Nobuhiko Obayashi: Schoolgirls In The Crosshairs

Co-presented by the Japan Foundation Los Angeles and Japan Film Festival Los Angeles

 

 

Prepare to meet one of the most seismically influential Japanese film artists of the last fifty years. We’re talking a bounty of innovative, straight-up masterfully strange work in the widely varied realms of the experimental underground, the 30-second TV ad spot and the pop feature film; Nobuhiko Obayashi is indeed not only the pure genius that birthed the cult favorite House, but also iconic Japanese commercials with the likes of Charles Bronson, and Godard-like 8mm mini-masterpieces. In an extremely rare Stateside appearance, Nobuhiko-san will hang out with us for a two-day session (featuring a 35mm screening of House, and an in-depth Q&A the following night covering his entire career) — plus we'll be hosting a heaping handful of his most brain-busting works from throughout the '70s and '80s! Special thanks to Marc Walkow and Nicholas Rucka.

 

BUY TICKETS (“House Party”: all tickets $18-$100. All other shows: $12/free for members. Showtimes subject to change):
————————————————————————————————–
OBAYASHI'S “HOUSE PARTY” (director in person!)
Wednesday, May 8th – 8:00pm

 

AN EVENING WITH NOBUHIKO OBAYASHI (director in person!)
Thursday, May 9th – 7:30pm

 

HOUSE (encore screenings!)
Thursday, May 9th – 10:15pm
Tuesday, May 28th – 11:00pm

 

THE DRIFTING CLASSROOM
Saturday, May 11th – midnight
Friday, May 17th – 10:00pm

 

SCHOOL IN THE CROSSHAIRS
Saturday, May 18th – 10:00pm
Thursday, May 23rd – 7:30pm

 

THE GIRL WHO LEAPT THROUGH TIME
Saturday, May 25th – 10:00pm
Sunday, May 26th – 7:30pm

 

Watch Cinefamily's original trailer for “Nobuhiko Obayashi: Schoolgirls in the Crosshairs”!

 

House (encore show!)

house_website
5/28/2013 - 11PM

A delirious pop-horror fantasy from one of Japan’s foremost cult filmmakers, House could be the most legendary horror film you’ve never seen. Former experimental filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi twists ghost story expectations inside-out by utilizing a multi-colored candy-coated visual style that pulls equally from TV commercials, soap operas and the avant-garde. The plot, such as it is, follows Oshare (Kimiko Ikegami) and six schoolgirls as they take an ill-advised summer trip to visit her spinster aunt. Obayashi uses the thin story to cram in as many dazzling experimental effects as the human retina can absorb. Humans turn into piles of bananas, pianos devour their players, animated demons spew blood and appendages — House is a gleeful melee that smashes genres together with more force than the Hadron Collider!
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1977, 35mm, 88 min.

Watch the trailer for “House”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (5/26)

The sensitive side of Obayashi!
girltime09
5/26/2013 - 10:15PM

Showing a more sensitive (yet no less wildly inventive) side of his creative persona, Nobuhiko Obayashi brings forth this teenage time travel tale — one that plays out as if Charlie Kaufman and Philip K. Dick had collaborated on a gentle tale of adolescent female angst sung to the tune of Groundhog Day. One of the many adaptations of the popular Japanese sci-fi source novel across the fields of manga, live-action and animation, the film stars ‘80s teen idol Tomoyo Harada as a quiet schoolgirl mysteriously entangled in a Moebius strip of temporal love triangle wonkiness. Working in a more restrained vein than the balls-to-the-wall, non-stop freakout mode of House, Obayashi nevertheless weaves in a sizeable amount of experimental film technique, optical printing and Magritte-like conceptual imagery — delivering a satisfying dose of impossible-to-categorize entertainment in the process. And don’t forget to stick around through to the closing of the end credits!
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1983, 35mm, 104 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “The Girl Who Leapt Through Time”!

Casting Blossoms To The Sky

The latest film from the director of House!
castingblossoms_website
5/26/2013 - 4PM

The latest epic from the director of House! “Nobuhiko Obayashi still remains impressively productive for his advanced age and, more importantly, is capable of proving he is still full of surprises. Over the course of its breathless 160 minutes, [Casting Blossoms] uses a reporter’s desire to visit the city of Nagaoka as a framework for its nearly essay-like exploration of the city’s links to WWII, and personal accounts of those who survived the destructive events of the past (with some of the real-life inspirations behind certain characters making onscreen appearances). Jumping from speaker to speaker at hot-potato speeds and virtually pelting the viewers with facts and stories, Obayashi weaves together the hidden details of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing operations, incendiary bombing incidents, Pearl Harbor, the art of firework creation, a young student’s ambitious theatrical production and more into an exhilarating and touching cinematic symphony. The daring, dreamlike imagery only sweetens the deal, often reaching pulse-quickening heights — who could ever forget the sight of a group of uniformed students perched upright on their unicycles coasting across the frame in single-file along a country road?” — Marc Saint-Cyr, J-Film Pow-Wow
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 2012, digital presentation, 160 min.

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (5/25)

The sensitive side of Obayashi!
girl_clock_time
5/25/2013 - 10PM

Showing a more sensitive (yet no less wildly inventive) side of his creative persona, Nobuhiko Obayashi brings forth this teenage time travel tale — one that plays out as if Charlie Kaufman and Philip K. Dick had collaborated on a gentle tale of adolescent female angst sung to the tune of Groundhog Day. One of the many adaptations of the popular Japanese sci-fi source novel across the fields of manga, live-action and animation, the film stars ‘80s teen idol Tomoyo Harada as a quiet schoolgirl mysteriously entangled in a Moebius strip of temporal love triangle wonkiness. Working in a more restrained vein than the balls-to-the-wall, non-stop freakout mode of House, Obayashi nevertheless weaves in a sizeable amount of experimental film technique, optical printing and Magritte-like conceptual imagery — delivering a satisfying dose of impossible-to-categorize entertainment in the process. And don’t forget to stick around through to the closing of the end credits!
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1983, 35mm, 104 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “The Girl Who Leapt Through Time”!

School in the Crosshairs (5/23)

A hyper-comical juggernaut of teen nonsense!
school-in-the-crosshairs-web1
5/23/2013 - 7:30PM

When one gets hooked on House — where to turn to for the next immediate fix? The undisputable answer: School In The Crosshairs (aka The Aimed School), the 1981 phantasmagoria of light, sound, optical printing, dance numbers, exemplary sportsmanship, pubescent upskirt mania and extraterrestrial grudge matches wherein the battle for the balance of the universe is waged on the grounds of a prep school. With tanker trucks full of flair, Nobuhiko Obayashi weaves an ultra-dense web of teen nonsense; like a cross between John Hughes and Robert Altman, School In The Crosshairs tracks a humungous, Nashville-esque level of interweaving, bizarro characterizations. One of the many grand pleasures this hyper-comical juggernaut exudes is watching the vast array of its kooky denizens bounce off each other like fizzy electrons. When it’s mellow, you’ve got a touching portrait of adolescent longing — and when the drugs kick in, the all-out lysergic SFX storm washes over you, and it’s like every lava lamp in the world just erupted all over you.
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1981, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “School In The Crosshairs”!

School in the Crosshairs (5/18)

A hyper-comical juggernaut of teen nonsense!
school-in-the-crosshairs-4web
5/18/2013 - 10PM

When one gets hooked on House — where to turn to for the next immediate fix? The undisputable answer: School In The Crosshairs (aka The Aimed School), the 1981 phantasmagoria of light, sound, optical printing, dance numbers, exemplary sportsmanship, pubescent upskirt mania and extraterrestrial grudge matches wherein the battle for the balance of the universe is waged on the grounds of a prep school. With tanker trucks full of flair, Nobuhiko Obayashi weaves an ultra-dense web of teen nonsense; like a cross between John Hughes and Robert Altman, School In The Crosshairs tracks a humungous, Nashville-esque level of interweaving, bizarro characterizations. One of the many grand pleasures this hyper-comical juggernaut exudes is watching the vast array of its kooky denizens bounce off each other like fizzy electrons. When it’s mellow, you’ve got a touching portrait of adolescent longing — and when the drugs kick in, the all-out lysergic SFX storm washes over you, and it’s like every lava lamp in the world just erupted all over you.
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1981, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “School In The Crosshairs”!

The Drifting Classroom

Never released on DVD, even in Japan!
drifting_classroom2_480x309
5/17/2013 - 10PM

Never released on DVD — even in Japan! For the lucky ducks reading this who’ve seen Nobuhiko Obayashi’s masterpiece House, you know that the man knows how to make a crazy movie. The normal language of film you’re accustomed to is left for dead, with virtually every aesthetic choice being completely hypnotic and magical. Loooosely based on the manga by visionary Kazuo Umezu (“Cat Eyed Boy”), The Drifting Classroom’s “international high school” is populated by a ragtag team of Annie-esque English-speaking kids of all stripes. During an impromptu jam session of “Here Comes The Bride”(?!), a tornado hurls the entire school into an alternate dimension time-slip — and as the baffled students and faculty (led by ‘50s teen idol Troy Donahue) navigate through a desert wasteland, giant bugs tear through the children like twigs, a gripping madness immediately sets in with the children, and hell breaks loose at every turn! With an impossible Neverending Story-meets-Twilight Zone vibe, the fantastic and the bleak blend together beautifully with this baby; this one is so face-melting your head will be a panini by the time it’s over.
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1987, digital presentation, 104 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for The Drifting Classroom! NOTE: this trailer contains our original “Video Nights” showdate of Saturday, May 11th. This encore screening will take place on Friday, May 18th.

OFF-SITE: Obayashi's "Casting Blossoms To The Sky" @ Miyako Hybrid Hotel

The newest film by Nobuhiko Obayashi!
castingblossoms_website
5/12/2013 - 2:30PM

Presented by Japan Film Festival Los Angeles. LOCATION: Miyako Hybrid Hotel, 21381 S. Western Avenue, Torrance, CA, 90501.

Join House filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi in person, as he presents his latest feature film, Casting Blossoms To The Sky, as well as a Q&A after the film, as part of Japan Film Festival Los Angeles’s 2013 program!

VIDEO NIGHTS: The Drifting Classroom

Never released on DVD, even in Japan!
drifting_classroom2_480x309
5/11/2013 - 11:59PM

Never released on DVD — even in Japan! For the lucky ducks reading this who’ve seen Nobuhiko Obayashi’s masterpiece House, you know that the man knows how to make a crazy movie. The normal language of film you’re accustomed to is left for dead, with virtually every aesthetic choice being completely hypnotic and magical. Loooosely based on the manga by visionary Kazuo Umezu (“Cat Eyed Boy”), The Drifting Classroom’s “international high school” is populated by a ragtag team of Annie-esque English-speaking kids of all stripes. During an impromptu jam session of “Here Comes The Bride”(?!), a tornado hurls the entire school into an alternate dimension time-slip — and as the baffled students and faculty (led by ‘50s teen idol Troy Donahue) navigate through a desert wasteland, giant bugs tear through the children like twigs, a gripping madness immediately sets in with the children, and hell breaks loose at every turn! With an impossible Neverending Story-meets-Twilight Zone vibe, the fantastic and the bleak blend together beautifully with this baby; this one is so face-melting your head will be a panini by the time it’s over.
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1987, digital presentation, 104 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for The Drifting Classroom!

House (encore show!)

The most mindboggling Japanese film ever!
house_website
5/9/2013 - 10:15PM

A delirious pop-horror fantasy from one of Japan’s foremost cult filmmakers, House could be the most legendary horror film you’ve never seen. Former experimental filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi twists ghost story expectations inside-out by utilizing a multi-colored candy-coated visual style that pulls equally from TV commercials, soap operas and the avant-garde. The plot, such as it is, follows Oshare (Kimiko Ikegami) and six schoolgirls as they take an ill-advised summer trip to visit her spinster aunt. Obayashi uses the thin story to cram in as many dazzling experimental effects as the human retina can absorb. Humans turn into piles of bananas, pianos devour their players, animated demons spew blood and appendages — House is a gleeful melee that smashes genres together with more force than the Hadron Collider!
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1977, 35mm, 88 min.

Watch the trailer for “House”!
YouTube Preview Image

An Evening With Nobuhiko Obayashi (director in person!)

obayashishorts_website
5/9/2013 - 7:30PM

Prepare to meet one of the most seismically influential Japanese film artists of the last fifty years. We’re talking a bounty of innovative, straight-up masterfully strange work in the widely varied realms of the experimental underground, the 30-second TV ad spot and the pop feature film; Nobuhiko Obayashi is indeed not only the pure genius that birthed House, but also iconic Japanese commercials with the likes of Charles Bronson, and Godard-like 8mm mini-masterpieces. In an extremely rare Stateside appearance, Nobuhiko-san will hang out with us on the Cinefamily stage, telling us tales of the fast-paced Japanese ad industry, what it was like to be one of the founding members of his country’s avant-garde film scene, and the origins of some of his most out-there creations. Plus, we’ll take a look at excerpts from his legendary Sixties film experiments!

Obayashi's "House" Party AFTERPARTY (FREE ADMISSON!)

Come hang at our house!
houseparty_party_website
5/8/2013 - 10:30PM

FREE ADMISSION!!!! Co-sponsored by Angel City Brewery.

If you’re unable to make it out to the first half of the OBAYASHI’S “HOUSE PARTY” evening — we’re gonna be going all the way until 2AM, with:

- nectar of the gods from Angel City Brewery
- DJ sets from HEALTH‘s John Famiglietti
- photo booth by Snap Yourself!
- upstairs blacklight art gallery
- haunted house décor
- crazy visuals from the career of Nobuhiko Obayashi (director of House), and more!

Obayashi's "House" Party (feat. "House", director in person!)

Director in person, WOW!!!!
house_website
5/8/2013 - 8PM

CO-SPONSORED BY ANGEL CITY BREWERY.

Can you believe it?!?! Nobuhiko Obayashi, filmmaker behind House — possibly the single craziest, unpredictable and most inventive Japanese feature film of its era — is gonna join the Cinefamily in a 35mm screening of the film, followed by a Q&A, and a House-themed shindig. A delirious pop-horror fantasy from one of Japan’s foremost cult filmmakers, House could be the most legendary horror film you’ve never seen. Former experimental filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi twists ghost story expectations inside-out by utilizing a multi-colored candy-coated visual style that pulls equally from TV commercials, soap operas and the avant-garde. The plot, such as it is, follows Oshare (Kimiko Ikegami) and six schoolgirls as they take an ill-advised summer trip to visit her spinster aunt. Obayashi uses the thin story to cram in as many dazzling experimental effects as the human retina can absorb. Humans turn into piles of bananas, pianos devour their players, animated demons spew blood and appendages — House is a gleeful melee that smashes genres together with more force than the Hadron Collider!
Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1977, 35mm, 88 min.

Watch the trailer for “House”!
YouTube Preview Image

google sira bulucu google sira bulucu google sira bulucu php script encode php script encoder kanunlar kanunlar tuzukler google sira bulucu google sira bulucu google sira bulucu google sira bulucu seo