The Films of Lina Wertmüller

Swept Away (newly restored!)

swept away
5/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

This darkly funny, indulgently shot, sexual-political reworking of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew is arguably Lina Wertmüller’s most talked about film, and deservedly so. Part farcical class warfare, obscene S&M fantasy, and surprisingly genuine, romantic melodrama, Swept Away (aka Swept Away… by an Unusual Destiny in the Blue Sea of August) plays like a perverse and knowingly provocative communist-penned Blue Lagoon. An angry working class sailor (Wertmüller male muse of sorts, Giancarlo Giannini) and an egregiously obnoxious, upper-crust, icy blonde (frequent Wertmüller collaborator Mariangela Melato) get stranded on an uninhabited, picture-perfect Mediterranean island – where they spar wildly, theatrically – and shockingly. If you want to know how Lina got her famous reputation – it started with Swept Away.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1974, DCP, 116 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Behind the White Glasses

Lina_Wertmuller2_0
5/27 - 5PM
$12/free for members

“In the whole history of the world, I think there have only been two great women directors, Leni Riefenstahl and Lina Wertmüller,” declares film critic John Simon minutes into Behind the White Glasses, and moments after Lina explained that she bought 5,000 pairs of her trademark glasses back in the 60′s, which she’s been cycling through ever since. With that, Lina’s two surface-level traits – she’s a woman, she wears cool glasses – are dispelled with, and documentarian Valerio Ruiz dives into the mind of one of cinema’s most unique and puzzling storytellers. We hear from frequent collaborator Giancarlo Giannini (Seven Beauties, A Night Full of Rain, etc); Martin Scorsese gushes over Swept Away; we visit the changing landscapes of her films’ locations. But most of all, we get to hear Lina dish dirt: on her storytelling philosophy, on assistant-directing Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2, and her pure love of fun at the movies.

Dir. Valerio Ruiz, 2016, DCP, 112min

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Swept Away (newly restored!)

swept away 2
5/27 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

This darkly funny, indulgently shot, sexual-political reworking of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew is arguably Lina Wertmüller’s most talked about film, and deservedly so. Part farcical class warfare, obscene S&M fantasy, and surprisingly genuine, romantic melodrama, Swept Away (aka Swept Away… by an Unusual Destiny in the Blue Sea of August) plays like a perverse and knowingly provocative communist-penned Blue Lagoon. An angry working class sailor (Wertmüller male muse of sorts, Giancarlo Giannini) and an egregiously obnoxious, upper-crust, icy blonde (frequent Wertmüller collaborator Mariangela Melato) get stranded on an uninhabited, picture-perfect Mediterranean island – where they spar wildly, theatrically – and shockingly. If you want to know how Lina got her famous reputation – it started with Swept Away.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1974, DCP, 116 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Seven Beauties (newly restored!)

seven beauties
5/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

1975’s Seven Beauties finds vanguard director Lina Wertmüller at the top of her game, landing her the honor of being the first woman ever nominated by the Academy for best director. Using every filmic device at her disposal – including graphic violence, farcical humor, and experimental montage – Wertmüller details the picaresque survival odyssey of a dandy (roguish, heavy-lidded Wertmüller muse Giancarlo Giannini) in Mussolini’s fascist Italy. Capturing Giannini’s desperation in long, handheld takes, the film dazzles with its confidence – both in its technical mastery of the medium and its unflinching delivery of scathing socio-political commentary – while being fast-paced and flat-out entertaining. A true tour-de-force and defining work of one of cinema’s greatest auteurs, female or otherwise.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1975, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Love & Anarchy (newly restored!)

love & anarchy
6/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Set in a masterfully art-directed, palazzo-style Roman brothel, Italian auteur Lina Wertmüller’s seventh feature begins railing off raunchy dialogue at the pace of a Robert Altman film, yet finds itself, finally, in the same thematic waters as weighty wartime meditations like All Quiet on the Western Front or The Battle of Algiers. Throw in some torchy Italian folk interludes and you’ve got Love & Anarchy, which blends a fish-out-of-water tale of sex and romance in the big city with a serious examination of the ways in which individual humanity becomes submerged by political imperative. Wertmüller regulars Giancarlo Giannini and Mariangela Melato, appearing as a farmer and prostitute conspiring to assassinate Benito Mussolini, once again display an uncanny talent for pulling from a grab bag of moods and affectations—from the brash pitch work of the bordello foyer to the righteous conviction of the politically persecuted. It’s fast-firing, hilarious stuff, and when the narrative pitch turns anxious and eventually abject in the film’s final act, the full weight of this radical undertaking will hit you like a ton of bricks.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1973, DCP, 124 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Seduction of Mimi (newly restored!)

seduction of mimi
6/3 - 5PM
$12/free for members

A massive international hit, The Seduction of Mimi is the film in which Wertmüller found her style, a unique brew of outrageous adult grotesquerie and sexual-political satire, making it the ideal starter kit for neophytes to her oeuvre. Not only was it her first collaboration with her husband, the brilliant costumier and production designer, but, maybe even more importantly, it was her first in a run of successes with her favorite actor, Giancarlo Giannini. As a working class schlub, always kicked around the block by life – either by the Man, the mafia, or the Marxists – Giannini brings a kind of expressive sensitivity to his roles, and a kind of everyman sympathy to the most base of characters; he’s like an R-rated silent clown, falling somewhere between a Zap comic character and Charlie Chaplin. Climaxing in one of the most iconic and embarrassingly hilarious sex scenes in Wertmüller’s – or anyone’s – filmography, The Seduction of Mimi is sure to provoke – be it laughter or outrage, and sometimes both at the same time.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1972, DCP, 112min

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

All Screwed Up (newly restored!)

all screwed up
6/4 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Sitting comfortably in the firing-on-all-cylinders period of Lina Wertmüller’s directing career – a five-year run of masterpieces from Seduction of Mimi to Seven Beauties – 1974’s lesser known, but equally fantastic All Screwed Up follows the struggles and misadventures of a group of young Sicilian migrants trying to make a life for themselves in the bustling city of Milan. Seamlessly blending sex farce, sociopolitical drama, and physical comedy into an episodic rumination on the trials of the urban working class, Wertmüller keeps her touch light while never shying away from the unpleasantries of life and love among Europe’s lower castes. Pulsing with a great 70s funk score – perfect accompaniment to the smog-drenched cityscapes – All Screwed Up highlights Wertmüller’s keen sense of the absurd and cements her status as a unique yet versatile cinematic voice.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1974, DCP, 105min

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Seven Beauties (newly restored!)

seven beauties 2
6/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

1975’s Seven Beauties finds vanguard director Lina Wertmüller at the top of her game, landing her the honor of being the first woman ever nominated by the Academy for best director. Using every filmic device at her disposal – including graphic violence, farcical humor, and experimental montage – Wertmüller details the picaresque survival odyssey of a dandy (roguish, heavy-lidded Wertmüller muse Giancarlo Giannini) in Mussolini’s fascist Italy. Capturing Giannini’s desperation in long, handheld takes, the film dazzles with its confidence – both in its technical mastery of the medium and its unflinching delivery of scathing socio-political commentary – while being fast-paced and flat-out entertaining. A true tour-de-force and defining work of one of cinema’s greatest auteurs, female or otherwise.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1975, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

A Night Full of Rain (35mm!)

night full of rain
6/7 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

A Night Full of Rain gleefully pits communism against feminism in the form of a doomed couple (played by Wertmüller favorite Giancarlo Giannini and a stunning Candice Bergen), as seen from the perspective of the “friends” – a Greek chorus of judgmental spectators. This claustrophobic portrait of a couple swings between the past and present, as husband and wife engage in a night-long marital drama set to the tune of torrential downpours and TV news of apocalyptic levels of atmospheric pollution. Alternately titled The End of the World in our Usual Bed in a Night Full of Rain, this first-English language effort from Wertmüller is perhaps her most bizarre, high concept film – but also one that rewards – both with enrapturing, formally ambitious cinematography, and its much needed interrogation of the concept of “communist chic.” Not to be missed.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1978, 35mm, 104 min.

Print courtesy of the Istituto Luce Cinecittà
Luce Cinecetta

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Which Way Is Up?

which way is up 1977
6/16 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Considering the stratospheric celebrity Richard Pryor enjoyed by the late 1970s, the singularly profane comedian could afford some eccentric career moves, and ’77 Lina Wertmüller adaptation Which Way Is Up? has to be first among them in terms of sheer improbability. Made in collaboration with El Teatro Campesino — a theater troupe affiliated with Cesar Chavez’s United Farm Workers — Michael Schultz’s film transports Wertmüller’s politically-aware sex comedy The Seduction of Mimi to the contentious — and conspicuously black and Hispanic — gestalt of the mid-century American labor movement. If this is starting to sound a little too highbrow, make no mistake — it’s not. Pryor stars in triplicate (Nutty Professor-style!), his invariably over-the-top characters bedecked in an array of discerning physical extrema, including iron grey eyebrow adhesives and one of those windswept bouffants Al Sharpton used to wear in his James Brown-managing heyday. From comically discrete camera frames, this unruly mob of Pryors play out Freudian rivalries and tit-for-tat infidelities, effectively skewering union politics, consumerist dogma, and ‘70s New Age spiritualism in the process.

Dir. Michael Schultz, 1977, 35mm, 94 min.

http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org