Hangover Matinees: Paris Belongs to Us

 

 

 

BUY TICKETS ($12/free for members. Showtimes subject to change):
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Funny Face – Sunday, August 28th: 1:00pm
Zouzou – Sunday, September 4th: 1:00pm
French Cancan – Sunday, September 11th: 1:00pm
Silk Stockings – Sunday, September 18th: 1:00pm
Under the Roofs of Paris – Sunday, September 25th: 1:00pm
An American in Paris – Wednesday, September 28th: 7:30pm

 

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An American in Paris

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9/28/2016 - 7:30PM

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Whether conducting a rudimentary English lesson for his arrondissements’ local school children or tidying up his microscopic attic apartment, Gene Kelly’s Jerry Mulligan leads a life so effortlessly infused with choreography, even his daydreams are set to song. Culminating in an elaborate, unprecedented, 17-minute dance number (price tag: nearly $5 million dollars in 2016), Vincente Minnelli’s An American in Paris also fashions the appropriate Siene-side stage for the on-screen debut of Leslie Caron (Gigi, Daddy Long Legs), who Kelly discovered in the Ballet des Champs Elysées and brought back stateside specifically for this picture. An immediately recognizable Gershwin songbook paired with the iconic set pieces of a classic Hollywood musical master and perfectly-integrated choreography from Kelly himself (not to mention the loveable sourpuss on Oscar Levant) make this a universally delightful watch, rich with the natural romanticism and swelling emotion of the City of Lights.

Dir. Vincente Minnelli, 1951, 35mm, 113 min.

Under the Roofs of Paris

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9/25/2016 - 1PM

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Under the Roofs of Paris begins with an engrossing establishing shot that drifts downward from the Parisian rooftops. A street singer transforms the cobbled streets into a church-like gathering place, inviting early morning passersby to congregate and join in the choruses in a warm display of local solidarity. Initially skeptical of the then-new sound-sync technology, Rene Clair’s first foray into sound film is an accomplished experiment, a sympathetic look at a working class love triangle that mixes subtle silent-film pantomime with sparse dialogue and engaging song. His dreamily fluid camerawork effortlessly situates the small-scale melodrama within the titular metropolis, making it emblematic without sacrificing its sense of intimacy.

Dir. René Clair, 1930, 35mm (Print Courtesy of the Institut Francais), 96 min.

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Silk Stockings

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9/18/2016 - 1PM

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Co-presented by warnerarchive_300_90

Cyd Charisse and Fred Astaire dance their final number before a Parisian backdrop in this delightfully silly sendup of golden-age Hollywood excess. Charisse’s stoic Soviet operative, Ninotchka Yoschenko, prefers the fireglow of the iron foundries behind Paris’ major public works over its romantic boulevards, until Astaire’s enterprising American producer sweeps her away to the tunes of Cole Porter. A swingin’ swansong made by major studio players before Old Hollywood came crashing down, Silk Stockings finds Astaire and Charisse in their final Freed Unit production, coincidentally the final completed film by musical pioneer Rouben Mamoulian, and also features a late-career comic turn from Peter Lorre as one-third of a trio of bumbling Soviet commissars seduced by the City of Lights.

Dir. Rouben Mamoulian, 1957, 35mm, 117 min.

Renoir's French Cancan

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9/11/2016 - 1PM

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Marking Renoir’s return to Paris after 15 years of making films in the US, French Cancan showcases a spirited, youthful filmmaker eager to put his years in Hollywood to work. Henri Danglard, played with predictable elegance by Jean Gabin, is starting a theatre company called the Moulin Rouge to reinvigorate the Cancan. He gathers the greatest dancers around, including the stunning Françoise Arnoul as the rags-to-riches star of the show, alongside legendary French singers Patachou and Edith Piaf in delightful cameos. Drilling in on the inner-workings, melodrama, romantic entanglements and production of the Moulin Rouge, Cancan culminates in a lavish Technicolor dance number that brings Renoir’s influences (in particular Degas and his own father) to vivid life, in a joyous celebration of vulgarity, dance, and music!

Dir. Jean Renoir, 1954, 16mm, 102 min.

Zouzou

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9/4/2016 - 1PM

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Seeped in romance, unrequited love, and situational siblinghood, Marc Allégret’s Zouzou is a visual feast, showcasing scene after scene of delights, dance numbers—including a shadow play sequence that will leave you squealing with glee—and a peak behind the curtain of Parisian music halls in the 30s. Josephine Baker (in the first starring role for an African American woman) is irresistible at every turn, oozing charisma as she pines for her orphaned “brother”–played with perfection by Jean Gabin (Touchez pas au Grisbi, The Grand Illusion)—whose love interests lie elsewhere.

Dir. Marc Allégret, 1934, 35mm, 92 min.

Funny Face

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8/28/2016 - 1PM

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

With music by George & Ira Gershwin and dresses by Givenchy, Funny Face is an exuberant jaunt through a comically extreme New York fashion world to the streets of Paris, replete with song, dance, and Fred Astaire. This one will hit you over the head with its flights of fancy and cutesy choreography, but the theatrically bookish Audrey Hepburn cuts right through the peacocky comedy with her charm, in the face of a dictatorial magazine editor played by Kay Thompson (said to be based on Vogue editor Diana Vreeland and Harper’s Bazaar editor Carmel Snow). But beyond Astaire and Hepburn’s starpower in their roles as photographer and muse, the film’s real success lies in Richard Avedon’s credit as “visual consultant.” Astaire’s character is said to be based on Avedon himself, appearing alongside Avedon favorite Dovima (as the whiny model Marion), while the film pops with the high contrast, high energy for which the iconic photographer was known.

Dir. Stanley Donen, 1957, DCP, 103 min.

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