Kris Kristofferson: A Cowboy In Hollywood

 

 

He’s a scholar and a boxer, he’s a pilot and a rocker
He’s a pilgrim and a preacher, and a problem when he’s stoned
He’s a walkin’ contradiction, partly truth and partly fiction,
He’s Cinefamily’s favorite cowboy in Hollywood.

 

In the early-’70s, a new kind of Hollywood connected with a new kind of country music — and no man brought both these worlds together better than Kris Kristofferson. Not only was he helping to take country out of the Grand Ol’ Opry and onto the real dirt roads of our shared Americana, with hits like “Me and Bobby McGee” and “Help Me Make it Through the Night” — but he also made the most successful Hollywood transition out of any cowboy singer from the time, acting in a series of the era’s now-classic films. When directors like Peckinpah, Scorsese and Mazursky sought soulful authenticity, they found it in the warm, world-weary, blue-eyed gaze of this hard-scrabble singer-songwriter.

 

FREE SHOWS (pre-registration required):
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MEMBERS-ONLY: An Evening With Kris Kristofferson (plus Cisco Pike reunion/screening w/ Harry Dean Stanton!) – Friday, Nov. 1st, 7:30pm
SNEAK PREVIEW: The Motel Life (Kris Kristofferson and filmmakers Alan & Gabe Polsky in person!) – Saturday, Nov. 2nd, 7:00pm

 

BUY TICKETS ($12/free for members):
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PAT GARRETT & BILLY THE KIDSaturday, Nov. 2, 9:45pm, Sunday, Nov. 3, 7:30pm
CISCO PIKE (encore screening) – Monday, Nov. 4, 10:45pm
VIGILANTE FORCEThursday, Nov. 7, 10:45pm
BLUME IN LOVESaturday, Nov. 9, 2:00pm
ALICE DOESN’T LIVE HERE ANYMORESaturday, Nov. 16, 4:30pm
CONVOYSaturday, Nov. 23rd, 5:00pm
HEAVEN’S GATE (plus Thanksgiving Leftovers Potluck) – Saturday, Nov. 30th, 1:00pm

 

Watch the trailer for “Kris Kristofferson: A Cowboy In Hollywood”!

 

THANKSGIVING LEFTOVERS POTLUCK: Heaven's Gate

Get creative, bring a dish!
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11/30/2013 - 12:30PM

Dine on the best of the rest of our collective Thanksgiving meal, while we luxuriate in the new DCP restoration of Michael Cimino’s lavish revisionist Western Heaven’s Gate. Take those cranberries, stuffing, taters and last bits o’ bird (plus anything else left over from your holiday feasting) and get creative — bring a dish!

One of the all-time audacious apexes of cinematic ambition, this 1980 follow-up to Oscar-winning filmmaker Michael Cimino’s lauded The Deer Hunter was hugely dismissed upon its first release — and it’s the historical diminishment of Kris Kristofferson’s consummate performance that remains perhaps the most lasting lament from the film’s initial fallout. A significant amount of Heaven’s Gate’s retroactive appeal is due to its leading man’s natural charisma, a beautiful balance between moral zeal and suave romanticism as Kristofferson portrays a U.S. Marshal navigating expansive landscapes of immigrant combat and itinerant passions in 19th century Wyoming, along with an astounding supporting cast of Christopher Walken, Isabelle Hupert, Jeff Bridges, John Hurt, Sam Waterson, Brad Dourif, Joseph Cotten and Mickey Rourke. Come spend a lazy Saturday afternoon with us, catching up with both a neglected classic and what’s arguably the finest performance in Kris’s career of captivating characters.
Dir. Michael Cimino, 1980, DCP, 216 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Heaven’s Gate”!

Convoy

Kristofferson behind the wheel!
convoy_website
11/23/2013 - 5PM

The director and star of Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid, together again for a truly wild ride! To close out the Seventies, Sam Peckinpah took the popular CB radio-themed novelty country song by C.W. McCall, and married it with a freewheeling, Altman-esque take on the plight of the Little Guy vs. The Political Machine, with Kris Kristofferson joined behind the wheel by another former Peckinpah star: The Getaway’s Ali McGraw, returning to the screen after a six-year absence. As it was no secret that Convoy was filmed at a particularly chaotic time in Peckinpah’s later life, the film zig-zags like the Roadrunner leaving Wile E. Coyote in the dust — and the result is a loony, highly fun dogpile of character gags, wide vistas of eighteen-wheeler mayhem, Kristofferson with his shirt off (hubba-hubba!), and McGraw defiantly sporting one of the weirdest hairdos of the era. They really, really don’t make ‘em like this anymore.
Dir. Sam Peckinpah, 1978, 35mm, 110 min.

Watch the trailer for “Convoy”!
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Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore

Kristofferson and Scorsese!
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11/16/2013 - 4:30PM

Made directly in-between the twin titans of Mean Streets and Taxi Driver, Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore shows off Martin Scorsese’s rare female-centric side. After the smashing success of The Exorcist, actress Ellen Burstyn had her pick of any roles and collaborators she wanted. As any smart artist in 1974 would do, she chose rising directorial star Scorsese as her filmmaker — and, as her leading man, Kris Kristofferson, who was at that time quickly becoming a pop icon of sensitive masculinity. As soft spoken divorcee David, Kristofferson exudes quiet warmth and care, two qualities Alice (an amazing Burstyn, who won a Best Actress Oscar for her work here) hasn’t found in a man in years — not even her late husband, whose death sends her on a road trip to find emotional and artistic peace. With an effortless charm, Kristofferson ingratiates David to Alice and audience alike, in a portrayal that would likewise solidify the entertainer’s evolution as an actor with a growing range.
Dir. Martin Scorsese, 1974, 35mm, 112 min.

Watch the trailer for “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore”!
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Blume In Love

Me Decade morality merry-go-round!
blumeinlove_website
11/9/2013 - 3PM

The wonderfully tuned trio of George Segal, Kris Kristofferson and Susan Anspach head one of the most ambitious and emotionally rewarding films from the mind of Paul Mazursky, the Seventies zeitgeist chronicler of Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice and An Unmarried Woman. As the “Me Decade” bestowed a great deal of moral liberties, the average schnook was sometimes unprepared to handle them in stride — and Blume In Love, Mazursky’s tale of a divorce lawyer in the age of sexual freedom coming to terms with the fact that his ex-wife is indeed his true love, is awash with brilliant subtleties, and many true laugh-out-loud moments. As the era was the first in many moons to acknowledge American platonic male friendship with sensitivity, the film’s dynamic between Segal’s wound-up modern lover and Kristofferson’s laid-back dude was groundbreaking then, and still just as fresh today, thanks to Mazursky’s razor-sharp observations.
Dir. Paul Mazursky, 1973, 35mm, 115 min.

Watch the trailer for “Blume In Love”!
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Vigilante Force

Kristofferson the butt-kicker!
vigilanteforce_website
11/7/2013 - 10:45PM

“[It reminds us that] there was a time when action cinema didn’t need a hundred million dollars to grab your attention. All that was required was a lot of action, brutality, gun battles and excessive amounts of things blowing up for no reason at all.” — Cool Ass Cinema

Dirty Harry and Walking Tall collectively spurred a golden wave of Seventies vigilante revenge tales — with one of the most outrageous and whip-crack entertaining of them all being this genre treasure from George Armitage (Miami Blues, Grosse Pointe Blank), starring Kris Kristofferson as a devious smalltown lawmaker/breaker. This over-the-top excursion has more than its fair share of completely awesome stuntmen fodder, with the opening several minutes alone containing enough insanely cartoonish rowdiness for any other film’s total running time. Kristofferson, who normally is called upon to play the charmer in a much more subdued fashion, looks like he’s having a ball as one of the era’s most oblique anti-heroes, in a wicked casting move that recalls Henry Fonda’s turn in Leone’s Once Upon A Time In The West. Co-starring the always wonderful Bernadette Peters, this movie couldn’t get any more funner — or rarer in a theatrical setting, as we present Vigilante Force from an archival print!
Dir. George Armitage, 1976, 16mm, 89 min. (Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive)

Watch the Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Vigilante Force”!
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Cisco Pike

Kristofferson in a post-Summer of Love L.A.!
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11/4/2013 - 10:45PM

A heavenly slice of dark, laid-back storytelling that effortlessly captures the pulse of L.A. in the post-Summer Of Love “what do we do now?” era. In his starring debut film role, a sexily dejected Kristofferson plays the sexily dejected Cisco Pike, a faded rock star and ex-con armed only with a squint, stagger, boots and perfectly tousled locks. His dreams of a better life are dashed when a frighteningly high-strung crooked cop (played brilliantly by Gene Hackman) blackmails Cisco; he must sell a briefcase full of hash in just 48 hours, or go back to jail. This plot device allows for an incredible zoological survey of stoner Los Angeles, as Kris is forced to crawl over every corner of the Thomas Guide, revisiting contacts more interested in his dope connections than his new songs. The film is one long, gloriously casual unveiling of all manner of flaky Venice chicks, rich scenesters, music industry weirdos and scene-stealing counterculture denizens of all kinds — including Tex-Mex musician Doug Sahm, Joy Bang, Antonio “Huggy Bear” Fargas, Warhol superstar Viva, and Harry Dean Stanton in a role so perfect that we wish a spin-off film could’ve been created just for him.
Dir. Bill L. Norton, 1972, 35mm, 95 min.

Watch a clip from “Cisco Pike”!
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Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (11/3)

Frenemies at war, and at play!
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11/3/2013 - 7:30PM

A fierce James Coburn and a sly Kris Kristofferson cut lean, mean, stark, duelling anti-hero figures in Sam Peckinpah’s wholly iconic and highly ambitious 1973 oater — one that, forty years on, has lost none of its emotional power and sheer macho gravity. Even for those allergic to westerns, this deeply moving portrait of two frenemies at war and at play is packed with infectious camaraderie. Kristofferson in particular here exudes a lifetime’s worth of devious charm, even when he’s gunning down the “good guys.” The amazing vibes aren’t limited to our stars alone, for Peckinpah also gives us a gleaming character actor buffet boasting L.Q. Jones, Harry Dean Stanton, Luke Askew, Jack Elam, Slim Pickens — and the off-kilter, but perfect choice of Bob Dylan (who also composed the film’s score) in a near-wordless, enigmatic side role. Crafted from a gem of a script by Rudy Wurlitzer (Two-Lane Blacktop), Peckinpah’s post-Wild Bunch masterpiece was initially butchered by its home studio, shorn of many key scenes and discarded by an unknowing public — but now can be thoroughly appreciated in this restoration cut of Peckinpah’s original vision.
Dir. Sam Peckinpah, 1973, 35mm.

Watch the trailer for “Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid”!
YouTube Preview Image

Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid (11/2)

Frenemies at war, and at play!
patgarrett600
11/2/2013 - 9:45PM

A fierce James Coburn and a sly Kris Kristofferson cut lean, mean, stark, duelling anti-hero figures in Sam Peckinpah’s wholly iconic and highly ambitious 1973 oater — one that, forty years on, has lost none of its emotional power and sheer macho gravity. Even for those allergic to westerns, this deeply moving portrait of two frenemies at war and at play is packed with infectious camaraderie. Kristofferson in particular here exudes a lifetime’s worth of devious charm, even when he’s gunning down the “good guys.” The amazing vibes aren’t limited to our stars alone, for Peckinpah also gives us a gleaming character actor buffet boasting L.Q. Jones, Harry Dean Stanton, Luke Askew, Jack Elam, Slim Pickens — and the off-kilter, but perfect choice of Bob Dylan (who also composed the film’s score) in a near-wordless, enigmatic side role. Crafted from a gem of a script by Rudy Wurlitzer (Two-Lane Blacktop), Peckinpah’s post-Wild Bunch masterpiece was initially butchered by its home studio, shorn of many key scenes and discarded by an unknowing public — but now can be thoroughly appreciated in this restoration cut of Peckinpah’s original vision.
Dir. Sam Peckinpah, 1973, 35mm.

Watch the trailer for “Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid”!
YouTube Preview Image

FREE SNEAK PREVIEW: The Motel Life (Kris Kristofferson & filmmakers in person!)

motellife_website
11/2/2013 - 7PM

Kris Kristofferson and filmmakers Alan & Gabe Polsky will be at the Cinefamily in person for a Q&A after the film! Amongst The Motel Life’s blisteringly cold Nevada winter, and the aching despair of its down-on-their-luck, trapped siblings on the lam, first-time directors Alan & Gabe Polsky deftly shine a light on the enormous power of brotherly bonds, a la “Of Mice And Men”. Stephen Dorff and Emile Hirsch play hard-living, destitute kin with no other surviving family, who must drop their meager existence and flee the law together after Dorff accidentally kills a child pedestrian with his car. Escaping from the pain through a heady stew of flashback memories and storytelling yarns (often animated as pencil-drawn flights of fancy), Hirsch and Dorff navigate a truly endearing familial relationship while jointly struggling through crippling guilt, fear and loss. Also in the mix are Dakota Fanning as a long-lost girlfriend and Kris Kristofferson as a car dealer with sage advice, making The Motel Life a dense buffet of mood and unforgettably gripping characterizations.
Dirs. Alan & Gabe Polsky, 2013, DCP, 85 min.

NOTE: This show is free (first-come, first-serve). To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. All current 1-year “Black Card” Cinefamily members get first entry. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat. Early arrival is highly recommended.

Watch the trailer for “The Motel Life”!
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MEMBERS-ONLY: An Evening With Kris Kristofferson (plus "Cisco Pike" reunion w/ Harry Dean Stanton!)

kriskristofferson_website
11/1/2013 - 7:30PM

Join us for a truly special evening of songs and stories, as we chat live with Kris Kristofferson about the many facets of his music and movie life — from Rhodes Scholar and helicopter pilot, to outlaw country star and Hollywood rebel. And, stick around for a Cisco Pike reunion/screening with the film’s director Bill L. Norton, and co-star Harry Dean Stanton (who played Kristofferson’s songwriting partner in the film), as the two old friends swap lyrics, melodies and fond memories from one of the best cinematic portraits of L.A. on film — a stoner tour of our city’s best ‘70s burn-out locations.
Cisco Pike Dir. Bill L. Norton, 1972, 35mm, 95 min.

In the early 70s, a new kind of Hollywood connected with a new kind of country music — and no man brought both these worlds together better than Kris Kristofferson. Not only was he helping to take country out of the Grand Ol’ Opry and onto the real dirt roads of our shared Americana, with hits like “Me and Bobby McGee” and “Help Me Make it Through the Night” — but he also made the most successful Hollywood transition out of any cowboy singer from the time, acting in a series of the era’s now-classic films. When directors like Peckinpah, Scorsese and Mazursky sought soulful authenticity, they found it in the warm, world-weary, blue-eyed gaze of this hard-scrabble singer-songwriter.

NOTE: Free single admissions to this first-come, first-served show are for current Cinefamily members only +1. To help us track attendance, you must pre-register. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat. Early arrival is highly recommended.

Watch an excerpt from “Cisco Pike”!
YouTube Preview Image