Special Events - August 2017

Tokyo Drifter

tokyo drifter2
8/21/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the Japan Foundation

Genre-smasher, jazz gangster, captain of cool: with Tokyo Drifter, maverick filmmaker Seijun Suzuki hit an avant-garde high that left an indelible mark on movie history. Tetsuya Watari – a then-massively famous Japanese pop star – is a wandering Yakuza on the run from ruthless, warring gangsters. Sounds like a million crime pictures you’ve seen before, but this is Suzuki at the pinnacle of his radical, individualist, genre reinvention. We are quickly whisked away into a non-linear, surrealist, absurdist landscape; together with Branded to Kill – which led to his termination from Nikkatsu studios – Suzuki crafted a pair of extravagant gangster film fever-dreams. A master of the widescreen (scope) frame, Suzuki uses every trick in the book this side of Godard or Bava – opening in lush black & white before exploding with vibrant neons, epic Spaghetti Western-esque close-ups and saloons, Vincente Minnelli musical numbers – in this veritable feast of stylized pop-art that influenced, among others, Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Dir. Seijun Suzuki, 1966, 35mm, 83 min.

Tokyo Drifter

tokyo drifter
8/20/2017 - 10PM

Co-presented by the Japan Foundation

Genre-smasher, jazz gangster, captain of cool: with Tokyo Drifter, maverick filmmaker Seijun Suzuki hit an avant-garde high that left an indelible mark on movie history. Tetsuya Watari – a then-massively famous Japanese pop star – is a wandering Yakuza on the run from ruthless, warring gangsters. Sounds like a million crime pictures you’ve seen before, but this is Suzuki at the pinnacle of his radical, individualist, genre reinvention. We are quickly whisked away into a non-linear, surrealist, absurdist landscape; together with Branded to Kill – which led to his termination from Nikkatsu studios – Suzuki crafted a pair of extravagant gangster film fever-dreams. A master of the widescreen (scope) frame, Suzuki uses every trick in the book this side of Godard or Bava – opening in lush black & white before exploding with vibrant neons, epic Spaghetti Western-esque close-ups and saloons, Vincente Minnelli musical numbers – in this veritable feast of stylized pop-art that influenced, among others, Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Dir. Seijun Suzuki, 1966, 35mm, 83 min.

Get Rollin'

get rollin 3
8/19/2017 - 10PM

Co-presented by Cinespia

This joyous and fascinating tribute to the glory days of roller disco in Brooklyn’s black community was nearly lost for almost 40 years, but is now ripe for rediscovery. Independently made by a young black director (J. Terrance Mitchell), Get Rollin made the NY Times Top 10 list, but after a botched release, it missed the disco craze, and sank into obscurity. Looking at it now, Get Rollin is more vibrant than ever: an eclectic potpourri of neon-drenched documentary snapshots that capture the scene around the famed Empire Rollerdome, and a fantastic portrait of vintage New York – including street crap games, Bed-Stuy pool halls, and a custom van show. All this is staged around a kitchen-sink storyline starring “Pat the Cat,” a self-made roller disco cowboy, and a caseworker named Vinzerelli, who wants to be the Muhammad Ali of roller boogie – and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records as the first roller skater to make a million dollars. “But then,” he tells the camera from inside his shag-carpet-ensconced, airbrush-laden hippie van, from the other side of rose-lensed aviators, “I realized, ‘but I can’t skate.’” It’s all outrageously fun, and filled with a spirit as optimistic as this magical time and place where it was cool and sexy to do synchronized dance moves and wear sunglasses indoors.

Dir. J. Terrance Mitchell, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Get Rollin'

get rollin 2
8/18/2017 - 10PM

Co-presented by Cinespia

This joyous and fascinating tribute to the glory days of roller disco in Brooklyn’s black community was nearly lost for almost 40 years, but is now ripe for rediscovery. Independently made by a young black director (J. Terrance Mitchell), Get Rollin made the NY Times Top 10 list, but after a botched release, it missed the disco craze, and sank into obscurity. Looking at it now, Get Rollin is more vibrant than ever: an eclectic potpourri of neon-drenched documentary snapshots that capture the scene around the famed Empire Rollerdome, and a fantastic portrait of vintage New York – including street crap games, Bed-Stuy pool halls, and a custom van show. All this is staged around a kitchen-sink storyline starring “Pat the Cat,” a self-made roller disco cowboy, and a caseworker named Vinzerelli, who wants to be the Muhammad Ali of roller boogie – and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records as the first roller skater to make a million dollars. “But then,” he tells the camera from inside his shag-carpet-ensconced, airbrush-laden hippie van, from the other side of rose-lensed aviators, “I realized, ‘but I can’t skate.’” It’s all outrageously fun, and filled with a spirit as optimistic as this magical time and place where it was cool and sexy to do synchronized dance moves and wear sunglasses indoors.

Dir. J. Terrance Mitchell, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean

PlasticD-1966-2
8/18/2017 - 7:30PM

Presented by Don’t Knock the Rock and Women of Cinefamily!

Introduced by KJ Relth, Programming Assistant at the UCLA Film and Television Archive, and Maya Montañez Smukler, film historian and author of “Liberating Hollywood: Thirty Years of Women Directors.”

This rare 60s gem was famously impossible to see for decades – unavailable on VHS, DVD, bootleg DVD, torrent, or punk rock 16mm collectors print. Scour the internet, and all you’ll find is a weird ad for it on a double bill of THE HARDER THEY COME, and an obscure reference by Stephen Colbert on The Colbert Report.

“Written, directed, and self-financed by Juleen Compton, The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean is the story of a clairvoyant teenage girl, Norma Jean (Sharon Henesy), taken advantage of by a boy band, fashioned after The Beatles, determined to exploit the young woman’s powers as part of a hoax revival. Filmed in the Ozarks with a cast of young, unknown actors (a 25-year-old Sam Waterston co-stars in his first film appearance), the picture’s opening title sequence — the two young leads walking through a bucolic setting with Michel Legrand’s sentimental score — suggests a tender tale about a pair of young companions. However, the movie quickly takes an unusual turn when Norma Jean and her friend Vance (Robert Gentry) pick up an enormous plastic dome they’ve ordered. Stylistically accomplished, the movie is an impressive example of American independent feature filmmaking during the mid-1960s and an uncommon portrayal, for the time, of female agency. During the 1970s, Compton moved to Los Angeles in hopes of directing features in Hollywood. Frustrated with Hollywood’s sexist hiring practices, she returned to New York City during the 1990s to run a successful off-Broadway theater company.” –Maya Montañez Smukler

Dir. Juleen Compton, 1966, 35mm, 82 min.

35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive.

Get Rollin' (with director J. Terrance Mitchell in person!)

get rollin
8/16/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by Cinespia

This joyous and fascinating tribute to the glory days of roller disco in Brooklyn’s black community was nearly lost for almost 40 years, but is now ripe for rediscovery. Independently made by a young black director (J. Terrance Mitchell), Get Rollin made the NY Times Top 10 list, but after a botched release, it missed the disco craze, and sank into obscurity. Looking at it now, Get Rollin is more vibrant than ever: an eclectic potpourri of neon-drenched documentary snapshots that capture the scene around the famed Empire Rollerdome, and a fantastic portrait of vintage New York – including street crap games, Bed-Stuy pool halls, and a custom van show. All this is staged around a kitchen-sink storyline starring “Pat the Cat,” a self-made roller disco cowboy, and a caseworker named Vinzerelli, who wants to be the Muhammad Ali of roller boogie – and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records as the first roller skater to make a million dollars. “But then,” he tells the camera from inside his shag-carpet-ensconced, airbrush-laden hippie van, from the other side of rose-lensed aviators, “I realized, ‘but I can’t skate.’” It’s all outrageously fun, and filled with a spirit as optimistic as this magical time and place where it was cool and sexy to do synchronized dance moves and wear sunglasses indoors.

Dir. J. Terrance Mitchell, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Super Tight Presents: Snowy Bing Bongs LA Premiere + Reggie Watts live

Screen Shot 2016-02-17 at 4.41.58 PM
8/15/2017 - 7:30PM

With a DJ set by Nina Tarr

LA premiere with directors Alex Huston Fischer & Rachel Wolther in person!

Dance-comedy trio Cocoon Central Dance Team star in this charmingly uncategorizable film. In their roles as the Bing Bongs, Tallie Medel, Sunita Mani & Eleanore Pienta perform playful, otherworldly routines in a psychedelic, fantasy landscape. “Part psychotropic performance art spectacle, part absurdist sketch show… It all plays like a live action cartoon piped in from a cotton-candy-colored alternate universe” (BAMcinemafest).

The film will be followed by a Q&A with the directors, moderated by Reggie Watts, and a live performance by Cocoon Central themselves!

Plus a live performance by Reggie Watts!

Dirs. Alex Huston Fischer & Rachel Wolther, 2017, 40 min.

A Life in Waves (encore!)

lifeinwaves2
8/14/2017 - 10:30PM

Whether you know it or not – you’re familiar with the work of Suzanne Ciani. Her accolades range from “pioneering electronic musician” to “America’s first female synth hero” to being the first solo female composer to soundtrack a Hollywood film (Lily Tomlin’s The Incredible Shrinking Woman, that is) but that doesn’t even begin to cover her most widely distributed work – ads. Ciani was an incredibly talented artist, crafting lush, romantic, classically-influenced electronic music during what was the heydey of Tangerine Dream and the period that marked the emergence of “New Age” as a category, but she was also a savvy business woman, and funded her creative endeavors with the production of sounds for advertisements and products – from the famous Coca-cola “pop and pour” to pinball games galore. Brett Whitcomb’s intimate, reflective portrait takes us through Suzanne’s career – from her first encounters with a piano to her relationship with her beloved Buchla synthesizer – all to the tune of Ciani’s own compositions.

Dir. Brett Whitcomb, 2017, DCP, 74 min.

Watch the trailer!

How to Build a Time Machine (Q&A with director Jay Cheel moderated by Matt Gourley of Drunk History)

timemachine.jpg.CROP.promo-mediumlarge
8/13/2017 - 7:30PM

An investigation of childhood obsession, movie magic, and the pursuit of space-twisting, inter-dimensional crusades. Rob Niosi, a stop-motion animator, has spent over a decade building an exact replica of Rod Taylor’s device in 1960′s H.G. Wells adaptation The Time Machine. Dr. Ron Mallett, a physics professor at the University of Connecticut (and subject of a long-gestating Spike Lee film), was moved by Wells’ novel to go back in time and save his father from a fatal heart attack. How to Build a Time Machine traces the lives of these men – their processes, fixations, and dreams – and the divergent paths that Wells’ work inspired them to take. Much like Room 237 – the 2012 doc about Stanley Kubrick conspiracy theorists – How to Build a Time Machine explores how our lives intertwine with movies just as much as it considers the prospect of shooting lasers into space.

Dir. Jay Cheel, 2017, DCP, 82 min.

Watch the trailer!

Secret Movie Club presents Freaks (Off-site at the Vista)

freaks1
8/11/2017 - MIDNITE

The Secret Movie Club presents Freaks at the Vista, located at 4473 Sunset Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

A whole generation of midnight moviegoers and cult film fans were weaned on this most disturbing of visions, and the true feather in the horror hat of Tod Browning (director of Dracula). Browning employed real “sideshow professionals” to tell this tale of betrayal and murder in the world of carnival freakshows. Here the freaks take center stage, and the result is startling, provocative and wholly sympathetic to its titular creatures. From cavorting microcephalic “pinheads” to a limbless human torso slithering under a carnival wagon en route to a murder, Freaks packs a wallop that still holds up even in our cynical, seen-it-all times.

Dir. Tod Browning, 1932, 35mm, 64 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

A Life in Waves (encore!)

lifeinwaves1
8/11/2017 - 7:30PM

Whether you know it or not – you’re familiar with the work of Suzanne Ciani. Her accolades range from “pioneering electronic musician” to “America’s first female synth hero” to being the first solo female composer to soundtrack a Hollywood film (Lily Tomlin’s The Incredible Shrinking Woman, that is) but that doesn’t even begin to cover her most widely distributed work – ads. Ciani was an incredibly talented artist, crafting lush, romantic, classically-influenced electronic music during what was the heydey of Tangerine Dream and the period that marked the emergence of “New Age” as a category, but she was also a savvy business woman, and funded her creative endeavors with the production of sounds for advertisements and products – from the famous Coca-cola “pop and pour” to pinball games galore. Brett Whitcomb’s intimate, reflective portrait takes us through Suzanne’s career – from her first encounters with a piano to her relationship with her beloved Buchla synthesizer – all to the tune of Ciani’s own compositions.

Dir. Brett Whitcomb, 2017, DCP, 74 min.

Watch the trailer!

Batman: Mask of the Phantasm

MOTP2
8/8/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by Warner Archive in celebration of Batman: Mask of the Phantasm’s Blu-ray release!

Ask any Batman fan what they consider the definitive take on the caped crusader, and 9 out of 10 will name Bruce Timm’s groundbreaking Batman: The Animated Series. At its peak in 1992, the team of Timm and Eric Radomski brought the series’ beautifully realized noir aesthetic to the big screen with the feature-length Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, delivering what is now held up as a canonical and essential Batman story. Series regulars Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill (who would have imagined Luke Skywalker would make for the ideal Joker?) carry over their impeccable voice over work, aided by superlative character voices Stacy Keach, Dana Delaney , Abe Vigoda, Hart Bochner and Dick Miller, bringing to life the story of Batman’s psychologically-charged showdown with a terrifying new enemy, Phantasm. To the Batcave, aka Cinefamily!

Dirs. Bruce Timm & Eric Radomski, 1992, 35mm, 76 min.

Batman: Mask of the Phantasm

MOTP
8/7/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by Warner Archive in celebration of Batman: Mask of the Phantasm’s Blu-ray release!

Ask any Batman fan what they consider the definitive take on the caped crusader, and 9 out of 10 will name Bruce Timm’s groundbreaking Batman: The Animated Series. At its peak in 1992, the team of Timm and Eric Radomski brought the series’ beautifully realized noir aesthetic to the big screen with the feature-length Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, delivering what is now held up as a canonical and essential Batman story. Series regulars Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill (who would have imagined Luke Skywalker would make for the ideal Joker?) carry over their impeccable voice over work, aided by superlative character voices Stacy Keach, Dana Delaney , Abe Vigoda, Hart Bochner and Dick Miller, bringing to life the story of Batman’s psychologically-charged showdown with a terrifying new enemy, Phantasm. To the Batcave, aka Cinefamily!

Dirs. Bruce Timm & Eric Radomski, 1992, 35mm, 76 min.

Batman: Mask of the Phantasm

batman
8/5/2017 - 2PM

Co-presented by Warner Archive in celebration of Batman: Mask of the Phantasm’s Blu-ray release!

Ask any Batman fan what they consider the definitive take on the caped crusader, and 9 out of 10 will name Bruce Timm’s groundbreaking Batman: The Animated Series. At its peak in 1992, the team of Timm and Eric Radomski brought the series’ beautifully realized noir aesthetic to the big screen with the feature-length Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, delivering what is now held up as a canonical and essential Batman story. Series regulars Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill (who would have imagined Luke Skywalker would make for the ideal Joker?) carry over their impeccable voice over work, aided by superlative character voices Stacy Keach, Dana Delaney , Abe Vigoda, Hart Bochner and Dick Miller, bringing to life the story of Batman’s psychologically-charged showdown with a terrifying new enemy, Phantasm. To the Batcave, aka Cinefamily!

Dirs. Bruce Timm & Eric Radomski, 1992, 35mm, 76 min.

A Life in Waves (w/ director Brett Whitcomb, producer Bradford Thomason, and Suzanne Ciani in person!)

Portrait_28_1333491558_crop_550x400
8/3/2017 - 7:30PM

Presented by Don’t Knock the Rock and Boiler Room

Whether you know it or not – you’re familiar with the work of Suzanne Ciani. Her accolades range from “pioneering electronic musician” to “America’s first female synth hero” to being the first solo female composer to soundtrack a Hollywood film (Lily Tomlin’s The Incredible Shrinking Woman, that is) but that doesn’t even begin to cover her most widely distributed work – ads. Ciani was an incredibly talented artist, crafting lush, romantic, classically-influenced electronic music during what was the heydey of Tangerine Dream and the period that marked the emergence of “New Age” as a category, but she was also a savvy business woman, and funded her creative endeavors with the production of sounds for advertisements and products – from the famous Coca-cola “pop and pour” to pinball games galore. Brett Whitcomb’s intimate, reflective portrait takes us through Suzanne’s career – from her first encounters with a piano to her relationship with her beloved Buchla synthesizer – all to the tune of Ciani’s own compositions.

Dir. Brett Whitcomb, 2017, DCP, 74 min.

Watch the trailer!

http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org