La Collectionneuse




Read an article about La Collectionneuse in French Morning!


About La Collectionneuse

“Qui est La Collectionneuse?”
La Collectionneuse — the woman who collects — is the totemic hostess of Cinefamily’s new monthly cinematic salon for lovers of French film and culture. For her monthly soirée, La Collectionneuse opens her private cabinet de curiosités to share pearls of cinéma français –from rare shorts and scopitones to feature film discoveries.–followed by sparkling conversations, artistic installations, and delightful libations, all enjoyed in our own little backyard guinguette! For La Collectionneuse isn’t just collecting her beloved objets d’art to fascinate and entertain you, she’s gathering her favorite people….if you’re lucky, maybe she’ll collect you!

 

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Jules et Jim

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8/14/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

In memory of Jeanne Moreau

The defining film of the French New Wave, endlessly referenced and reimagined, Jules et Jim’s iconic, tragic love triangle – with the Austrian Jules, his French bohemian friend Jim, and the enigmatic Catherine as its points – is a romance that echoes throughout pop culture, zeroing in on that perennial draw: youthful love too perfect to last. Buoyed along by a kind of propulsive jouissance, this third feature from Truffaut (following The 400 Blows and Shoot the Piano Player) pushed boundaries with its every move – with nimble and fluid nouvelle vague-defining camera work, evocative music, and stellar performances (especially from cool girl and award-winner Jeanne Moreau).

Dir François Truffaut, 1962, 35mm, 105 mins.

Moral Tales: Love in the Afternoon

Love in the Afternoon
7/29/2017 - 5PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

With a DJ set by Jim Smith from The Smell

“I dream of a life comprised of first loves and last loves…” muses Bernard Verley’s satiated Parisian lawyer in Rohmer’s final Moral Tale – at once the funniest, most probing, and arguably greatest of the series. Verley assures us, of course, that his wandering eye is purely part of his escapist routine, much like his beloved novels: fancies and fancies alone, that ultimately affirm his fidelity. That is, until his will is tested by après-midi encounters with Chloé, played by the iconic model and socialite Zouzou, whose free-wheeling, laissez-faire lifestyle offers an escape hatch from his comfortable bourgeois existence. Rohmer and his trusted cinematographer Nestor Almendros (Days of Heaven, frequent Truffaut collaborator) working at the height of their powers, marry refined classicism with the post-Nouvelle Vague‘s loose naturalism – a collection of stolen moments and cinematic reveries, like the story itself. After years of investigating the nature of male lust, Rohmer reaches a peace with monogamy in the film’s climax: that though we can’t stop ourselves from wanting what we don’t need, we may be surprised at how much we need what we don’t want.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1972, 35mm, 97 min.

Print courtesy of the Institut Français. Special thanks to the Cultural services of the French Embassy.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Moral Tales: Claire's Knee

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7/22/2017 - 5PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“Something close to a perfect film… Claire’s Knee unfolds like an elegant fairy tale in a series of enchanted and enchanting encounters, on the lake, in gardens heavy with blossoms, in interiors that look like Vermeers… it is so funny and so moving, so immaculately realized, that almost any ordinary attempt to describe it must, I think, in some way diminish it,” wrote The New York Times‘ Vincent Canby in 1971.

Arguably Rohmer’s masterpiece, the fifth installment of his Moral Tales sextuplet, Claire’s Knee, traces the lustful pangs of Jérôme, a diplomat stationed at Lake Annecy in Western France, as he encounters and muses with Aurora, a wizened novelist, and two teenage girls. Unfolding in a novelistic, stream-of-consciousness style across July 1970, Claire’s Knee achieves as close to pure heartbeat-editing as ever attempted in French cinema. The moody photography (Rohmer’s second film in color) is utterly entrancing; the performances deftly subtle; the drama purely human. Canby placed the film within the company of Intolerance, Rear Window, and My Darling Clementine – works that not only attest to the power of the cinematic form, but could only exist because of it.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1970, 35mm, 105 min.

Print courtesy of the Institut Français. Special thanks to the Cultural services of the French Embassy.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Moral Tales: My Night at Maud’s

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7/15/2017 - 5PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

With a DJ set by Jim Smith from The Smell

My Night at Maud’s is one of those movies with truly great dialogue – the kind of late-night heart-to-hearting and waxing philosophical that you recognize more from life than from other movies. Deep-dives that wantonly break the “sex/politics/religion” rule and life-like skirmishes played out awkwardly via unspoken social cues will make you laugh or wince with recognition. Rohmer remains obsessively devoted to wrapping reality up in fiction, casting a Marxist to play a Marxist and intertwining his protagonist’s romantic troubles with the writings of mathematician-philosopher Blaise Pascal. If that sounds pretentious and unromantic, Rohmer knows it – his specialty is in vain male heroes bumbling through tangled webs of self-deception. With the third (but fourth released) Moral Tale, the formula finally won him a breakout success, garnering praise at Cannes and even penetrating mainstream theaters in the U.S., where Rohmer landed his only Oscar nomination. It introduced Rohmer to America as the New Wave’s most understated master – novelistic, quietly satirical, and a keen observer of the subtle beauty and absurdity of human behavior.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1969, 35mm, 110 min.

Print courtesy of the Institut Français. Special thanks to the Cultural services of the French Embassy.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Moral Tales: La Collectionneuse

La Collectionneuse
7/8/2017 - 5PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Witty, philosophical, erotic, and true to life, La Collectionneuse is like a dream-vision of the summer vacation in the south of France you never had. As contradictory, sensual, and sardonic as its languid heroes, the film throws a spotlight on small moments of romantic caprice or boredom, and practically heralds the new, bohemian style of dandyism as it emerged in the ’60s: voluntary unemployment, casual sex, avant-garde philosophy, pop music, and comic books. As he staged these gorgeous Côte d’Azur-set scenes, Rohmer obsessed himself with authenticity: visual artist Daniel Pommereulle plays himself and co-wrote the dialogue with the other two leads, and the filmmaker himself called around for collectors of insect noises to find the right species for Saint-Tropez in June.

Though made third, La Collectionneuse was conceived of as Moral Tale number four; it was made with an exceptionally limited budget while Rohmer waited for Jean-Louis Trintignant to be available for My Night at Maud‘s.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1967, DCP, 89 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Moral Tales: The Bakery Girl of Monceau & Suzanne’s Career at Zebulon

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7/6/2017 - 8PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

This event will take place at Zebulon, located at 2478 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039. Doors open at 7pm, show at 8pm.

After party with DJs Mark Wright and Jessica Hardy from Décadanse Soirée

The Bakery Girl of Monceau

A frustrated romantic of a law student is torn between Sylvie, a spectral art gallery assistant, and Jacqueline, a coarse bakery shopgirl. Rohmer finds ethereal, universal themes of lust within a few square blocks – summoning the power of cinema to render the everyday bustle of Paris a staging ground for an obsessive drama. The first Moral Tale is pure Nouvelle Vague: shot guerilla-style on 16mm in the back alleys of the 8th arrondissement, delectably local, and featuring narration by fellow film titan Bertrand Tavernier.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1963, digital presentation, 23 min.

Suzanne’s Career

Rohmer has a gift for spotlighting idiosyncratic behavior – the unpracticed snowflake-qualities of real people that are usually lost on-screen, beneath layers of dramatic training and self-awareness. In the Moral Tales’ second episode, Rohmer develops his effortless blend of a novelist’s diary-style storytelling with naturalistic, acutely observed, and often contradictory human behavior. The result is raw and funny, tripping loosely around the lives of middle-class college students in a vivid time capsule of Paris’s Latin Quarter in the early ’60s. The young unknowns who fill out Suzanne’s Career really seem like college freshmen; babies in grown-up bodies opting for ill-conceived romances and failing their classes with the charming self-absorption of teenagers.

Dir. Éric Rohmer 1963, digital presentation, 54 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

L'Atalante

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6/30/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Don’t be fooled by the flying cat gags or that scene where Michel Simon does the Dougie — for all its playfulness, Jean Vigo’s 1934 romance L’Atalante is an obsessively precise work, anchored by a deep reverence for the cinematic craft. The only feature of Vigo’s abbreviated career (tuberculosis), L’Atalante dots a modest storyline with scenes of jaw-dropping visual reverie so tonally and rhythmically sophisticated they might pass for the contemporary work of any of the more aesthetically open-handed modern auteurs (think Nicolas Winding Refn, Alfonso Cuarón, Barry Jenkins). As on all his films, Vigo here enlists cinematographer Boris Kaufman, the youngest brother of Soviet documentarian Dziga Vertov, with whom the young Pole shared a delighted fascination with the unique technical potential of film. Despite mannered performances entirely typical of the pre-Method era, Juliette (Dita Parlo) and Jean’s (Jean Dasté) tempestuous honeymoon comes brightly to life on screen, largely thanks to Kaufman’s dynamic camera, which plies the decks of the titular vessel and its lovers’ tangled bodies with startling intimacy.

Dir. Jean Vigo, 1934, 35mm, 89 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Fantastic Planet (Off-site at Zebulon)

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6/4/2017 - 8PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office and Zebulon LA

After-soirée and DJ set by Zebulon DJs!

This event will take place at Zebulon, located at 2478 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039. Doors open at 7pm, show at 8pm.

Join your favorite blue aliens for a screening of 1973 cult French classic, Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans – Oms – are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters – Draags – in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to Topor’s surreal, eerie creature and background designs, and an amazing, psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, digital presentation, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Touche française (Off-site at Zebulon)

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5/3/2017 - 9PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office and Zebulon LA

After-soirée and DJ set by Zebulon DJs!

This event will take place at Zebulon, located at 2478 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039. Doors at 8pm, show at 9.

Our (French) friends are opening up a new space on the East side! Join us for a screening at this beautiful new cafe/bar/music venue, for Touche française, Jean-François Tatin’s series of 12 mini-docs on the impact of French electro!

From pioneer Laurent Garnier to the hybrid influence of Motorbass, from the revolutionary Daft Punk to the free pop spirits of Air and Sebastien Tellier, Touche française revisits the movement through 12 iconic pieces of French electronic music that have entertained the world since 1995.

Dir. Jean-François Tatin, 2016, digital presentation, 84 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Sans Soleil

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4/9/2017 - 7PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“The first image he told me about was of three children on a road in Iceland, in 1965. He said that for him it was the image of happiness and also that he had tried several times to link it to other images, but it never worked. He wrote me: one day I’ll have to put it all alone at the beginning of a film with a long piece of black leader; if they don’t see happiness in the picture, at least they’ll see the black.”

And so begins the legendary epistolary film that is Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil. While dispatches from Japan and Guinea-Bissau – written by a Sandor Krasna (an alter-ego for Marker himself) – are read aloud, this spellbinding travelogue-cum-philosophical inquiry traverses the nature of time, memory, and history. Tender recollections take us from a temple consecrated to cats to the lunar landscapes of Iceland, from the depths of psychedelic video art to the mysteries of Hitchcock’s Vertigo. With irrepressible curiosity and a tinge of melancholy, this is filmmaking that truly quickens the heart – screening on a gorgeous 35mm print.

Dir. Chris Marker, 1983, 35mm, 100 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The King and the Mockingbird

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3/25/2017 - 4PM

Presented in conjunction with Fight the Power and Animation Breakdown!

A delightfully aware and exquisite children’s tale about the dangers of fascism and the power of self-image, The King and the Mockingbird (Le roi et l’oiseau) tells of a vainglorious king’s painting coming to life and deposing of its image-sake. This new king hunts down the also-risen portraits of a young shepherdess he admires and her lover-boy chimney sweep in order to steal her hand. Based on the work of Hans Christian Andersen, this affably subversive animated adventure was scripted by legendary Jacques Prevert (Port of Shadows, Children of Paradise). A wildly inventive treat and apropos fable, the film took decades to see release and was a big inspiration for Studio Ghibli founder Hayao Miyazaki.

Dir. Paul Grimault, 1980, DCP, 83 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Beau Travail (encore!)

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2/28/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

What happens when those who thrive on control find it slipping away? French Foreign Legion sergeant Galoup (Leos Carax regular Denis Lavant) violently fumbles with this quandary in Claire Denis’ masterful fifth feature, set in the Horn of Africa in the peacetime Republic of Djibouti. Like the rusting relics of this country’s militarized past, the chinks in Galoup’s armor begin to show as he struggles to maintain authority over his troops with the quiet desperation of a man newly drained of significance. As the lithe legionnaires run military drills (they are staying in shape for… what, exactly?), their perspiring bodies receive the same reverent lensing as the agile athletes of Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, thanks to Denis’s longtime collaborator, cinematographer Agnès Godard. With simple stretching sessions blocked with geometric, Busby Berkeley-like precision, underwater sequences that flirt with the ghost of Esther Williams, and pulsing nighttime discotheques, Beau Travail looks back at its New Wave predecessors while tipping its beret to neoclassical ballet traditions for a singular piece of elliptical, formally abstracted cinema – with a final scene you might never forget.

Dir. Claire Denis, 1999, 35mm, 92 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Beau Travail (encore!)

Beau Travail 1
2/24/2017 - 10PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

What happens when those who thrive on control find it slipping away? French Foreign Legion sergeant Galoup (Leos Carax regular Denis Lavant) violently fumbles with this quandary in Claire Denis’ masterful fifth feature, set in the Horn of Africa in the peacetime Republic of Djibouti. Like the rusting relics of this country’s militarized past, the chinks in Galoup’s armor begin to show as he struggles to maintain authority over his troops with the quiet desperation of a man newly drained of significance. As the lithe legionnaires run military drills (they are staying in shape for… what, exactly?), their perspiring bodies receive the same reverent lensing as the agile athletes of Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, thanks to Denis’s longtime collaborator, cinematographer Agnès Godard. With simple stretching sessions blocked with geometric, Busby Berkeley-like precision, underwater sequences that flirt with the ghost of Esther Williams, and pulsing nighttime discotheques, Beau Travail looks back at its New Wave predecessors while tipping its beret to neoclassical ballet traditions for a singular piece of elliptical, formally abstracted cinema – with a final scene you might never forget.

Dir. Claire Denis, 1999, 35mm, 92 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Beau Travail

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2/24/2017 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Pre and post reception with DJ set by Zebulon LA

What happens when those who thrive on control find it slipping away? French Foreign Legion sergeant Galoup (Leos Carax regular Denis Lavant) violently fumbles with this quandary in Claire Denis’ masterful fifth feature, set in the Horn of Africa in the peacetime Republic of Djibouti. Like the rusting relics of this country’s militarized past, the chinks in Galoup’s armor begin to show as he struggles to maintain authority over his troops with the quiet desperation of a man newly drained of significance. As the lithe legionnaires run military drills (they are staying in shape for… what, exactly?), their perspiring bodies receive the same reverent lensing as the agile athletes of Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, thanks to Denis’s longtime collaborator, cinematographer Agnès Godard. With simple stretching sessions blocked with geometric, Busby Berkeley-like precision, underwater sequences that flirt with the ghost of Esther Williams, and pulsing nighttime discotheques, Beau Travail looks back at its New Wave predecessors while tipping its beret to neoclassical ballet traditions for a singular piece of elliptical, formally abstracted cinema – with a final scene you might never forget.

Dir. Claire Denis, 1999, 35mm, 92 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Le père Noël est une ordure

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12/15/2016 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Madcap hijinx spiral to distasteful heights, while pratfalls blend seamlessly with domestic abuse, in this frosty carol-cum-eulogy for that piece of garbage, Father Christmas (the title’s literal translation). Two well-meaning but inept volunteers get stuck working the phones at a suicide hotline on Christmas Eve. When their mentally unbalanced callers decide to pay them a visit, their yuletide quest to bring hope to the disenfranchised snowballs into a manic spree of sexual misadventure and holiday-induced violence. The cast is populated by vaunted members of Le Splendide – the French equivalent of Second City – and the film’s untethered, schizophrenic style contrasts their sketch-style profanities with a masterfully rendered, iridescent Parisian night-world. Like the film’s boozed up, gun-toting santa who distributes strip-tease pamphlets to children, Le père Noël est une ordure gleefully reminds us that Christmas is the most wonderful time to kill yourself.

Dir. Jean-Marie Poiré, 1982, digital presentation, 88 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

La Collectionneuse: Le Magnifique (w/ Jacqueline Bisset in person!)

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11/20/2016 - 7PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

With a set by DJ Mark Wright of Decadanse Soiree

What starts out as a colorful, absurdist espionage spoof is transmogrified into an engaging exploration of the creative psyche in this early-70s French “frame story” from frequent Jean-Paul Belmondo collaborator Philippe de Broca. Bob Saint-Clar (Belmondo) is a world-famous, flamboyant super spy going toe-to-toe with an evil super-villain for the hand of the beautiful Tatiana (Jacqueline Bisset). But Bob is really just the main character in a book being written by Francois Merlin (also played by Belmondo), a down-on-his-luck writer who’s populated his outrageous romp with characters almost directly from his real life, including his shy, beautiful neighbor (again, Bisset). Lively espionage action spills into his day-to-day life with a veritable Swiss army knife of metanarrative devices. Belmondo gives a stupendously hilarious performance, utilizing his trademark physical charisma and award-winning smile, in this story-within-a-story about the sublime ecstasies of identification.

Dir. Philippe de Broca, 1973, DCP, 95 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

La Collectionneuse: Going Places

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6/24/2016 - 7:30PM

Few French films in the ’70s caused more of a ruckus than this horny, hilarious smack in the face to the establishment, featuring Gerard Depardieu and the late Patrick Dewaere as a pair of charismatic, animalistic drifters stealing and screwing their way across the French countryside. Adapted from his own novel by Bertrand Blier, this landmark assault on bourgeois materialism provides Blier’s signature off-kilter whimsy at every unexpected turn, as the anarchic attached-at-the-hip duo (the “testicles” of the film’s original French title, Les Valseuses) do the Kerouac-ian shake, aided by three of France’s most amazing actresses of any era: Miou-Miou, Isabelle Huppert and Jeanne Moreau, who caps her role with a scene that still potently shocks forty years on. Just as seismic as the film’s attitude towards middle-class morality is its impossibly cool editing rhythms—throughout, we pop in and out of emotional and physical transitions as tremendous as Lawrence of Arabia’s blowing-out-a-match-becomes-the-sunrise. Silly, sad, vicious, and tender, this is Blier at his finest, best seen on 35mm and with an audience!

Dir. Bertrand Blier, 1974, 35mm, 113 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Pickpocket

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5/20/2016 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Considering all the innocuous films that have been censored for their subversive ideas, it’s amazing that Pickpocket, Bresson’s deeply seductive user manual for the art of petty theft, was never locked up. It deconstructs a soul’s journey away from and back to God, granted, but the film also functions as a genuine tutorial. Training your eyes to hone in automatically on pricey accessories, Bresson instructs the viewer like Penn and Teller, doubling each gesture, showing you the trick first and then revealing his secret. The impressive sleights of hand were performed and advised by “Kassagi,” a Tunisian pickpocket who, cast in the film essentially as himself, went on to become a famous magician. The film’s hero, Michel—looking childlike in suits that don’t quite fit while fancying himself a Nietzschean superthief—alienates himself from his already-scant kin as he sinks deeper into the inherent sexual excitement of theft, toying precariously with the very real police.

Dir. Robert Bresson, 1959, 35mm, 75 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Eric Rohmer's La Collectionneuse

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4/24/2016 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office
Print courtesy of Institut Français and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy

Join La Collectionneuse to celebrate the one year anniversary of her beloved series, with Eric Rohmer’s La Collectionneuse + a party with a set by DJ Pierrot from Décadanse Soirée!

Witty, philosophical, erotic, and true to life, La Collectionneuse is like a dream-vision of the summer vacation in the south of France you never had. As contradictory, sensual, and sardonic as its languid heroes, the fourth installment in Éric Rohmer’s Moral Tales throws a spotlight on small moments of romantic caprice or boredom, and practically heralds the new, bohemian style of dandyism as it emerged in the ’60s: voluntary unemployment, casual sex, avant-garde philosophy, pop music and comic books. As he staged these gorgeous Côte d’Azur-set scenes, Rohmer obsessed himself with authenticity: visual artist Daniel Pommereulle plays himself and co-wrote the dialogue with the other two leads, and the filmmaker himself called around for collectors of insect noises to find the right species for Saint-Tropez in June.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1967, 16mm, 89 min.

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Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

La Collectionneuse: The Mother and the Whore

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2/12/2016 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office
Print courtesy of Institut Français and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy

With Jim Smith from The Smell DJ-ing post-show, plus a photo booth on the patio!

A rambling snapshot of the disillusioned new generation in 1973 Paris, Jean Eustache’s The Mother and the Whore is a jewel of French ’70s cinema. Eustache—whose free-form, expressive realism and fiercely independent spirit has inspired greats from Jim Jarmusch to Claire Denis—has been called an “ethnographer of his own reality,” a dandyish neo-Lumiére whose candid representation of a ménage à trois is as lifelike as it gets, featuring Bernadette Lafont and Jean-Pierre Leaud stretching their New Wave caricatures to flamboyant heights, undercut with stark frankness.

Come watch these stylish children of the countercultural revolution drunkenly trample one-another’s egos, staging their battles of the heart on a mattress without a frame and cheating on each other in the same room in this epic anti-Valentine.

Dir Jean Eustache, 1973, 35mm, 219 min.

Print courtesy of IF_Logo-CMJN

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: 8 Femmes

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1/28/2016 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film & TV Office

Set by DJ Fifi Laroux

Roger Ebert called 8 Femmes “the first Agatha Christie musical” – a murder mystery combined with an old Hollywood musical, staged like a runway show, and starring a band of legendary French actresses clad in haute-retro styles, on a beautiful technicolor-era set. If Fanny Ardant wrestling Catherine Deneuve to the floor in fabulous ’50s couture doesn’t pique your interest for some reason, there’s always the rest of the titular 8, who have dozens of César awards and nominations between them. Their combined reputations are staggering: Deneuve and Ardant regularly starred in works by the likes of Polanski, Truffaut, Bunuel, Antonioni, Demy, Varda and Resnais; Danielle Darrieux has been a legend so long her name is deployed as a pop-culture reference in Inglourious Basterds. This wacky old-school sleuther meets the new millennium with director Francois Ozon’s uncensored black humor, touting gleeful song-and-dance numbers about incest, adultery and murder.

Dir.François Ozon, 2002, 35mm, 111 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Pierrot le Fou (Opening Night Party!)

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1/22/2016 - 7:30PM

Live Set by Marc Wright aka DJ Pierrot from Décadanse Soirée!

“Tendre et cruel… réel et suréel… terrifiant et marrant…” drones the enigmatic Jean-Paul Belmondo, quoting lines from Jacques Prévert in one of Pierrot Le Fou’s many referential gestures. Jean-Luc Godard’s seductive and unwieldy early-career prismatic masterpiece—presented in a dazzling new restoration—is as beguiling a road film as ever.

Belmondo and Anna Karina are a delightfully foolhardy pair, as unpredictable and decadent as their getaway cars and the blue of the Mediterranean sea, as they flee Paris like a crime scene (and perhaps it is) to traipse around the French Riviera, in a narrative that plays alternately as comedy, drama, and sentimental love story, with a touch of an inscrutable energy most precisely articulated by Renata Adler as “gentle lunacy” (NYT). New 4K restoration by Rialto Pictures.

Dir. Jean-Luc Godard, 1965, DCP, 110 min.

Watch the trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: A Christmas Tale

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12/23/2015 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film & TV Office

Nominated for the Palme d’Or, selected on many of 2008′s best-of lists, and perhaps Desplechin’s finest directorial work, Un conte de Noël reinvents the holiday movie as a freewheeling auteurist meditation on the ways in which we love each other in spite of maybe not loving each other that much. Featuring world-class heavy hitters like Catherine Deneuve and Mathieu Amalric delivering empathetic performances, this anti-holiday movie revels in its existential ambivalence, cooly tragic as it nimbly hops between moods and perspectives, with unexpected monologues into camera, poetic editorial flourishes, and sumptuous, nostalgic cinematography. Witty, philosophical, and emotionally volatile, this yuletide portrait of a family of besieged aristocrats and burnt-out prodigies trying to make sense of their lives has absolutely no carols (hip-hop and classical instead), and lots of opportunity for a little merry schadenfreude.

Dir. Arnaud Desplechin, 2008, 35mm, 150 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Nenette and Boni

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12/8/2015 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film & TV Office.
DJ set by Sun Araw!

If American Pie is post-pubescent psych for dummies, then Claire Denis’ wistful, sexy, mysterious ode to the eroticism of pizza dough and “long french sticks” is like the teen food fetishist’s kamasutra. La Collectionneuse’s favorite film she’s screened thus far, this hits that off-kilter/emotionally disturbed/candy-colored mid-nineties sweet spot—think electric blue eyeshadow, cleavage at the pastry counter, and Vincent Gallo in the background ranting about how he’s “had enough of these fucking croissants.” It’s all poetry, though, with dreamy moods taking precedence over explanation as Denis plucks grace notes out of ape-ish Boni’s hyper-sexy/angry boy brain, juxtaposed with wispy Nenette, vagabond sister whose mission to lose her unborn kid awakens some kind of caveman paternity in her pizza-pounding brother. Set inside a beautiful portrait of Marseilles, a messy, smelly port city expressing itself poignantly as Denis telescopes into fantasies of skin, where estranged urban kids preside over alleys and odd jobs, dreaming of domesticity and fondling french rolls. You’ll never look at your coffee machine the same way…

Dir. Claire Denis, 1996, 35mm, 103 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE - Out 1: Noli me Tangere (L.A. Premiere of the New Restoration!) + Pot Luck!

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11/15/2015 - 12PM

Co-Presented by Super Long Movie Club.

Ring the bells and set off the sirens: the restoration of Jacques Rivette’s sprawling French New Wave masterpiece OUT 1 is the cinephile event of the year!

Clocking in at just under 13 hours, seeing Rivette’s sprawling and episodic magnum opus is the “movie equivalent of reading Proust” (Dennis Lim, NYT); consuming such a beautiful and famously gargantuan work is—like travelling to an exotic land or learning how to tango—the stuff of bucket lists and bragging rights. Originally intended for French television, it’s a cat’s cradle of criss-crossing narrative threads and characters set amongst two countercultural theatre troupes in 1960s Paris (with all their utopian aspirations), shot with a French New Wave formal freedom that, along with it’s status as the second-longest narrative feature of all time, makes it one of the truly unique specimens of the filmic ecosystem.

OUT 1 has been virtually impossible to see since its premiere in 1971, so thank the film gods, and Carlotta Films, for this brand new restoration, allowing us the rare opportunity to watch this cinematic milestone on the big screen, or at all for that matter.

Over two days, the Super Long Movie Club will watch, break, discuss, eat, and maybe just learn a little bit about each other, all on the way to finishing one of the greatest films of all time. And we’ll have a potluck, so bring a dish.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1971, 729 min., New DCP Restoration

NOTE: You only need to buy one ticket. It will get you into both days of the film. No refunds allowed after Oct. 31st.

SCHEDULE:

Day 1 (Nov. 14th at 11 am) Doors at 10:00AM!
Episodes 1-2 (199 min. + Short bathroom break between)
Intermission
Episodes 3-4 (215 min. + Short bathroom break between)

Day 2 (Nov. 15th at Noon) Doors at 11:00AM!
Episodes 5-6 (190 min. + Short bathroom break between)
Intermission
Episodes 7-8 (171 min. + Short bathroom break between)

Watch the trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE - Out 1: Noli me Tangere (L.A. Premiere of the New Restoration!) + Pot Luck!

out1_480_309
11/14/2015 - 11AM

Co-Presented by Super Long Movie Club.

Ring the bells and set off the sirens: the restoration of Jacques Rivette’s sprawling French New Wave masterpiece OUT 1 is the cinephile event of the year!

Clocking in at just under 13 hours, seeing Rivette’s sprawling and episodic magnum opus is the “movie equivalent of reading Proust” (Dennis Lim, NYT); consuming such a beautiful and famously gargantuan work is—like travelling to an exotic land or learning how to tango—the stuff of bucket lists and bragging rights. Originally intended for French television, it’s a cat’s cradle of criss-crossing narrative threads and characters set amongst two countercultural theatre troupes in 1960s Paris (with all their utopian aspirations), shot with a French New Wave formal freedom that, along with it’s status as the second-longest narrative feature of all time, makes it one of the truly unique specimens of the filmic ecosystem.

OUT 1 has been virtually impossible to see since its premiere in 1971, so thank the film gods, and Carlotta Films, for this brand new restoration, allowing us the rare opportunity to watch this cinematic milestone on the big screen, or at all for that matter.

Over two days, the Super Long Movie Club will watch, break, discuss, eat, and maybe just learn a little bit about each other, all on the way to finishing one of the greatest films of all time. And we’ll have a potluck, so bring a dish.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1971, 729 min., New DCP Restoration

NOTE: You only need to buy one ticket. It will get you into both days of the film. No refunds allowed after Oct. 31st.

SCHEDULE:

Day 1 (Nov. 14th at 11 am) Doors at 10:00AM!
Episodes 1-2 (199 min. + Short bathroom break between episodes)
Intermission
Episodes 3-4 (215 min. + Short bathroom break between episodes)

Day 2 (Nov. 15th at Noon) Doors at 11:00AM!
Episodes 5-6 (190 min. + Short bathroom break between episodes)
Intermission
Episodes 7-8 (171 min. + Short bathroom break between episodes)

Watch the trailer!

La Collectionneuse: SHEITAN (w/ Actress Roxane Mesquida in person) + After Party w/ DJ Pop Noir!

sheitan_480_309
10/17/2015 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film & TV Office.

Lead actress Roxane Mesquida (Fat Girl, Sex Is Comedy, Kaboom) in person! After party with DJ set by Pop Noir.

Slack-jawed Parisian shoplifters think their sexy new acquaintance is leading them to her family’s remote and decaying rural estate for some reason other than to stalk and mutilate them—arousing the libido just long enough to cut it off with gardening shears—in this freakishly stylish creep-show, equal parts inbred horror and slacker comedy. Vincent Cassel is Satan incarnate, as a Gallic sheepherder with a deeply unsettling Cheshire cat grin, on this depraved spring-break-in-the-provinces. Expect disquieting juxtapositions of steamy foreplay with greasy shots of deli meat, unpleasant cutaways to satanic goats and canine genitalia, and an al Qaeda-themed rap video (seriously), plus plenty of surreal scares, captured by slick and often beautiful cinematography.

Dir. Kim Chapiron, 2006, Digibeta, 94 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Innocence

Innocence_480_309
9/16/2015 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film & TV Office

After party with tunes by MASHA and drinks, treats and photobooth: put on your best schoolgirl/boy or teacher outfit!

* Free French wine tasting, thanks to Loire Valley USA!

* Photo booth by DOSSHAUS!

Solemn children performing rituals in matching white uniforms is usually a good indication you’re not watching a romantic comedy, and trust us, you’re not. Idyllic summer camp vibes gradually decay into unexplained fear, as frolicking little girls train each other to obey unseen authorities and escape is gently forbidden. This highly choreographed, hyper-minimal gothic fever dream sinks through levels of surreality (doe-eyed kids enter the campus in coffins; ballerinas perform for a murmuring audience of shadows; playtime imperceptibly shifts to unmotivated violence) until it comes full circle and appears alarmingly real. Based on the novella by Frank Wedekind, two of whose stage plays became Tony-winner Spring Awakening and German silent classic Pandora’s Box, Innocence won top honors at Stockholm Film Festival for director Lucile Hadžihalilović and cinematographer Benoît Debie, who also collaborated on Gaspar Noé’s Enter the Void. Marion Cotillard’s tragic elegance matches the film’s; she nurtures the children and punishes them in a stately world of propriety, where tranquility and opulence give way to a strange, hidden brutality.

Dir. Lucile Hadzihalilovic, 2004, 35mm, 122 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Casque d'Or

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8/16/2015 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by The French Film & TV Office

6:30 pm Reception // 7:30pm Movie

DJ set by Doug Jones aka Dante Fontana!

Outdoor pre-reception with accordion player Andy Favre, drinks, treats and photobooth: don’t forget to dress up to enjoy our guinguette!

The title means “golden helmet,” referring to a truly fierce hairdo – a crown of platinum locks with icicle bangs, while black jewels hang from her neck like daggers. Marie rocks it like armor against the extra-dapper mobsters who buy her love on the smoky dancefloors of lavish, lascivious belle époque Paris. She’s Simone Signoret, whose movie star chemistry with co-lead Serge Reggiani reaffirms the existence of a deeper celebrity mystery. Serge’s gentle swagger as Manda the ex-con loverboy makes him like an irresistible puppy that sometimes kills other dogs, and Simone wreaks abiding destruction on every man she catches with her strangely sardonic “come hither” stare. French master Jacques Becker undermines all the wistfulness and nostalgia with too-real portrayals of modern people succumbing to their least-desirable instincts, and directs his cast with an unadorned maturity that would win praises from a young François Truffaut and his co-conspirators. The film is really damn pretty, and a crucial French classic. Bring your dates to this one, but forgive them for staring.

Dir. Jacques Becker, 1952, 35mm, 96 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Duelle

Duelle_480_309
7/5/2015 - 6:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office.

“Gueule de bois” (literally “wooden mouth”) or hungover after the 4th of July? Dress up in your classiest French outfit and join us for our pre-reception on the patio at 6:30pm, for cocktails, music, photo booth and mingling…

One of the most criminally overlooked corners of cinema is Jacque Rivette’s half-completed quartet of films, “The Daughters Of Fire.” Conceived in 1976, they were inspired as much by the mystical writings of Gerard de Nerval, the arcane origins of Mardi Gras, and certain Hollywood postwar genre films as by magic and ritual and a quest to invent an entirely new form of mise en scène. La Collectioneuse presents this extremely rare screening of the first and greatest of these, Duelle. Experience the bewitching Goddess of the Sun (radiant Bulle Ogier) and the Goddess of the Moon (luminous Juliet Berto) as they descend to Earth in search of a magical red diamond that will allow them to extend their stay in the mortal realm. With a glorious orchestration of color, costume, and sinuous, sinister camera moves, Duelle is infused with the occult noir spirit of Mark Robson’s The Seventh Victim and the poetic romanticism of Cocteau’s Knights Of The Round Table (the sole male cast-member is one of his dancers), and exists as one of those rare portals, a movie mirror through which the viewer may glide trembling to an endlessly seductive twilight world of invented myth.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1976, 121 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Shorts by Caro & Jeunet + THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN

city-of-lost-children
5/29/2015 - 9:30PM

Co-presented by The French Film & TV Office

This elaborately twisted, 20,000 leagues-under-Paris-style macabre fairy tale was the most expensive movie to come out of France in 1995. It’s wondrously seedy set design won Jean Rabasse a César award and nominations abound for the film’s painterly visuals, with lavish costuming by haute designer Jean-Paul Gaultier and mind-boggling CGI animation. The glittery dystopian story unfolds as a Russian strongman and a ten year old thief seek a map to guide them through a watery minefield and into the sea-bound laboratory of a genetically modified madman who’s been kidnapping the city’s children to steal their dreams. They adventure through a carnival city of nightmares, dogged by electric eyed cultist agents and a cohort of amnesiac clones. It’s pure eye candy, with memorable performances by Ron Perlman and a rogue’s gallery of underworld freaks.

Dir. Marc Caro & Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 1995, 35mm, 112 min.

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: Shorts by Caro & Jeunet + THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN

city-of-lost-children
4/30/2015 - 7:02PM

Description coming soon…
Dir. Marc Caro & Jeanne-Pierre Jeunet, 1995, 35mm, 112 min.

LA COLLECTIONNEUSE: A French Black and White Night (feat. Cocteau's "Blood of a Poet")

blackandwhitenight_website
4/24/2015 - 7:30PM

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office. With delectable delicacies from Crepes Bonaparte!

“Poets…shed not only the red blood of their hearts but the white blood of their souls” — Jean Cocteau

La collectionneuse — the woman who collects — opens her private cabinet de curiosités to share beautiful pearls of the French cinema each month. Here you’ll find selections from the gallery of incontournable masterpieces, as well as sparkling rarities that you may have never heard of, unless you are just back from France! As well, vraiment super DJs will charm your ears, making you swing and sway to Gallic tunes as you enjoy drinks and treats on our decorated back patio. Once there, you’ll also have some beautiful souvenirs, thanks to our themed photobooth and the delightful encounters you’ll make at our guinguette. For the first installment of the series, it’s all about noir et blanc, aka Black and White. Alongside a compilation of quixotic shorts, tonight’s 35mm selection is Blood of a Poet, Jean Cocteau’s legendary collection of seriously cool abstract setpieces from the early 1930s. Don’t forget the dress code; put on black and white, of any kind!

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “A French Black And White Night”!

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