Ulrich Seidl's "Paradise Trilogy" (feat. one-week run of "Paradise: Love"!)

 

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters. Series co-presented by Goethe-Institut Los Angeles and USC School of Cinematic Arts

 

BUY TICKETS ($12/free for members. Showtimes subject to change):
————————————————————————————————–
PARADISE: LOVE
Friday, May 3rd: 7:30pm (director Ulrich Seidl in person!), 10:35pm
Saturday, May 4th: 4:00pm, 10:15pm
Sunday, May 5th: 2:00pm, 4:45pm, 10:00pm
Monday, May 6th: 7:30pm, 10:15pm
Tuesday, May 7th: 8:00pm
Wednesday, May 8th: 5:00pm
Thursday, May 9th: 4:45pm

 

PARADISE: FAITH
Saturday, May 4th: 7:00pm (sneak preview, director Ulrich Seidl in person!)

 

PARADISE: HOPE
Sunday, May 5th: 7:30pm (sneak preview!)

 

PARADISE: LOVE
All the way from Austria, filmmaker Ulrich Seidl will be here in person for a Q&A after Friday night's opening showtime!
Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can't seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl's trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2012, digital presentation, 120 min.

 

PARADISE: FAITH
All the way from Austria, Ulrich Seidl will be here in person for a Q&A after the film!
Treading the thorniest thematic territory of his career with the second (and most unsettling) film in his Paradise trilogy, Ulrich Seidl gives our brain batteries a full-capacity emotional charge. In this simultaneous confessional/modern parable, Seidl’s uncompromising, symmetric eye turns to Anna Maria, a medical technician (and sister of Paradise: Love's protagonist, Teresa) whose misplaced obligation to bear the weight of Austria’s wayward spirituality on her shoulders acts as penance for her own lingering guilt. Love’s exotic horizons and sun-drenched locales are here replaced by cramped suburban quarters, as we witness Anna Maria’s brand of intensely disturbing worship — and the slow revealing of past “crimes” against her faith. Not without liberal doses of observational humor, and a more naturally-staged dramatic design than some of his more rigidly composed works, Seidl provokes an inquisition: the questioning of both our own individual beliefs, and our greater implication in the fate of those burdened by such a cross. Tumultuous, frightening, and beautifully illuminating.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 113 min.

 

PARADISE: HOPE
As Ulrich Seidl concludes his Paradise Trilogy with this third and final installment, he completes a portrait of modern familial femininity with perhaps his most universal work to date. Splitting the difference between Love’s yearning for a safely liberating sexual freedom and Faith’s emotional chaos, Paradise: Hope presents pubescent rebellion à la Seidl: with a simultaneous distance and intimacy befitting the film’s adventures in young love and experimentation. Overweight teen Melanie (daughter of Love's Teresa; niece of Faith's Anna Maria), sent to a dour fat camp consisting of sterile gymnasiums and bare-bones barracks, seems a typical 13-year-old: drinking, smoking, discovery her sexuality — but as she falls for her much older (and very creepy) physician, her behavior crosses an erratic line in the sand. The most playful and tender of the three films, Hope is a brilliant debut for its child star Melanie Lenz, and is a rewarding dose of Seidl’s wicked determination to find playful pathos in the darkest of corners.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!

 

Paradise: Love (5/9, 4:45pm)

paradiselove1_website
5/9/2013 - 4:45PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Love (5/8, 5:00pm)

paradiselove4_website
5/8/2013 - 5PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!

Paradise: Love (5/7, 8:00pm)

paradiselove2_website
5/7/2013 - 8PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Love (5/6, 10:15pm)

paradiselove1_website
5/6/2013 - 10:15PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!

Paradise: Love (5/6, 7:30pm)

paradiselove4_website
5/6/2013 - 7:30PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!

Paradise: Love (5/5, 10:00pm)

paradiselove3_website
5/5/2013 - 10PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Hope (sneak preview!)

Playful pathos in the darkest of corners!
paradisehope_website
5/5/2013 - 7:30PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

As Ulrich Seidl concludes his Paradise Trilogy with this third and final installment, he completes a portrait of modern familial femininity with perhaps his most universal work to date. Splitting the difference between Love’s yearning for a safely liberating sexual freedom and Faith’s emotional chaos, Paradise: Hope presents pubescent rebellion à la Seidl: with a simultaneous distance and intimacy befitting the film’s adventures in young love and experimentation. Overweight teen Melanie (daughter of Love‘s Teresa; niece of Faith‘s Anna Maria), sent to a dour fat camp consisting of sterile gymnasiums and bare-bones barracks, seems a typical 13-year-old: drinking, smoking, discovery her sexuality — but as she falls for her much older (and very creepy) physician, her behavior crosses an erratic line in the sand. The most playful and tender of the three films, Hope is a brilliant debut for its child star Melanie Lenz, and is a rewarding dose of Seidl’s wicked determination to find playful pathos in the darkest of corners.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 100 min.

Paradise: Love (5/5, 4:45pm)

paradiselove2_website
5/5/2013 - 4:45PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Love (5/5, 2:00pm)

paradiselove1_website
5/5/2013 - 2PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Love (5/4, 10:15pm)

paradiselove4_website
5/4/2013 - 10:15PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Faith (director Ulrich Seidl in person!)

A simultaneous confessional/modern parable!
paradisefaith_website
5/4/2013 - 7PM

Treading the thorniest thematic territory of his career with the second (and most unsettling) film in his Paradise trilogy, Ulrich Seidl gives our brain batteries a full-capacity emotional charge. In this simultaneous confessional/modern parable, Seidl’s uncompromising, symmetric eye turns to Anna Maria, a medical technician (and sister of Paradise: Love‘s protagonist, Teresa) whose misplaced obligation to bear the weight of Austria’s wayward spirituality on her shoulders acts as penance for her own lingering guilt. Love’s exotic horizons and sun-drenched locales are here replaced by cramped suburban quarters, as we witness Anna Maria’s brand of intensely disturbing worship — and the slow revealing of past “crimes” against her faith. Not without liberal doses of observational humor, and a more naturally-staged dramatic design than some of his more rigidly composed works, Seidl provokes an inquisition: the questioning of both our own individual beliefs, and our greater implication in the fate of those burdened by such a cross. Tumultuous, frightening, and beautifully illuminating. All the way from Austria, Ulrich Seidl will be here in person for a Q&A after the film!
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 113 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Faith”

Paradise: Love (5/4, 4:00pm)

paradiselove3_website
5/4/2013 - 4PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Love (5/3, 10:35pm)

paradiselove2_website
5/3/2013 - 10:35PM

“Fassbinder died, so God gave us Ulrich Seidl.” — John Waters

Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2013, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

Paradise: Love (5/3, 7:30pm, director Ulrich Seidl in person!)

paradiselove1_website
5/3/2013 - 7:30PM

All the way from Austria, filmmaker Ulrich Seidl will be here in person for a Q&A after the film! Blurring the lines between reality and fiction in a provocative, supremely rewarding way, Ulrich Seidl’s documentaries and narrative features (which feel one and the same) boast one of the most sharp, easily-identifiable viewpoints in all of cinema. No other films on Earth are quite like Seidl’s richly textured dioramas of desire, despair and bleak humor; it’s no wonder that Werner Herzog has said of Seidl’s work: “Never before in cinema have I been able to look straight into hell.” His most ambitious project to date, the Paradise Trilogy is a transcontinental trio diving into the pains of sexual, religious and youthful disillusion — all shedding light on female protagonists that, in Seidl’s words, are thought to have “low value on the sexual marketplace.” Paradise: Love is an outstanding beginning, following a frumpy middle-aged mom as she vacations across Kenya as an earnest sex-tourist, yearning for an emotional connection that’s eluded her for a lifetime. As she piles up third-world prostitution partners — the dynamics of which she can’t seem to reverse despite her best efforts — the implications of her exploits manifest in gripping, touching and often hilarious displays of vulnerability. Shot in Seidl’s trademark visually symmetrical style, Paradise: Love finds beauty in the repellent, pain in our shared pursuit of satisfaction, and an undeniable heart at the core of humanity.
Dir. Ulrich Seidl, 2012, digital presentation, 120 min.

Watch the trailer for “Paradise: Love”!
YouTube Preview Image

google sira bulucu google sira bulucu google sira bulucu php script encode php script encoder kanunlar kanunlar tuzukler google sira bulucu google sira bulucu google sira bulucu google sira bulucu seo