The Aching Beauty of Bela Tarr (feat. one-week run of "The Turin Horse"!)

BUY TICKETS ($12/free for members):
THE TURIN HORSE
Friday, April 27th: 8:00pm (opening night reception)
Saturday, April 28th: 7:30pm
Monday, April 30th: 7:30pm
Wednesday, May 2nd: 7:30pm
Thursday, May 3rd: 10:15pm

 

Click on movie title to jump to event listing, click showtime to jump to Buy Tickets:
—————————————-
WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES – Sunday, April 8: 7:00pm, Monday, April 9: 7:30pm, Monday, April 16: 9:45pm, Thursday, April 19: 9:45pm
FAMILY NEST – Saturday, April 14: 4:30pm
DAMNATION – Sunday, April 15: 7:00pm
THE MAN FROM LONDON – Sunday, April 22: 3:00pm
ALMANAC OF FALL – Sunday, May 6: 5:00pm
SATANTANGO – Saturday, June 2: noon (members-only potluck & screening — first-come, first-serve +1)

MEMBERS-ONLY POTLUCK: Bela Tarr's "Satantango"

All 7 hours of the magnum opus!
satantango_newsite
6/2/2012 - 12PM

NOTE: This event is only for current Cinefamily members +1. As well, the entire event starts out with a potluck luncheon; things like bags of chips and drinks are not encouraged — please bring a dish. Impress us! To inquire about Cinefamily membership, click here!

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
——————
12:00-12:30PM – potluck lunch
12:30-3:00PM-ish – Satantango, Part 1
3:00-3:30PM-ish – intermission
3:30-6:00PM-ish – Satantango, Part 2
6:00-6:30PM-ish – intermission
6:30-9:00PM-ish – Satantango, Part 3

“Devastating, enthralling for every minute of its seven hours. I’d be glad to see it every year for the rest of my life.” — Susan Sontag

The word “masterpiece” is used often enough in our societal discourse to the point where it’s lost most of its meaning — but there are times when the word is not only appropriate, but necessary. On the surface, the very idea of Satantango’s formal conceit — an examination of the collapse of a rural farming collective, told over the course of a day-long running time, and filmed in nothing but long, unbroken takes that frequently last upwards of ten minutes — gives the impression of a difficult experience, but nothing can be further from the truth. This is not just the MASTERPIECE of Bela Tarr’s career, but one of the world’s greatest cinematic achievements: an effortless viewing experience that continually amazes throughout its epic running time. With the plot of a taut 72-minute noir elongated to seven hours, and told in an ever-unfolding Rashomon mode of Rubik’s Cube-like visual and narrative surprises, not one single moment or shot seems extraneous or out-of-place. Due to the prohibitive nature of screening a film at such a length, and since this 35mm print is soon leaving the country, this might be your only chance this decade to see it on the big screen. See it with us NOW — it will change you.
Dir. Bela Tarr, 1994, 35mm, 435 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Satantango”!

Almanac of Fall

Bela Tarr in living, breathing, sumptuous color!
almanacoffall_newsite
5/6/2012 - 5PM

Is it really possible: Bela Tarr in living, breathing, sumptuous color? 1984’s Almanac of Fall, a fascinating outlier in Tarr’s filmography, is a stunner in more ways than one: not only is it photographed in an abundance of hyper-saturated hues, but it also pays homage to the filmmaker whom Tarr has always claimed as his biggest influence: neither Tarkovsky nor Bergman — but Fassbinder. In a sinewy combination of The Bitter Tears Of Petra Von Kant’s hothouse chamber drama and Lola’s Sirk-ian visual palette, Tarr presents a five-pointed configuration of despairing Iron Curtain angst: an ill and emotionally frail mother, a delinquent son, an older man who’s supposedly his teacher, a libidinous nurse and her clueless boyfriend. More than one party has carnal relations with the nurse — and more than one party has designs on the old woman’s life savings. Never once leaving the confines of the baroque, run-down flat that the five souls damn each other in, Tarr executes a non-stop, fragile ballet of mise-en-scène, always framing each of the five as far apart as humanly possible, both in spirit and in the flesh. If you’ve ever been moved by Bela’s style, then Almanac of Fall will wow you in a wholly original and eloquent way.
Dir. Béla Tarr, 1984, 35mm, 119 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Almanac of Fall”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Turin Horse (5/3, 10:15pm)

The Latest (And Last) Film From Bela Tarr!
turinhorse_newsite6
5/3/2012 - 10:15PM

Bela Tarr’s unique ability to wrestle beauty out of the most innocuous, dusty and forlorn corners of the Eastern European landscape reaches a previously unthinkable zenith with The Turin Horse, a distillation of all his themes to date — and a self-proclaimed final cinematic statement. With every single silvery, ultra-stark long take a possible daguerreotype from a Museum of Ancient Anguish, the film presents an aging, stone-faced 19th century farmer, his equally stoic daughter, their work-battered horse, and the impossibly harsh landscape surrounding their meager farmhouse. As the film’s opening windstorm continually rises to new howling, poetic heights, our subjects forge ahead with whatever ritualistic human actions they’re able to perform (a morning shot of liquor, getting water from the well, getting dressed/undressed) in the face of increasingly unending bleakness. This is pure essence du Tarr: an absolute minimum of storyline and an absolute maximum of monolithic detail, providing an ultimate existentialist meditation — and what’s possibly the most terrifying depiction of boiled potatoes ever filmed. It is beautiful, it is brutal, and it is only truly experienced on the big screen.
Dirs. Bela Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011, 35mm, 146 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Turin Horse”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Turin Horse (5/2, 7:30pm)

The Latest (And Last) Film From Bela Tarr
turinhorse_newsite4
5/2/2012 - 7:30PM

Bela Tarr’s unique ability to wrestle beauty out of the most innocuous, dusty and forlorn corners of the Eastern European landscape reaches a previously unthinkable zenith with The Turin Horse, a distillation of all his themes to date — and a self-proclaimed final cinematic statement. With every single silvery, ultra-stark long take a possible daguerreotype from a Museum of Ancient Anguish, the film presents an aging, stone-faced 19th century farmer, his equally stoic daughter, their work-battered horse, and the impossibly harsh landscape surrounding their meager farmhouse. As the film’s opening windstorm continually rises to new howling, poetic heights, our subjects forge ahead with whatever ritualistic human actions they’re able to perform (a morning shot of liquor, getting water from the well, getting dressed/undressed) in the face of increasingly unending bleakness. This is pure essence du Tarr: an absolute minimum of storyline and an absolute maximum of monolithic detail, providing an ultimate existentialist meditation — and what’s possibly the most terrifying depiction of boiled potatoes ever filmed. It is beautiful, it is brutal, and it is only truly experienced on the big screen.
Dirs. Bela Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011, 35mm, 146 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Turin Horse”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Turin Horse (4/30, 7:30pm)

The Latest (And Last) Film From Bela Tarr
turinhorse_newsite3
4/30/2012 - 7:30PM

Bela Tarr’s unique ability to wrestle beauty out of the most innocuous, dusty and forlorn corners of the Eastern European landscape reaches a previously unthinkable zenith with The Turin Horse, a distillation of all his themes to date — and a self-proclaimed final cinematic statement. With every single silvery, ultra-stark long take a possible daguerreotype from a Museum of Ancient Anguish, the film presents an aging, stone-faced 19th century farmer, his equally stoic daughter, their work-battered horse, and the impossibly harsh landscape surrounding their meager farmhouse. As the film’s opening windstorm continually rises to new howling, poetic heights, our subjects forge ahead with whatever ritualistic human actions they’re able to perform (a morning shot of liquor, getting water from the well, getting dressed/undressed) in the face of increasingly unending bleakness. This is pure essence du Tarr: an absolute minimum of storyline and an absolute maximum of monolithic detail, providing an ultimate existentialist meditation — and what’s possibly the most terrifying depiction of boiled potatoes ever filmed. It is beautiful, it is brutal, and it is only truly experienced on the big screen.
Dirs. Bela Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011, 35mm, 146 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Turin Horse”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Turin Horse (4/28, 7:00pm)

The Latest (And Last) Film From Bela Tarr!
turinhorse_newsite2
4/28/2012 - 7PM

Bela Tarr’s unique ability to wrestle beauty out of the most innocuous, dusty and forlorn corners of the Eastern European landscape reaches a previously unthinkable zenith with The Turin Horse, a distillation of all his themes to date — and a self-proclaimed final cinematic statement. With every single silvery, ultra-stark long take a possible daguerreotype from a Museum of Ancient Anguish, the film presents an aging, stone-faced 19th century farmer, his equally stoic daughter, their work-battered horse, and the impossibly harsh landscape surrounding their meager farmhouse. As the film’s opening windstorm continually rises to new howling, poetic heights, our subjects forge ahead with whatever ritualistic human actions they’re able to perform (a morning shot of liquor, getting water from the well, getting dressed/undressed) in the face of increasingly unending bleakness. This is pure essence du Tarr: an absolute minimum of storyline and an absolute maximum of monolithic detail, providing an ultimate existentialist meditation — and what’s possibly the most terrifying depiction of boiled potatoes ever filmed. It is beautiful, it is brutal, and it is only truly experienced on the big screen.
Dirs. Bela Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011, 35mm, 146 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Turin Horse”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Turin Horse (Opening Night Reception!)

The Latest (and Last) Film From Bela Tarr!
turinhorse_newsite1
4/27/2012 - 8PM

Bela Tarr’s unique ability to wrestle beauty out of the most innocuous, dusty and forlorn corners of the Eastern European landscape reaches a previously unthinkable zenith with The Turin Horse, a distillation of all his themes to date — and a self-proclaimed final cinematic statement. With every single silvery, ultra-stark long take a possible daguerreotype from a Museum of Ancient Anguish, the film presents an aging, stone-faced 19th century farmer, his equally stoic daughter, their work-battered horse, and the impossibly harsh landscape surrounding their meager farmhouse. As the film’s opening windstorm continually rises to new howling, poetic heights, our subjects forge ahead with whatever ritualistic human actions they’re able to perform (a morning shot of liquor, getting water from the well, getting dressed/undressed) in the face of increasingly unending bleakness. This is pure essence du Tarr: an absolute minimum of storyline and an absolute maximum of monolithic detail, providing an ultimate existentialist meditation — and what’s possibly the most terrifying depiction of boiled potatoes ever filmed. It is beautiful, it is brutal, and it is only truly experienced on the big screen.
Dirs. Bela Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011, 35mm, 146 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Turin Horse”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Man From London

A philosophical noir parable!
manfromlondon_newsite
4/22/2012 - 3PM

After several years’ absence, Bela Tarr returned to the big screen in 2007 with The Man From London, a philosophical noir parable that, in the hands of another director like Sam Fuller, would play fast ‘n’ rough, but in Tarr’s signature slow-burn style, radiates with a seductive, chilly intensity. The dreary Maloin (played with morbid creakiness by Miroslav Krobot) works at a gloomy seaside port, and catches a sudden murder taking place on a dock. He recovers a mysterious suitcase full of cash abandoned in the bloody struggle — which only worsens his despair-laden life, as the moral implications of keeping the loot weigh on him like concrete loafers. Tarr’s languid, epic takes, upwards of the ten-minute mark (as in the mesmeric opening shot, exploring every inch of the dock before shockingly switching gears to reveal the murderous act), offer stark accompaniment to the story of a man trapped in the ferocious ambience of his own indecision.
Dir. Bela Tarr, 2007, 35mm, 139 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Man From London”!
YouTube Preview Image

Werckmeister Harmonies (4/19, 9:45pm)

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty!
werckmeister_newsite
4/19/2012 - 9:45PM

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty, Béla Tarr’s breakthrough film about chaos descending onto a small Hungarian village is an intellectual and visual juggernaut of near-unmatched power. Through unforgettable imagery that intertwines hope and despair as inseparably as the black and white of the film’s bleakly stunning compositions, Tarr melds all the unalterable monumentality of the cosmos with the small rhythms of our human routines and intrigues. A bar full of haggard drunkards beautifully recreates the dance-like rotations of the solar system — and the stuffed corpse of a whale interrupts the bustling life of the village square with the inescapability of decay, both physical and societal. Throughout it all, Tarr’s trademark long shots (the film is comprised of a mere 35 long-takes), along with his solemnly gliding camera, transform the screen into the equivalent of an oversize hourglass that both mourns and celebrates the unavoidable progress of time, and our place in it. Ultra-rare 35mm print!
Dirs. Béla Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2000, 35mm, 145 min.

Watch excerpts from “Werckmeister Harmonies”!
YouTube Preview Image

Werckmeister Harmonies (4/16, 9:45pm)

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty!
werckmeister_newsite
4/16/2012 - 9:45PM

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty, Béla Tarr’s breakthrough film about chaos descending onto a small Hungarian village is an intellectual and visual juggernaut of near-unmatched power. Through unforgettable imagery that intertwines hope and despair as inseparably as the black and white of the film’s bleakly stunning compositions, Tarr melds all the unalterable monumentality of the cosmos with the small rhythms of our human routines and intrigues. A bar full of haggard drunkards beautifully recreates the dance-like rotations of the solar system — and the stuffed corpse of a whale interrupts the bustling life of the village square with the inescapability of decay, both physical and societal. Throughout it all, Tarr’s trademark long shots (the film is comprised of a mere 35 long-takes), along with his solemnly gliding camera, transform the screen into the equivalent of an oversize hourglass that both mourns and celebrates the unavoidable progress of time, and our place in it. Ultra-rare 35mm print!
Dirs. Béla Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2000, 35mm, 145 min.

Watch excerpts from “Werckmeister Harmonies”!
YouTube Preview Image

Damnation

The stylistic genesis of 1980s Bela Tarr!
damnation_newsite
4/15/2012 - 7PM

“With its decaying factories, dingy bars and bleak, expressionistic landscapes, [Damnation] introduced the dark, rainy and irretrievably melancholy realm that is arguably Tarr’s greatest creation.” — Harvard Film Archive

Desolation never felt so lush! A breakthrough work for its director, this post-apocalyptic Eastern European deadpan dirge is the first of Béla Tarr’s films to use his signature long takes, expounding upon the stylistic hallmarks of Tarkovsky and Jarmusch(!) to become one of the most wholly unique film creations of the 1980s. Damnation’s small-town love triangle between a brooding torch singer, her antisocial lover and her criminal spouse is impeccably framed against the backdrop of a silvery, hazy Hungary reduced to both mental and physical rubble. Utilizing a purposefully simple storyline, Tarr expertly wrenches incredible heights of tension out of even the most ordinary of events; in his world, even the simple act of shaving in front of a mirror takes on a Shakespearian gravitas. Likewise, the sparse diegetic music score by regular Tarr collaborator Mihály Vig (featuring lone accordion lines or tormented nightclub ballads) is used to explosive emotional effect, cutting through the on-screen despair to reach transcendent heights. Pointing the way towards Tarr’s magnum opus Satantango, Damnation is a cinema-altering experience forever etched in the minds of all who bear witness.
Dir. Béla Tarr, 1988, 35mm, 116 min.

Watch excerpts from “Damnation”!
YouTube Preview Image
YouTube Preview Image

Family Nest

The debut feature from Bela Tarr!
familynest_newsite
4/14/2012 - 4:30PM

“Made when he was only 22, Béla Tarr’s first feature recalls both Frederick Wiseman and John Cassavetes in its mix of raw, up-close cinema verité style and imperceptible use of non-professional actors. “We can understand; we can’t help,” the social services employee intones to a desperate mother in an unnervingly realistic episode that encapsulates the cycle of grief and torment experienced by those trapped in Hungary’s housing shortage of the 1970s. Irén and her husband ache to escape the chaotic confines of a tiny flat where nine people live under the reign of an abrasive, abusive patriarch. Rife with all the ills of a demoralized society, the claustrophobic clamor of this “nest” stuns with its penetrating immediacy, occasionally interrupted by incongruous pop music interludes that only lengthen the distance between desire and reality.” — Harvard Film Archive
Dir. Béla Tarr, 1977, 35mm, 100 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Family Nest”!
YouTube Preview Image

Werckmeister Harmonies (4/9, 7:30pm)

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty!
werckmeister_newsite
4/9/2012 - 7:30PM

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty, Béla Tarr’s breakthrough film about chaos descending onto a small Hungarian village is an intellectual and visual juggernaut of near-unmatched power. Through unforgettable imagery that intertwines hope and despair as inseparably as the black and white of the film’s bleakly stunning compositions, Tarr melds all the unalterable monumentality of the cosmos with the small rhythms of our human routines and intrigues. A bar full of haggard drunkards beautifully recreates the dance-like rotations of the solar system — and the stuffed corpse of a whale interrupts the bustling life of the village square with the inescapability of decay, both physical and societal. Throughout it all, Tarr’s trademark long shots (the film is comprised of a mere 35 long-takes), along with his solemnly gliding camera, transform the screen into the equivalent of an oversize hourglass that both mourns and celebrates the unavoidable progress of time, and our place in it. Ultra-rare 35mm print!
Dirs. Béla Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2000, 35mm, 145 min.

Watch excerpts from “Werckmeister Harmonies”!
YouTube Preview Image

Werckmeister Harmonies (4/8, 7:00pm)

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty!
werckmeister_newsite
4/8/2012 - 7PM

A masterpiece of bone-chillingly stark beauty, Béla Tarr’s breakthrough film about chaos descending onto a small Hungarian village is an intellectual and visual juggernaut of near-unmatched power. Through unforgettable imagery that intertwines hope and despair as inseparably as the black and white of the film’s bleakly stunning compositions, Tarr melds all the unalterable monumentality of the cosmos with the small rhythms of our human routines and intrigues. A bar full of haggard drunkards beautifully recreates the dance-like rotations of the solar system — and the stuffed corpse of a whale interrupts the bustling life of the village square with the inescapability of decay, both physical and societal. Throughout it all, Tarr’s trademark long shots (the film is comprised of a mere 35 long-takes), along with his solemnly gliding camera, transform the screen into the equivalent of an oversize hourglass that both mourns and celebrates the unavoidable progress of time, and our place in it. Ultra-rare 35mm print!
Dirs. Béla Tarr & Ágnes Hranitzky, 2000, 35mm, 145 min.

Watch excerpts from “Werckmeister Harmonies”!
YouTube Preview Image

http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org