The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration!)

 

 

 

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

 

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

 

BUY TICKETS ($12/free for members. Showtimes subject to change):
————————————————————————————————–
Friday, March 13th: 7:20pm (opening night party!)
Saturday, March 14th: 3:30pm, 6:30pm (plus Thelma Schoonmaker Skype Q&A!), 9:40pm
Sunday, March 15th: 7:30pm, 10:30pm
Monday, March 16th: 4:30pm, 7:30pm
Tuesday, March 17th: 4:30pm, 7:30pm
Wednesday, March 18th: 4:30pm, 7:30pm, 10:30pm
Thursday, March 19th: 3:30pm

Friday, March 20th: 4:15pm
Saturday, March 21st: 2:15pm
Sunday, March 22nd: 1:00pm
Monday, March 23rd: 4:15pm
Wednesday, March 25th: 4:15pm
Thursday, March 26th: 3:45pm, 7:00pm
Friday, March 27th: 4:15pm
Sunday, March 29th: 4:00pm, 9:45pm
Monday, March 30th: 4:15pm, 7:30pm
Tuesday, March 31st: 3:45pm
Wednesday, April 1st: 4:00pm, 7:20pm
Thursday, April 2nd: 4:00pm

 

Watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”!

 

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 4/1, 4:00pm)

talesofhoffman_website1
4/2/2015 - 4PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 4/1, 7:20pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
4/1/2015 - 7:20PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 4/1, 4:00pm)

talesofhoffman_website3
4/1/2015 - 4PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/31)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/31/2015 - 3:45PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/30, 7:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website1
3/30/2015 - 7:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/30, 4:15pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/30/2015 - 4:15PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/29, 9:45pm)

talesofhoffman_website3
3/29/2015 - 9:45PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/29, 4:00pm)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/29/2015 - 4PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/27)

talesofhoffman_website1
3/27/2015 - 4:15PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/26, 7:00pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/26/2015 - 7PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.” With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/26, 3:45pm)

talesofhoffman_website3
3/26/2015 - 3:45PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/25)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/25/2015 - 4:15PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/23)

talesofhoffman_website3
3/23/2015 - 4:15PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/22)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/22/2015 - 1PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/21)

talesofhoffman_website1
3/21/2015 - 2:15PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/20)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/20/2015 - 4:15PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/19, 3:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website1
3/19/2015 - 3:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffman (brand-new restoration, 3/18, 10:30pm)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/18/2015 - 10:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/18, 7:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website3
3/18/2015 - 7:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/18, 4:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/18/2015 - 4:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/17, 7:30pm)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/17/2015 - 7:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/17, 4:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website1
3/17/2015 - 4:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/16, 7:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website3
3/16/2015 - 7:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/16, 4:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/16/2015 - 4:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/15, 10:30pm)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/15/2015 - 10:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/15, 7:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website1
3/15/2015 - 7:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/14, 9:40pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/14/2015 - 9:40PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration, 3/14, 6:30pm PLUS Thelma Schoonmaker Skype Q&A!)

talesofhoffman_website3
3/14/2015 - 6:30PM

All the way from Tawiwan, longtime Scorsese editor collaborator Thelma Schoonmaker will join us for a Skype Q&A after the film!

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (brand-new restoration) (3/14, 3:30pm)

talesofhoffman_website2
3/14/2015 - 3:30PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

The Tales of Hoffmann (3/13, opening night party!)

talesofhoffman_480_309
3/13/2015 - 7:20PM

Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (The Red Shoes, Stairway To Heaven) create a feverishly romantic, phantasmagoric marriage of cinema, ballet and opera in this one-of-a-kind film on a classic story. A melancholy poet dreams of three women — a mechanical performing doll, a bejeweled satanic siren and a consumptive opera singer — all of whom break his heart in different ways. Shot in glorious three-strip Technicolor with over-the-top color schemes, highly stylized sets and sumptuous costumes, this lavishly imaginative film features world-class prima ballerinas Moira Shearer and Ludmilla Tcherina amongst a cadre of haunting characters — everything from a dozen half-human/half-puppets and a wild-eyed “magic spectacle maker” with foot-long eyebrows, to a bewitching courtesan and her “Satanic master, collector of souls.”

With ingenious use of visual effects incorporating old fashioned theatrical tricks, double exposures and reverse action and slow motion, this wildly innovative story-within-a-story evokes a sumptuous dream state of pure artifice and otherworldly strangeness. No wonder Scorsese is a huge fan and supporter of the film, and none other than George Romero said this is the movie that made him want to make movies.
Dir. Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1951, DCP, 133 min.

To watch the trailer for “The Tales of Hoffmann”, visit the top of this series page!

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