‘70s counterculture do when they wanted to watch a random barrage of amazing, funny and bizarro twaddle? Why, they clopped on down to the late-night moviehouse to catch Dynamite Chicken: a non-stop omnibus of silly, stick-it-to-the-man mayhem, interspersed with cameos (both staged and culled from archival footage) by John & Yoko, Leonard Cohen, Lenny Bruce, Michael O’Donoghue, Jimi Hendrix, Eric Dolphy, Tuli Kupferberg of the Fugs, Sha-Na-Na (gulp!), Fred Willard, B.B. King, Allen Ginsberg, Malcolm X, Andy Warhol, the Velvet Underground and much more. Lensed in ‘69, this is a prime time capsule of Vietnam-era yuks on the heavy-duty subjects of war, patriotism, narcotics, the fuzz, feminism — oh, and did we mention that the bedrock of it all is Richard Pryor? Our main man does about 10 minutes’ worth of great material delivered straight into the camera, interspersed throughout the sketch comedy schtick and irreverent clowning.
Dir. Ernest Pintoff, 1971, 35mm, 76 min.

Watch the trailer for “Dynamite Chicken”!

Jodorowsky's Dune (6/4)

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6/4/2014 - 10PM

One of the greatest films never made, by one of underground cinema’s greatest talents of the 20th century, finally comes to light in this documentary look at Alejandro Jodorowsky’s long-gestated, but never filmed version of Frank Herbert’s mammoth sci-fi epic Dune. Having achieved immortal arthouse/midnight movie status in the early Seventies with El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky next attempted to tackle the “unfilmable” Dune universe, spending several years and millions of dollars in pre-production, only to have the project cancelled right as the final pieces of funding were to have come. No matter that an insanely cool international cast (Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, Euro transsexual pop star Amanda Lear) had been assembled, or that a brain-breaking design team (with artists like H.R. Giger and comic book genius Moebius) had toiled for endless months — for this ultimate filmic head-trip was never truly meant to be. Equal parts comprehensive overview of every phase of the project and exploration of Jodorowsky’s rollercoaster multimedia career, Jorodowsky’s Dune is the fascinating journey film fans have been clamoring for.
Dir. Frank Pavich, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Jodorowsky’s Dune”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Cinema of Unarius (feat. The Arrival, 6/4)

unarius_arrival_website
6/4/2014 - 7:30PM

Psychedelic viewing for many a late-night cable fan, it’s an encore of Unarius’ greatest filmic achievement: the outsider interstellar fantasia The Arrival (1978) — plus, we’ll also screen our custom half-hour mix of Unarius video productions throughout the decades! Artists working within the Unarian worldview certainly know how to dream big, for one of the brotherhood’s core aims is to form a cosmic confederation with benevolent “Space Brothers.” And of all the DIY films made by American alternative cultures over the decades, none are as epicly ambitious and as earnestly effective as The Arrival. Both a “documentary” of a Unariun’s channeled past-life incarnation and a riveting homemade space opera (complete with ingenious hyper-colored analog SFX that evoke James Whitney on planet Xanadu), the film follows an aborigine, who, after being contacted by an immense Rubik’s Cube full of advanced telepathic beings, overcomes his psychic amnesia, working through his past life as a genocidal spaceship commander. This impassioned and meticulously designed origin story, the largest-scale production of Unarius’ oeuvre, has a spiritual agenda to match Jodorowsky’s, with a startling visual aesthetic halfway between Lynch and an ABBA music video.

Watch an excerpt from “The Arrival”!

VIDEO NIGHTS: Ronny Camaro and Seven Angry Women (filmmaker/star in person!)

ronniecamaro_website
5/31/2014 - MIDNITE

When you dig up an unknown 99-cent-bin movie that lists the same person as writer, director and star, you’re guaranteed to strike gold — and once we snared this shiny nugget, we jumped for joy like toothless prospectors in the 1880s. Seriously, if a scientist cabal were to steal a baby and feed him nothing for the next 30 years but Birth of a Nation and Deuce Bigalow, you wouldn’t get a protag half as shocking as Ronny Camaro. Ronnie and his best bud really want to get their own place, so they hatch a foolproof scheme: 1) rub armpit and ball sweat all over each others’ bodies to attract women; 2) sleep with rich women who’ll give them money in return for being so good at fucking; 3) use said money to live the dude lifestyle. Between the random scenes shot on green-screen, the endless O.J. and Monica Lewinsky jokes, the use of black/brown/gayface, and the twist ending (which left us convinced that Tim & Eric and David Lynch all teamed up for it after a dose of joint brain damage), Ronny Camaro will leave you perma-changed. Writer/director/star Bo Linton in person!
Dir. Bo Linton, 2003, digital presentation.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Ronny Camaero and Seven Angry Women”!

FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS: Sleepaway Camp (Blu-Ray release party, cast members in person!)

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5/30/2014 - MIDNITE

Co-presented by SCREAM FACTORY and FANGORIA

“Of Felissa Rose…she was only fourteen at the time, but you’d be hard-pressed to find a better performance of a shy, bullied and kinda sad teenage girl anywhere. Those death glares she gives the bitchy prissies…classic.” — Andrew Thompson, Legless Corpse

Join us for a special 35mm screening, in celebration of Scream Factory’s brand-new Blu-Ray release hitting the streets on 5/27. Plus, co-stars Felissa Rose and Jonathan Tiersten in person! Next to Friday The 13th and The Burning, Sleepaway Camp completes the holy trinity of primary-source summer camp slashers. While Robert Hiltzik’s shocktastic enforcer may have been the latecomer of the group, it benefits from its elders’ wisdom by giving you exactly what you want from the subgenre: scummy dudes, jiggling girls, and a touch football field’s worth of sanguinary wreckage. From the tight shorts and half-shirts amongst nearly all of the cast, to the sleazy, voyeuristic camera evoking ‘70s De Palma by way of Meatballs, this is grimy, time-honored viewing. But nothing, and we do mean nothing, can prepare you for the jaw-dropping finale: an iconic twist-ending that loses absolutely none of its horrifying impact even after multiple viewings. Take that, M. Night Shyamalan!
Dir. Robert Hiltzik, 1983, 35mm, 88 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Sleepaway Camp”!

UP FROM THE DEPTHS: Death Bed - The Bed That Eats (filmmaker George Barry in person!)

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5/29/2014 - 10:15PM

Schedule permitting, filmmaker George Barry in person! Just when you thought you’d seen it all — murderous houseplants, elevators, computers, even tomatoes — along comes Death Bed. Immortalized by comedian Patton Oswalt in an evocative on-stage rant, this highly amusing bit of gothic surrealism takes place primarily within a stone crypt, where the only remaining piece of a demonic house sits in waiting for horny young thrillseekers to stumble upon it before digesting them whole. Though most obviously “horror”, Death Bed also fits snugly within outré experimental conventions — in particular, director George Barry eschews rational plotting and dialogue exposition in favor of whimsical perversity along the lines of James Broughton, whose memorable ’68 underground short The Bed must’ve been a strong influence. Never given a chance theatrically after its lengthy ‘70s post-production, Death Bed languished in the vaults after American distribution plans went belly up and a possible British distributor took off with a pirated copy. Fortunately for horror fans, Death Bed has finally emerged from its resting place, and onto Cult Epics’ brand-new Blu-Ray release. Come celebrate the occasion by letting Death Bed gurgle its way into your black, black heart.
Dir. George Barry, 1977, HD presentation, 80 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Death Bed: The Bed That Eats”!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Technicolor Toons (presented by Jerry Beck!)

jerrybeck_technicolor_website
5/29/2014 - 7:30PM

With the total marginalization of film just on the horizon, there’s never been a better time to celebrate the greatest film stock of all: Technicolor, the cream-of-the-crop chemical film process requiring three separate negatives to create its vivid images. And, unlike other film stocks, Tech’s colors never faded. We’ve dug up a whole program of diverse classic cartoons with only one thing in common — each is a vintage film print struck in the original three-strip Tech process. Join animation historian (and longtime Cinefamily friend) Jerry Beck for an entire buffet of 35mm Technicolor cartoons from the ‘30s, ‘40s and ‘50s. Sadly, Technicolor’s dye-transfer process, used during the golden age of Hollywood, stopped due to costs in 1974. Luckily, prints still exist — but they’re getting scarce. This is going to be one helluva show, with Color Rhapsodies, Terrytoons and Noveltoons galore.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Technicolor Toons”!

Jodorowsky's Dune (5/27)

jodorowskysdune_website
5/27/2014 - 10PM

One of the greatest films never made, by one of underground cinema’s greatest talents of the 20th century, finally comes to light in this documentary look at Alejandro Jodorowsky’s long-gestated, but never filmed version of Frank Herbert’s mammoth sci-fi epic Dune. Having achieved immortal arthouse/midnight movie status in the early Seventies with El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky next attempted to tackle the “unfilmable” Dune universe, spending several years and millions of dollars in pre-production, only to have the project cancelled right as the final pieces of funding were to have come. No matter that an insanely cool international cast (Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, Euro transsexual pop star Amanda Lear) had been assembled, or that a brain-breaking design team (with artists like H.R. Giger and comic book genius Moebius) had toiled for endless months — for this ultimate filmic head-trip was never truly meant to be. Equal parts comprehensive overview of every phase of the project and exploration of Jodorowsky’s rollercoaster multimedia career, Jorodowsky’s Dune is the fascinating journey film fans have been clamoring for.
Dir. Frank Pavich, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Jodorowsky’s Dune”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Five Minutes Game: Memorial Day '14 Edition

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5/26/2014 - 5PM

One of our favorite Cinefamily events ever IS BACK! Summer’s around the corner, and you know how we here at the Cinefamily love two things in tandem: busting out the patio grill, and The Five Minutes Game. What’s all this about a game, you ask? We’re firm believers in “Every movie is interesting for at least its first five minutes”, those fascinating moments when you’re still entering the new world a film presents you, and trying to figure out what the hell’s going on. What we’re gonna do is choose fifteen movies you’ve likely never seen before (with most, if not all the films unavailable on DVD), line ‘em up, and only show you the first five minutes of each, not counting their opening credits. Then you, the audience, votes on which film we all then watch in its entirety. So, bring something to cook on our grill, and let’s get started!

5-6:30PM – The Five Minutes Game!
6:30-8PM – we tally the votes and BBQ on the patio!
8-10PM – we watch the winning film!

Jodorowsky's Dune (5/25)

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5/25/2014 - 10PM

One of the greatest films never made, by one of underground cinema’s greatest talents of the 20th century, finally comes to light in this documentary look at Alejandro Jodorowsky’s long-gestated, but never filmed version of Frank Herbert’s mammoth sci-fi epic Dune. Having achieved immortal arthouse/midnight movie status in the early Seventies with El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky next attempted to tackle the “unfilmable” Dune universe, spending several years and millions of dollars in pre-production, only to have the project cancelled right as the final pieces of funding were to have come. No matter that an insanely cool international cast (Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, Euro transsexual pop star Amanda Lear) had been assembled, or that a brain-breaking design team (with artists like H.R. Giger and comic book genius Moebius) had toiled for endless months — for this ultimate filmic head-trip was never truly meant to be. Equal parts comprehensive overview of every phase of the project and exploration of Jodorowsky’s rollercoaster multimedia career, Jorodowsky’s Dune is the fascinating journey film fans have been clamoring for.
Dir. Frank Pavich, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Jodorowsky’s Dune”!
YouTube Preview Image

Herzog's "Fata Morgana" (5/24)

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5/24/2014 - 10PM

In 1969, Werner Herzog journeyed to the Sahara to film mirages — and in the process, came home with some wonderously trippy footage, and layered it with narration from charming film critic Lotte Eisner (a recitation of the Mayan “Popol Vuh” creation myth) to create this dense lasagna of a nature doc. One of Herzog’s earliest features, Fata Morgana begins with a audacious zoned-out opening, and immediately hits transcendent marks straight off, before getting even stranger as its chimerical imaginary civilization passes from Golden Age to Decline. As well, Herzog films like a tourist to a different planet — one where the presence of life is largely manifest through detritus and death: a car turns endlessly in circles, a bearded man in welding goggles flourishes a monitor lizard at the camera. Here, the onscreen subjects are frequently enhanced by the mythic, mirrored properties of the heat haze, and an eclectic soundtrack that switches from Handel organ music to Leonard Cohen, and onto a weird local drum/piano duo. An absolutely stunning Herzog head film!
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1971, DCP, 79 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Fata Morgana”!

HEAVY MIDNITES: She's All That (co-star Jodi Lyn O'Keefe in person!)

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5/23/2014 - MIDNITE

Whisk off those glasses and snap on some butterfly clips, ‘cause we’re headed back to high school, JNCO-style. When jock charmer Freddie Prinze, Jr. breaks up with his narcissistic girlfriend, he bets his best bud Paul Walker (RIP) that he can turn any girl into the next prom queen. But when he attempts to transform the awkward, cute-as-a-button Rachael Leigh Cook — will he be the one changed? It’s a modern day Pygmalion (or was it My Fair Lady?) cranked to 11 with MTV/Real World jokes, a Fatboy Slim dance number, Hollywood Blvd. performance artists, hott hunks and bikini beach bods in one of the greatest cinematic time capsules of the pre-Y2K era. It’s rollin’ up on fifteen years since the funky-fresh vibe of She’s All That launched not only lexicon bullion like “hoover it”, “major wiggage” and “jump in my ass”, but a cast roster that’ll leave your head spinning: Anna Paquin, Usher, Matthew Lillard, Clea DuVall, Lil’ Kim, Gabrielle Union and The Mighty Ducks’ Elden Henson. Packed from start to finish with a catchy-as-hell soundtrack and an epic teen romance, She’s All That is definitive millennial fun. Schedule permitting, Jodi Lyn O’Keefe in person! Plus, DJ McAllister (KXLU 88.9fm’s “She Rocks”) will be here to spin tunes before the show.
Dir. Robert Iscove, 1999, 35mm, 97 min.

Watch the trailer for “She’s All That”!
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Herzog's "Fata Morgana" (5/23, Werner Herzog in person!)

fatamorgana2_website
5/23/2014 - 9:50PM

Werner Herzog in person!In 1969, Werner Herzog journeyed to the Sahara to film mirages — and in the process, came home with some wonderously trippy footage, and layered it with narration from charming film critic Lotte Eisner (a recitation of the Mayan “Popol Vuh” creation myth) to create this dense lasagna of a nature doc. One of Herzog’s earliest features, Fata Morgana begins with a audacious zoned-out opening, and immediately hits transcendent marks straight off, before getting even stranger as its chimerical imaginary civilization passes from Golden Age to Decline. As well, Herzog films like a tourist to a different planet — one where the presence of life is largely manifest through detritus and death: a car turns endlessly in circles, a bearded man in welding goggles flourishes a monitor lizard at the camera. Here, the onscreen subjects are frequently enhanced by the mythic, mirrored properties of the heat haze, and an eclectic soundtrack that switches from Handel organ music to Leonard Cohen, and onto a weird local drum/piano duo. An absolutely stunning Herzog head film!
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1971, DCP, 79 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Fata Morgana”!

Welles' "Othello" (5/23)

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5/23/2014 - 7:30PM

Timeless, sensual, spirited, courageous — all appropriately outsized words to describe this sumptuous adaptation of the Bard’s tale of the Moor, crafted by and starring one of cinema’s great outsized personalities. The electric tension inherent in Shakespeare’s triangle of Othello, Desdemona and Iago is further bolstered by some of the sharpest, starkest imagery of Orson Welles’ career; this is visual work on the same level of Citizen Kane and Touch Of Evil, along with being a prime example of how black-and-white can be even more vibrant than color. An inherent facet of Welles’ directorial life on film is that the behind-the-scenes chaos that frequently shadowed him (the bad financing deals, the false starts, the re-casting and the re-cuts) often influenced the finished products’ spirit, for better or worse. Here, however, there are no visible seams. Even though Othello’s infamous, on-again-off-again production took three years, frequently shedded cast members and spanned many different cities passing for one central locale, it’s all of one organic, captivating piece — one which nabbed the ‘52 Palme D’Or at Cannes. Brand-new restoration!
Dir. Orson Welles, 1952, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for Welles’ “Othello”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/22)

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5/22/2014 - 10PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!) Plus, DJ President Ford (KXLU 88.9fm) will spin tunes before the show.
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN - The Best of KLIK!: Contemporary Shorts from Around the World

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5/22/2014 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by GLAS Animation and the Netherlands Film Fund.

Following the shorts program, Dutchies Joost Lieuwma (director of Leaving Home), Mathijs Stegink (animator and KLIK! programmer), Tünde Vollenbroek (animation producer and KLIK!s programming director) will join us for a Q&A.

Every November, we get awful jealous of animation fans in Europe — for that’s when they gleefully converge at KLIK!: the annual animation fest centered in Amsterdam. Lucky for us, KLIK! has just brought Stateside a best-of-the-best rundown from the many short films in their ever-growing arsenal. Come enjoy winners like Spin (Germany, KLIK! Political Animation Award 2010) and Rabbit and Deer (Hungary, KLIK! Amsterdam Audience Award 2013), alongside eye-catching shorts like My…My… (China) and Luke and Lotta (Poland).

FILMS TO BE SCREENED:
- The Little Boy and the Beast (Germany, dirs. Uwe Heidschoetter & Johannes Weiland)
- According To Birds (Netherlands, dir. Linde Faas)
- The Employment (Argentina, dir. Santiago Grasso)
- My…My… (China, dir. Ray Lei)
- Rabbit and Deer (Hungary, dir. Péter Vácz)
- Spin (Germany, dir. Max Hattler)
- Luke and Lotta (Poland, dir. Renata Gąsiorowska)
- Metamorphosis (USA, dir. Studio Buck)
- Luminaris (Argentina, dir. Juan Pablo Zaramella)
- Leaving Home (Netherlands, dir. Joost Lieuwma)

Watch the trailer for “The Best Of KLIK!”

Welles' "Othello" (5/22)

othello2_480_309
5/22/2014 - 5:15PM

Timeless, sensual, spirited, courageous — all appropriately outsized words to describe this sumptuous adaptation of the Bard’s tale of the Moor, crafted by and starring one of cinema’s great outsized personalities. The electric tension inherent in Shakespeare’s triangle of Othello, Desdemona and Iago is further bolstered by some of the sharpest, starkest imagery of Orson Welles’ career; this is visual work on the same level of Citizen Kane and Touch Of Evil, along with being a prime example of how black-and-white can be even more vibrant than color. An inherent facet of Welles’ directorial life on film is that the behind-the-scenes chaos that frequently shadowed him (the bad financing deals, the false starts, the re-casting and the re-cuts) often influenced the finished products’ spirit, for better or worse. Here, however, there are no visible seams. Even though Othello’s infamous, on-again-off-again production took three years, frequently shedded cast members and spanned many different cities passing for one central locale, it’s all of one organic, captivating piece — one which nabbed the ‘52 Palme D’Or at Cannes. Brand-new restoration!
Dir. Orson Welles, 1952, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for Welles’ “Othello”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/21)

nosferatu666_website
5/21/2014 - 9:50PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!) Plus, DJ Prætorius will be here to spin records before the show.
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

Welles' "Othello" (5/21)

othello_480_309
5/21/2014 - 7:30PM

Timeless, sensual, spirited, courageous — all appropriately outsized words to describe this sumptuous adaptation of the Bard’s tale of the Moor, crafted by and starring one of cinema’s great outsized personalities. The electric tension inherent in Shakespeare’s triangle of Othello, Desdemona and Iago is further bolstered by some of the sharpest, starkest imagery of Orson Welles’ career; this is visual work on the same level of Citizen Kane and Touch Of Evil, along with being a prime example of how black-and-white can be even more vibrant than color. An inherent facet of Welles’ directorial life on film is that the behind-the-scenes chaos that frequently shadowed him (the bad financing deals, the false starts, the re-casting and the re-cuts) often influenced the finished products’ spirit, for better or worse. Here, however, there are no visible seams. Even though Othello’s infamous, on-again-off-again production took three years, frequently shedded cast members and spanned many different cities passing for one central locale, it’s all of one organic, captivating piece — one which nabbed the ‘52 Palme D’Or at Cannes. Brand-new restoration! Plus, DJ Prætorius will be here to spin records before the show.
Dir. Orson Welles, 1952, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for Welles’ “Othello”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/20)

nosferatu_480_309
5/20/2014 - 9:50PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!)
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

Welles' "Othello" (5/20)

othello3_480_309
5/20/2014 - 7:30PM

Timeless, sensual, spirited, courageous — all appropriately outsized words to describe this sumptuous adaptation of the Bard’s tale of the Moor, crafted by and starring one of cinema’s great outsized personalities. The electric tension inherent in Shakespeare’s triangle of Othello, Desdemona and Iago is further bolstered by some of the sharpest, starkest imagery of Orson Welles’ career; this is visual work on the same level of Citizen Kane and Touch Of Evil, along with being a prime example of how black-and-white can be even more vibrant than color. An inherent facet of Welles’ directorial life on film is that the behind-the-scenes chaos that frequently shadowed him (the bad financing deals, the false starts, the re-casting and the re-cuts) often influenced the finished products’ spirit, for better or worse. Here, however, there are no visible seams. Even though Othello’s infamous, on-again-off-again production took three years, frequently shedded cast members and spanned many different cities passing for one central locale, it’s all of one organic, captivating piece — one which nabbed the ‘52 Palme D’Or at Cannes. Brand-new restoration!
Dir. Orson Welles, 1952, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for Welles’ “Othello”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/19)

nosferatu3_480_309
5/19/2014 - 9:30PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!)
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/18)

nosferatu666_website
5/18/2014 - 5PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!)
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

Welles' "Othello" (5/18)

othello2_480_309
5/18/2014 - 2:45PM

Timeless, sensual, spirited, courageous — all appropriately outsized words to describe this sumptuous adaptation of the Bard’s tale of the Moor, crafted by and starring one of cinema’s great outsized personalities. The electric tension inherent in Shakespeare’s triangle of Othello, Desdemona and Iago is further bolstered by some of the sharpest, starkest imagery of Orson Welles’ career; this is visual work on the same level of Citizen Kane and Touch Of Evil, along with being a prime example of how black-and-white can be even more vibrant than color. An inherent facet of Welles’ directorial life on film is that the behind-the-scenes chaos that frequently shadowed him (the bad financing deals, the false starts, the re-casting and the re-cuts) often influenced the finished products’ spirit, for better or worse. Here, however, there are no visible seams. Even though Othello’s infamous, on-again-off-again production took three years, frequently shedded cast members and spanned many different cities passing for one central locale, it’s all of one organic, captivating piece — one which nabbed the ‘52 Palme D’Or at Cannes. Brand-new restoration!
Dir. Orson Welles, 1952, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for Welles’ “Othello”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/17, 10:30pm)

nosferatu_480_309
5/17/2014 - 10:30PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!)
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (5/17, 8pm)

nosferatu3_480_309
5/17/2014 - 8PM

As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!)
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

Welles' "Othello" (5/17)

othello_480_309
5/17/2014 - 5:30PM

Timeless, sensual, spirited, courageous — all appropriately outsized words to describe this sumptuous adaptation of the Bard’s tale of the Moor, crafted by and starring one of cinema’s great outsized personalities. The electric tension inherent in Shakespeare’s triangle of Othello, Desdemona and Iago is further bolstered by some of the sharpest, starkest imagery of Orson Welles’ career; this is visual work on the same level of Citizen Kane and Touch Of Evil, along with being a prime example of how black-and-white can be even more vibrant than color. An inherent facet of Welles’ directorial life on film is that the behind-the-scenes chaos that frequently shadowed him (the bad financing deals, the false starts, the re-casting and the re-cuts) often influenced the finished products’ spirit, for better or worse. Here, however, there are no visible seams. Even though Othello’s infamous, on-again-off-again production took three years, frequently shedded cast members and spanned many different cities passing for one central locale, it’s all of one organic, captivating piece — one which nabbed the ‘52 Palme D’Or at Cannes. Brand-new restoration!
Dir. Orson Welles, 1952, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for Welles’ “Othello”!

FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS: Death Spa (rare uncut 35mm, filmmakers in person!)

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5/16/2014 - MIDNITE

When the ‘80s first arrived, two very important brand-new cultural touchstones — the slasher film and the workout video — both hit the culture with a resounding bang, so it was purely natural that the two would eventually combine into one perfect entertainment package. Though this film was not the first to forge into this brave new territory (that honor belongs to 1987’s Killer Workout), Michael Fischa’s magnum opus about a health club that may or may not be possessed by a vengeful spirit is arguably the superior work(out.) What Death Spa understands is that you’re here to see people get horribly mauled by gym equipment, and it delivers on this premise with widely grinning abandon. Co-starring horror legend Ken Foree (Dawn of the Dead), Death Spa is one of those late-’80s video store gems that demands with all the forces of hell to be unearthed — so what better way to enjoy it than with a once-in-a-lifetime screening of the world’s only UNCUT 35mm print (with all its MPAA-cursed gore intact), plus producer Jamie Beardsley, editor Mike Kewley and screenwriter Mitch Paradise in person!
Dir. Michael Fischa, 1990, 35mm, 88 min.

Watch the trailer for “Death Spa”!

FANDOR INDIE MIXER: Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" (Werner Herzog in person, opening night party!)

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5/16/2014 - 8PM

Presented by FANDOR.

WERNER HERZOG IN PERSON — WOW!!!! As mysterious, beautiful and otherworldly as she was in Zulawski’s Possession, Isabelle Adjani stars with Klaus Kinski as the galvanizing pair in this masterful re-invention of Murnau’s 1922 silent. It’s hard to remember a time when Werner Herzog didn’t belong to the whole world, but rather was merely an unofficial spearhead of the “New German Cinema”, along with Wenders and Fassbinder. That time officially ended in 1979, as the sweepingly beautiful, archly expressionistic Nosferatu The Vampyre became Herzog’s first film Hollywood backing and an international cast. Here, he re-invents many of Murnau’s signature moments, but with an emphasis on the stretching of time to a bizarre, hallucinatory stroll, as if we are inside Dracula’s syrupy, centuries-old field of vision. Amongst this heightened setting, Kinski is pitch-perfect as the rat-like, pale demon — and Adjani is electric, adding an extra hypnotic/iconic dimension to an already mythic re-telling of the Bram Stoker tale. Come breathe in a brand-new 35mm print of the film’s German-language version (produced simultaneously with the English version, and unseen theatrically on these shores!)
Dir. Werner Herzog, 1979, 35mm, 107 min.

CLICK HERE TO BROWSE FANDOR’S WERNER HERZOG VIEWING LIBRARY!

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “FANDOR INDIE MIXER: Nosferatu the Vampyre”!

DOUG BENSON MOVIE INTERRUPTION: Non-Stop

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5/14/2014 - 7:30PM

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Paul F. Tompkins to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.
Dir. Jaume Collet-Serra, 2014, DCP, 106 min.

Watch the trailer for “Non-Stop”!
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Jodorowsky's Dune (5/13, 10:15pm)

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5/13/2014 - 10:15PM

One of the greatest films never made, by one of underground cinema’s greatest talents of the 20th century, finally comes to light in this documentary look at Alejandro Jodorowsky’s long-gestated, but never filmed version of Frank Herbert’s mammoth sci-fi epic Dune. Having achieved immortal arthouse/midnight movie status in the early Seventies with El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky next attempted to tackle the “unfilmable” Dune universe, spending several years and millions of dollars in pre-production, only to have the project cancelled right as the final pieces of funding were to have come. No matter that an insanely cool international cast (Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, Euro transsexual pop star Amanda Lear) had been assembled, or that a brain-breaking design team (with artists like H.R. Giger and comic book genius Moebius) had toiled for endless months — for this ultimate filmic head-trip was never truly meant to be. Equal parts comprehensive overview of every phase of the project and exploration of Jodorowsky’s rollercoaster multimedia career, Jorodowsky’s Dune is the fascinating journey film fans have been clamoring for. DJ Treeko (KXLU 88.9fm) will be here to spin tunes before the show!
Dir. Frank Pavich, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Jodorowsky’s Dune”!
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Jodorowsky's Dune (5/13, 8pm)

jodorowskysdune_website
5/13/2014 - 8PM

One of the greatest films never made, by one of underground cinema’s greatest talents of the 20th century, finally comes to light in this documentary look at Alejandro Jodorowsky’s long-gestated, but never filmed version of Frank Herbert’s mammoth sci-fi epic Dune. Having achieved immortal arthouse/midnight movie status in the early Seventies with El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky next attempted to tackle the “unfilmable” Dune universe, spending several years and millions of dollars in pre-production, only to have the project cancelled right as the final pieces of funding were to have come. No matter that an insanely cool international cast (Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, Euro transsexual pop star Amanda Lear) had been assembled, or that a brain-breaking design team (with artists like H.R. Giger and comic book genius Moebius) had toiled for endless months — for this ultimate filmic head-trip was never truly meant to be. Equal parts comprehensive overview of every phase of the project and exploration of Jodorowsky’s rollercoaster multimedia career, Jorodowsky’s Dune is the fascinating journey film fans have been clamoring for.
Dir. Frank Pavich, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Jodorowsky’s Dune”!
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Kurosawa's "Ran"

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5/12/2014 - 8PM

Delivered with blunt horror, towering visuals and some of the most majestic sweep of filmmaker Akira Kurosawa’s career, this “God is dead” take on King Lear is void of any sensation of honor — for in A.K.’s vision for this masterpiece, life is a ladder of predation and merciless opportunism. The weak are fair game to be taken, the pious ground to dust, and “victory” arrives via suckerpunches of gunfire and betrayal. A damnation portrait of existential horror in the feudal era, Ran is bathed in electric color, and covered in fine-detail flourishes: the symbolism of clouds, the subtle uses of natural light, the over-the-top costumes, and the landscape-porn avalanche of wide shots that crawl over poison-green mountains and scorched earth. At the center of this blood-red whirlwind: Tatsuya Nakadai, painting his heart black in a Noh-fueled rendition of “Lord Hidetora”, obliterating himself in freefall alongside his disintegrating kingdom. Impossibly cool stuff.
Dir. Akira Kurosawa, 1985, 35mm, 160 min.

Watch the trailer for Kurosawa’s “Ran”!
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An Evening With Tatsuya Nakadai (feat. Kurosawa's "Ran")

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5/11/2014 - 7:30PM

AN EVENING WITH TATSUYA NAKADAI – 7:30pm
The world over, there’s simply no equivalent to Japanese screen giant Tatsuya Nakadai, a truly versatile performer capable of both extreme stylization and off-the-cuff naturalism, and a deep collaborator with some of his country’s all-time greatest filmmakers (Kurosawa, Kobayashi, Ichikawa, Naruse, Teshigahara and many more.) Here in the U.S., Nakadai unjustly never became a symbol or an icon, for his screen persona was always too diverse. Whether the format was a samurai sword-and-sandal epic, an emotionally raw, novelistic tragedy or a lurid horror/suspense romp, the genius of Nakadai instantly shone through — and what makes these films timeless partly stems from his perfect marriage of craft, discipline, risk, adventure and expression. Through a rare confluence of events, Tatsuya will be in Los Angeles to join us for a special evening of remembrances, reflections on his craft, and a big-screen show of Ran: Akira Kurosawa’s 1985 jidaigeki battleship, in which Tatsuya grabs the King Lear reins for the stylized performance of a lifetime. Tatsuya may never get to visit Los Angeles again, so come visit with the master for this extraordinary Q&A appearance!

Kurosawa’s RAN – approx. 9:00pm
Delivered with blunt horror, towering visuals and some of the most majestic sweep of filmmaker Akira Kurosawa’s career, this “God is dead” take on King Lear is void of any sensation of honor — for in A.K.’s vision for this masterpiece, life is a ladder of predation and merciless opportunism. The weak are fair game to be taken, the pious ground to dust, and “victory” arrives via suckerpunches of gunfire and betrayal. A damnation portrait of existential horror in the feudal era, Ran is bathed in electric color, and covered in fine-detail flourishes: the symbolism of clouds, the subtle uses of natural light, the over-the-top costumes, and the landscape-porn avalanche of wide shots that crawl over poison-green mountains and scorched earth. At the center of this blood-red whirlwind: Tatsuya Nakadai, painting his heart black in a Noh-fueled rendition of “Lord Hidetora”, obliterating himself in freefall alongside his disintegrating kingdom. Impossibly cool stuff.
Ran Dir. Akira Kurosawa, 1985, 35mm, 160 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “An Evening With Tatsuya Nakadai”!

MOTHER'S DAY MATINEE: Mildred Pierce

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5/11/2014 - 4:30PM

A film noir mother-lode for the ages! Recently remade for HBO by Todd Haynes (Far From Heaven), this 1945 Joan Crawford classic contains a number of sharp familial themes that still ring true today. “The strain on a family during the Great Depression, a working single mother, an entitled and rebellious teenager, and a woman with an entrepreneurial spirit and vision — it’s for these reasons that HBO thought it perfect to bring back. We also have many actors at their peak here, with most nominated for Oscars, including Ann Blyth (Veda, the spoiled daughter) and the wonderful Eve Arden (Mildred’s best friend Ida). But it was Crawford who won Best Actress, strong yet vulnerable in the role — and she’s so good that there are actually moments you may forget you’re watching Joan Crawford. What impresses me most, though, are her close ups — the perfect bone structure of her face and the emotion that she’s able to bring to her big blue eyes. See if they don’t draw you into all the drama of Mildred Pierce.” — Kimberly Truhler, Glamamor
Dir. Michael Curtiz, 1945, 35mm, 111 min.

Watch the trailer for “Mildred Pierce”!
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Cut Chemist performs Funk Off Live! (U.S. premiere) + "La Brune Et Moi"

cutchemist2_website
5/10/2014 - 10:30PM

Cut Chemist: one of the greatest mixmasters on the planet, a world-class scratch artist, and collaborator with Jurassic 5, Edan, Blackalicious and DJ Shadow. It goes without saying he’s also a LP collector assassin too; amongst the genres through which he loves to crosscut, a big love of Cut’s is crunchy electronic post-punk — so much so that he’s now issued the compilation “Funk Off”, highlighting French minimal synthheads Vox Populi! and Pacific 231 with tracks that originally appeared on their rare ‘80s cassette and vinyl releases. Tonight’s show is a live performance that encompasses all forms of media (vinyl, cassettes and video), along with live delay and loop effects. Here, Cut reunites with longtime collaborator and Cinefamily’s own Tom Fitzgerald, who’ll perform a dense blanket of live visuals along with the music. After the break, it’s La Brune Et Moi: a “lost” film recently re-discovered, and a whizz-bang tour through the Parisian punk underground (circa 1980), starring The Conformist’s Pierre Clementi and featuring energetic Gallic bands like Metal Urbain, the Go-Go Pigalles and Astroflash!
La Brune Et Moi Dir. Phillipe Puicouyoul, 1980, digital presentation, 50 min.

Watch the trailer for “Funk Off”!
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Man On A Swing + Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins (Joel Grey in person!)

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5/10/2014 - 4:30PM

Man On A Swing – 4:30pm
Fresh off an Oscar win for Cabaret, Joel Grey gives a terrifying, hilarious and inscrutable turn in Man On A Swing, a jewel in the crown of paranoid ‘70s conspiracy thrillers. Odds are good that David Fincher had this gripping film with occult overtones in mind when he made Zodiac, for this true-crime tale is brisk, efficient and all-too-real. When a young woman is discovered smothered to death inside her car at a supermarket parking lot, police chief Cliff Robertson withholds key facts from the press to sift out false leads — and then gets a phone call from Grey, a factory worker who claims to be clairvoyant and who knows an awful lot about the case’s hidden particulars. Grey’s a real wonder to watch here as a sort of jittery, slightly domesticated version of Cabaret’s Emcee. Man On A Swing marked another quirky success for Frank Perry (The Swimmer, Last Summer, Play It As It Lays), one of his era’s most undervalued directors. And, this one may sport a PG rating, but remember — that’s a Seventies PG, which means this is still really creepy, intense stuff.
Frank Perry, 1974, digital presentation, 110 min.

Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins – approx. 7:30pm
After the fantastic one-two of Cabaret and Man On A Swing, Joel Grey hung tight to his New York theater roots, only coming back to Hollywood for sporadic film roles. What lured him back was a doozy of a good time: the chance to play a martial arts master in a tongue-in-cheek adaptation of the hugely popular Destroyer series of spy novels! A kind of American James Bond saga with Marvel-style supervillains in the mix, the Destroyer books starred the hero Remo Williams, a rough-’n-tumble former cop tapped by a secret agency to fight robotic, telekinetic and undead baddies — and trained by the Korean kung fu badass Chiun. Here, Fred Ward (always one of our favorite film gruffians) is Remo — and Grey (in a Golden Globe-nominated performance) is Chiun, taking a role that might have been mere caricature in the hands of a lesser actor into way loftier territory. Grey turns on the burn and steals the show, utilizing his finely honed skills as both a comedian and a dancer to create an unforgettably fluid and hilarious fighting wizard.
Dir. Guy Hamilton, 1985, 35mm, 121 min.

Watch the trailer for “Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins”!
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HEAVY MIDNITES: Death Race 2000

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5/9/2014 - MIDNITE

Roger Corman’s depraved drive-in hit is revving its engine, ready to plow through an audience of die-hard midnight maniacs! So get set for the Transcontinental Road Race, a lethal coast-to-coast, no-holds-barred orgy of fast cars and flattened bodies (points are not just scored for speed, but for the number of innocent pedestrians killed) in mankind’s greatest sporting event ever. Drivers David Carradine, Sylvester Stallone, Roberta Collins, The Karate Kid’s Martin Kove and cult movie icon Mary Woronov are putting the pedal to the metal, on the run to outmaneuver not just one another but also groups of activists willing to do whatever it takes to stop our barbaric heroes. A biting satire on America’s thirst for violence, director Paul “Eating Raoul” Bartel’s update of sci-fi legend Ib Melchior’s story is as pitch black as it is blood red, beautifully shot by Tak Fujimoto (fresh off Malick’s Badlands), fine-tuned to optimum performance by ace editor Tina Hirsch, and gloriously well-deserved of its infamous Ebert zero-star review denouncing the film for being in “poor taste, unnecessarily gratuitous in both nudity and violence.” In our words, a classic.
Dir. Paul Bartel, 1975, 35mm, 80 min.

Watch the trailer for “Death Race 2000″!
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An Evening With Joel Grey (feat. "Cabaret"!)

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5/9/2014 - 8PM

With only a gesture, a step or a single line, he instantly captures the audience’s attention — and with the rest of the show, he mesmerizes with a brand of storytelling, song and dance that no other performer can duplicate. Simply put, the Tony-winning, Oscar-winning, Golden Globe-winning, BAFTA-winning and Emmy-nominated Joel Grey has always been one of Cinefamily’s super-favorite performers. We’re overjoyed to welcome Joel to our house to discuss his epic and storied career, not only working with world-class collaborators of stage and screen such as Bob Fosse, Lars von Trier, Frank Perry, Robert Wilson, Robert Altman and Steven Soderbergh, but also honing and advancing his magnificently versatile craft over a span of many decades. After the break, we’ll screen Cabaret on 35mm, which contains the defining role of Joel’s film career: that of the wicked, strange, sensual, otherworldly Emcee.
Cabaret Dir. Bob Fosse, 1972, 35mm, 124 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “An Evening With Joel Grey”!

CINESPIA SALON: Numero Group presents a Ned Doheny Record Release Party (feat. "The Ski Bum!)

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5/8/2014 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by THE NUMERO GROUP

Join us for a special in-person Q&A appearance by L.A. stalwart singer/songwriter (and self-proclaimed “avatar for casual vulgarity”) Ned Doheny, an advance chance to purchase his new Numero Group compilation “Separate Oceans”, and an ultra-rare IB Tech 35mm screening of The Ski Bum: one of the Seventies’ oddest counterculture curios, featuring cameos by Ned and Jackson Browne. Plus, Ski Bum filmmaker Bruce Clark in person! It’s The Graduate on the slopes, only with psychedelic fringes, hippies, dope deals, bizarre fantasy sequences and enough reverb-echo for a Joe Meek tribute. Before he was an auteur du sexy with Wild Orchid and Red Shoe Diaries, Zalman King starred in a number of Seventies underground dramas such as tonight’s film, in which he’s an angry young man in a wintery Colorado resort town, trying his best to avoid the ski-bummer that lies dead ahead if he complies with the sinister wishes of the burg’s local plutocrat. Co-starring Charlotte Rampling, this highly unusual tale is awash in expansive, snow-capped ‘scope cinematography and a whirlwind of spacey vibes.
Dir. Bruce D. Clark, 1971, 35mm, 94 min.

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: Motorama

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5/7/2014 - 10:30PM

Lost & Found Film Club presents a carefully curated mix of ephemeral, industrial, educational, and sponsored films in the gloriously fuzzed-out 16mm format — plus, grilled cheese sandwiches will be available! Any given program may contain children’s films, social engineering and training films, advertisements, mental hygiene madness, animation, documentaries, student experiments, home movies on rusted reels — pretty much anything that isn’t a commercial feature film. Did we forget to mention that GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICHES WILL BE AVAILABLE?!

This month we’re flashing the signal for all gearheads and grease monkeys to put the pedal to the metal and get your pistons pounding over to Lost & Found for a night of “auto-rotica” that’ll give you a new lease on laughter. We’ll look beyond the twisted metal of driver’s training films (don’t worry, we’ve got some of those too) for experimental animation, talking cars for kids, neon assembly lines and carwash epiphanies. You’ll be driving under the influence of these films for days.

Program Includes:

Ballet Robotique* – General Motors (1982)
Quarter Midgets of America Children’s Racing Championships – STP (1973)
Alco Beat (1965)
Moped Safety (1970s)
Incident on Route 2 (1959)
Child Restraints (1980s)
Memento – AT&T (1968)
Vicious Cycles* – Len Janson, Chuck Menville (1967)
The Talking Car – AAA (1969)
La Divina (1968)
Black Jackets and Choppers** – John Carney (1979)
The Mad Canadian – NFBC (1976)

*Courtesy of AV Geeks
**Courtesy of Canyon Cinema

Watch our original trailer for “Motorama!”

Allday Everyday & Luaka Bop present A William Onyeabor Celebration (w/ The Lijadu Sisters in person!)

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5/7/2014 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by Allday Everyday, Luaka Bop & Cinespia

“If Fela Kuti was a child of James Brown, fellow Nigerian William Onyeabor is something like the next-generation musical offspring of Parliament-Funkadelic.” — NPR

Waaaaay far away from being just another obscure artist stacked on the reissue pile, Nigerian mystery man William Onyeabor generated the kind of warm-yet-crisp, blissed-out Afrobeat fun with his extended keyboard jams that crate diggers only stumble upon once every several years. This is music that’s impossible not to feel as your ears take it in. Onyeabor’s story is compounded by both the lack of extant info and the dearth of rumors about him: did he actually study cinematography in Russia, invest in Swedish business, make his own Nigerian movies, or give it all away for Jesus? Tonight, David Byrne’s label Luaka Bop — the folks who did a mitzvah by bringing Onyeabor’s music to the 21st century world — presents: 1) Fantastic Man, the Onyeabor doc that takes us on a heady trip through the myths, legends and semi-truths of this shadowy figure; 2) Konkombe, the 1979 Nigerian film showcasing the Afrobeat, highlife and traditional music of the region; and 3) a SUPER-RARE live Q&A appearance by the Lijadu Sisters, contemporaries of Onyeabor who are performing at the Greek on May 8th! Q&A moderated by Jeremy Sole (KCRW.)

Watch the trailer for “Who Is William Onyeabor?”!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Autarky! Frontier Animation from CalArts 2014

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5/6/2014 - 9:45PM

Celebrating five years of screening current work primarily from students in their second or third year in CalArts’ Character and Experimental Animation Departments, Autarky! is a show centered around bringing work from the students’ hands to the screen. Tonight’s pieces will include stop-motion animation, drawing, painting, video, flicker films, text-based films, and much more!

Featuring:
Charlie Hodgkins – “The Pitch”
Qianyu Zhou – “Dear Mom”
Sasha Schotzko-Harris – “Amelia”
Yon Hui Lee – “Derailed”
Kyu Ri Park – “End Trip”
Stevie Borbolla – “Space Jerks”
Isabelle Aspin – “Land Mine on the Bunny Slope”
Ryann Shannon – ” Rain Check”
Jacob Winkler – “Tension”
AND MORE…

Watch the trailer for “Autarky! 2014″

Sorcerer (brand-new restoration, 5/5)

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5/5/2014 - 10:30PM

“Four men — strangers, enemies — sitting on a load of dynamite together. They have to co-operate, though they hate each other, to survive. That was a metaphor for me for the situation of the world — these different countries need each other.” — William Friedkin

After winning a Best Director Oscar for The French Connection and bringing the equally peerless The Exorcist onto the all-time highest-grossing list, William Friedkin set out on an even more ambitious path, transforming Henri-Georges Clouzot’s ‘50s classic The Wages of Fear into an equally unforgettable and literally explosive jungle nightmare — a blinding, sweat-drenched journey through Hell. As the prime vessel for Sorcerer’s quickly ratcheting tension, Roy Scheider is perfect as a one of a quartet of disgraced criminals who, while hiding out impoverished in South America, take on the hideously dangerous gig of trucking a load of nitroglycerine so volatile it could combust at the slightest jarring. Told with a minimum of dialogue, a maximum of dizzying sound design (a Friedkin trademark), stunningly iconic setpieces and the first of many rich film soundtracks by Tangerine Dream, Sorcerer was unjustly savaged by critics upon its original ‘77 release, and was also shut out of any real box office by a little picture called Star Wars (which opened just a few weeks prior.) Long out of print on pan-and-scan DVD, Sorcerer barrels onto the Cinefamily screen in a brand-new DCP restoration!
Dir. William Friedkin, 1977, DCP, 121 min.

Watch the trailer for “Sorcerer”!

Jodorowsky's Dune (5/4)

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5/4/2014 - 10:30PM

One of the greatest films never made, by one of underground cinema’s greatest talents of the 20th century, finally comes to light in this documentary look at Alejandro Jodorowsky’s long-gestated, but never filmed version of Frank Herbert’s mammoth sci-fi epic Dune. Having achieved immortal arthouse/midnight movie status in the early Seventies with El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Jodorowsky next attempted to tackle the “unfilmable” Dune universe, spending several years and millions of dollars in pre-production, only to have the project cancelled right as the final pieces of funding were to have come. No matter that an insanely cool international cast (Orson Welles, Salvador Dali, Euro transsexual pop star Amanda Lear) had been assembled, or that a brain-breaking design team (with artists like H.R. Giger and comic book genius Moebius) had toiled for endless months — for this ultimate filmic head-trip was never truly meant to be. Equal parts comprehensive overview of every phase of the project and exploration of Jodorowsky’s rollercoaster multimedia career, Jorodowsky’s Dune is the fascinating journey film fans have been clamoring for. DJ Treeko (KXLU 88.9fm) will be here to spin tunes before the show!
Dir. Frank Pavich, 2013, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Jodorowsky’s Dune”!
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Sweet Smell of Success (presented by Jeff Garlin!)

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5/4/2014 - 7:30PM

We know why Jeff Garlin picked Sweet Smell of Success — because he’s a highly intelligent dude. This is one of the most deliciously dark tales to emerge from post-war Hollywood, it hasn’t lost any of its acidic, satirical bite, and it’s got tremendous, unforgettable dual leads from Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis. Sweet Smell is the kind of film that, back when some of our programming staff were video store clerks, we would constantly recommend, as its sizzling energy and emotional whallop cuts across many lines of taste and genre. Lancaster is the iconic J. J. Hunsecker, an unscrupulous and wildly powerful newspaper columnist who aims to eliminate his sister’s affair with a lowly jazz musician. Enter Curtis, an obsequious PR agent who’ll do anything to get in Hunsecker’s favor, including complying with his wish to have the jazzbo disappear from the scene… “Featuring deliciously unsavory dialogue from a brilliantly structured script by Ernest Lehman and Clifford Odets, and noir-ish neon cityscapes from Oscar-winning cinematographer James Wong Howe, Sweet Smell of Success is a cracklingly cruel dispatch form the kill-or-be-killed wilds of 1950s Manhattan.” (Criterion Collection)
Dir. Alexander Mackendrick, 1957, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer for “Sweet Smell of Success”!
YouTube Preview Image

Sorcerer (brand-new restoration, 5/4)

sorcerer5_website
5/4/2014 - 4:30PM

After winning a Best Director Oscar for The French Connection and bringing the equally peerless The Exorcist onto the all-time highest-grossing list, William Friedkin set out on an even more ambitious path, transforming Henri-Georges Clouzot’s ‘50s classic The Wages of Fear into an equally unforgettable and literally explosive jungle nightmare — a blinding, sweat-drenched journey through Hell. As the prime vessel for Sorcerer’s quickly ratcheting tension, Roy Scheider is perfect as a one of a quartet of disgraced criminals who, while hiding out impoverished in South America, take on the hideously dangerous gig of trucking a load of nitroglycerine so volatile it could combust at the slightest jarring. Told with a minimum of dialogue, a maximum of dizzying sound design (a Friedkin trademark), stunningly iconic setpieces and the first of many rich film soundtracks by Tangerine Dream, Sorcerer was unjustly savaged by critics upon its original ‘77 release, and was also shut out of any real box office by a little picture called Star Wars (which opened just a few weeks prior.) Long out of print on pan-and-scan DVD, Sorcerer barrels onto the Cinefamily screen in a brand-new DCP restoration!

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