La Collectionneuse presents: Olivier Assayas




Olivier Assayas joins Cinefamily for a weekend in celebration of his newest film, Personal Shopper. The son of a filmmaker (Jacques Rémy), Assayas got his start in filmmaking after writing for Cahiers du cinéma, in the tradition of Godard, Truffaut and Chabrol. But he was of a different generation than the venerable elders of Cahiers, as is strikingly apparent in his films’ unique portraits of an increasingly globalized world. This weekend, Assayas will take us inside his influences, presenting the work of some of his favorite filmmakers – Guy Debord and Bo Widerberg – and a program of his own rare shorts and music films (with Kim Gordon in person). Also featuring a screening of his own rarely screened meta-film, Irma Vep (in a new DCP restoration). Additional Assayas titles to screen throughout March.


Special thanks to Aude Hesbert, Sylvie Barthet, and Ryan Werner.



Presented by La Collectionneuse
Follow us on Facebook!
Follow us on Instagram!
Follow us on Twitter!

Eldorado

Eldorado
3/29/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“A dance about a piece of music within a film about dance.” -FIAF

With made-for-TV documentary Eldorado, filmmaker Olivier Assayas has completely redefined our expectations of what it means to be awestruck by a piece of art. Assayas’s vibrant, meditative picture pulls back the curtain on the collaborative creative process to reveal two masters of their craft working together toward a common goal: producing an avant-garde, contemporary ballet. His camera and its perfect frames shift between the rehearsal studio of French choreographer Angelin Preljocaj and the recording laboratory of legendary German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen (a mad scientist-level genius who once claimed to have been born on a planet orbiting a nearby star Sirius). Much like the mythical city that gives the ballet – and the film – its name, Assayas has discovered an intangible alchemy between choreographer, composer, and filmmaker. There’s nothing quite like watching commanding innovators speak the same language about distinct artist practices, but Preljocaj and Stockhausen’s synergized revelations – not to mention their remarkably distinct final product, which we are granted the privilege of watching performed in its entirety – make for one of the most captivating documentations of the organic creative process in recent memory.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2008, Digibeta, 102 min.

Clean

CleanA10
3/26/2017 - 4:45PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

The world revealed in Olivier Assayas’ films – cosmopolitan, kinetic, and ever-shrinking – has never felt more personal than it does in 2004‘s Clean, a wrenching and redemptive portrait of addiction. Clean finds the director working again with Irma Vep star Maggie Cheung (whose bracing multi-lingual performance earned a Best Actress award at Cannes) to tell the story of Emily, a former junkie struggling to collect the fragments of her life after the overdose of her rock-star lover. Aided by Eric Gautier’s brilliant, restless handheld cinematography, Assayas propels Cheung through crowded rock clubs, bustling restaurants and the dense urban landscapes of Paris and London, drawing both on her emotional depth and on the singular physicality that made her a Hong Kong action star. Perfectly cast as her bereaved father-in-law, Nick Nolte balances her desperation with wounded stoicism; the study in vulnerability that emerges between them is one of Assayas’ starkest and most moving.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2004, 35mm, 111 min.

Demonlover

Demonlover-feature-1600x900-c-default
3/25/2017 - 9:45PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Critically maligned after it was unleashed upon the 2002 Cannes Film Festival, Assayas’ underseen, ice-cold cyber thriller hurtles 100 MPH down the transgressive path toward New French Extremity. The ruthless relations of international business and a grab-bag of post-9/11, globalized industry set the stage upon which Demonlover’s 3-D animated porn-slinging players – including the frigid Connie Nielsen, alluring Gina Gershon, and a French-speaking Chloe Sevigny – connive, drug, threaten, and seduce their way toward ultimate financial control over one salacious, interactive product. The characters’ attempts to navigate this confused conflation of power-hungry nations is mirrored in the film’s spectacularly schizophrenic soundtrack of heavy and black metal (Soulfly, Darkthrone), English electro-rock (Goldfrapp, Death in Vegas), and millennial post-punk (Sonic Youth contributes eight songs) for a time capsule of a sonic ride through this uncertain, newly paved, intangible terrain. We’re not entirely sure what Jean Baudrillard would think about Assayas’ neo-noir for a burgeoning digital age and its ever-present reminder of our slow, blind march into the simulacra – but he would certainly have choice phrases about the despicable culture Assayas so brutally predicts.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2002, 35mm, 129 min.

Noise

image-w448
3/18/2017 - 10:45PM

In 2005, Assayas was given carte blanche to curate the Art Rock Festival in St. Brieuc, one of France’s most prestigious concert-series (and a forefather of American festivals like Pitchfork’s Basilica Soundscape). So, camera in tow, he enlisted the help of his frequent co-conspirators and friends Sonic Youth, Metric, Afel Bocoum, Lee Ranaldo, Marie Modiano, and more, for an evening of total sonic and visual avant-punk. Assayas filmed and edited the concert like a Woodstock cameraman versed in Brakhage, and contributed several original experimental films for rear projection during Sonic Youth (performing as Mirror/Dash)’s set. Cinefamily presents a rare screening of this tour-de-force experiment in sound and image, previously only released on video in France.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2006, Digibeta, 120min.

Irma Vep (encore!)

Irma Vep 11
3/12/2017 - 10:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Olivier Assayas broke through internationally with his jazzy decoupage Irma Vep. Not content with documentary realism, Assayas introduced New Wave flourishes into this behind-the-scenes story, which follows actress Maggie Cheung (playing a fictionalized version of herself) as she navigates the screaming insecurities and general dysfunction of a French film set. Venerable auteur Rene Vidal (New Wave darling Jean-Pierre Leaud) casts her as the lead in his remake of the Louis Feuillade’s Les Vampires. However, not everyone on the production agrees with his radical casting choice, or anything else for that matter; Cheung is subjected to petty squabbles, ego clashes, and a tightly stitched black latex body suit. Assayas drew upon the avant-garde, Hong Kong action movies, and silent shorts – infusing these styles with signature rhythm and deft vision, crafting an inspired pop filmmaking masterpiece. Newly restored!

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1996, DCP restoration, 99 min.

Clouds of Sils Maria

o-CLOUDS-OF-SILS-facebook
3/6/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Kristen Stewart, not to be outdone by Twilight co-star Robert Pattinson’s partnership with David Cronenberg, set the arthouse world on fire with Clouds of Sils Maria, her first film with legendary French auteur Olivier Assayas (she also stars in his newest film, Personal Shopper, leading all of us to hope that the two keep working together). Stewart is the personal assistant to an international film star, played by the great Juliette Binoche; after the death of a playwright friend, the two ensconce themselves in his remote mountain home to rehearse lines. Barriers between the reality of their relationship, the fantasy of the play, and the world of the film itself quickly begin to blur. By the time Chloë Grace Moretz appears in a film-within-the-film as a gold leather-clad sci-fi warrior, well, things could get weirder. For Assayas fans, Clouds is a visual and emotional feast – and one of his most accomplished films in years. For newcomers, prepare for total cinematic envelopment as Kristen Stewart drives through the winding roads of Sils Maria set to Primal Scream.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2014, DCP, 123min

Irma Vep (with Olivier Assayas in person)

irmavep-908
3/5/2017 - 8PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Olivier Assayas broke through internationally with his jazzy decoupage Irma Vep. Not content with documentary realism, Assayas introduced New Wave flourishes into this behind-the-scenes story, which follows actress Maggie Cheung (playing a fictionalized version of herself) as she navigates the screaming insecurities and general dysfunction of a French film set. Venerable auteur Rene Vidal (New Wave darling Jean-Pierre Leaud) casts her as the lead in his remake of the Louis Feuillade’s Les Vampires. However, not everyone on the production agrees with his radical casting choice, or anything else for that matter; Cheung is subjected to petty squabbles, ego clashes, and a tightly stitched black latex body suit. Assayas drew upon the avant-garde, Hong Kong action movies, and silent shorts – infusing these styles with signature rhythm and deft vision, crafting an inspired pop filmmaking masterpiece. Newly restored!

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1996, DCP restoration, 99 min.

Screens with Man Yuk: A Portrait of Maggie Cheung
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1997, digibeta, 5 min.

Adalen 31 (with Olivier Assayas in person)

adalen
3/5/2017 - 5PM

Pre and post screening DJ set by Mark Wright from Décadanse Soirée

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“Widerberg tells the film as gracefully as the impressionist painters” – Olivier Assayas

Bo Widerberg’s Adalen 31 is a seminal work by one of Sweden’s most seminal filmmakers. Winner of a Special Jury prize at Cannes in 1969, it is a gorgeous ode to the workers who striked, struggled, in some cases died in the 1931 Adalen Riots – a historical confrontation between the military and labour demonstrators that ended in tragedy, but paved the way for worker’s rights in the following century. Widerberg is sometimes called the anti-Bergman, because he is more concerned with man’s relationship with his fellow man, than his relationship with God. Serious as the subject is, Widerberg finds charm and humanity in the day to day lives of his town of sawmill workers, who must while away the weeks, hungry and out of work, waiting for a new era to come. By finding a light touch – with cinematic grace galore – Widerberg transmits the emotional power of their struggle with strength. Shown in 35mm, with an imported print from the Swedish Film Institute.

Dir. Bo Widerberg, 1969, 35mm, 110 min.

Rare shorts & music films (with Olivier Assayas and Kim Gordon in person)

WinstonTong5
3/4/2017 - 9:30PM

Pre and post reception DJ set by Jim Smith from The Smell

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Emerging as a filmmaker in the 80s, Assayas’s early work coincided with the explosion of punk and subsequent post-punk music and culture. Assayas presents a selection of his rare shorts and music films, including a portrait of Winston Tong (of Tuxedomoon), music videos for French pop musician Jacno, and Hotel Atithi – a collage composed for Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore and named for a Mumbai hotel. With Kim Gordon in person.

Hotel Atithi
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2005, digibeta, 35 min.

Winston Tong en studio
Dir Olivier Assayas, 1984, 35mm, 10 min.

Rectangle – Deux chansons de Jacno
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1980, digibeta, 8 min.

Laissé inachevé à Tokyo
Dir Olivier Assayas, 1982, digital presentation, 22 min.

Segment from omnibus film Paris je t’aime
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2006, digibeta.

The Films of Guy Debord (with Olivier Assayas in person)

6706536_orig
3/4/2017 - 6:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Olivier Assayas was 13 in May ‘68. Growing up in the Paris of the 70s and precociously political, he was absorbed in the work of writer, filmmaker, and founding member of the Situationist International Guy Debord (notably, of La société du spectacle fame). Assayas presents two underrated and underseen films by Guy Debord: Critique de la separation and In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

Assayas on Debord:
“Debord published his Collected Cinematographic Works in 1980, I think, and then I read it. I had not seen the short films. No one had seen them. I had no idea—even remotely—what they looked like. I had read them and I loved them. And at the end, there was a text with a description of the new film. So basically, when In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni (We Spin Around the Night Consumed by the Fire) opened, I had already read the whole texts a couple of times. And when I saw the film, for me it was simply one of the meaningful modern works of art I had come across, at any level.”

Critique de la separation
Dir. Guy Debord, 1961, digital presentation, 20 min.

In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni
Dir. Guy Debord, 1978, digital presentation, 100 min.

http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org