How to Survive a Plague (with ACT UP member Maria Maggenti in person!)

how to survive a plague
4/29 - 6PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by Courtney Stephens of Veggie Cloud

In the dark days of 1987, the country was six years into the AIDS epidemic, a crisis that was still being largely ignored by government officials and health organizations — until the emergence of the activist group ACT UP. Largely made up of HIV-positive participants who refused to die without a fight, they took on the challenges public officials had ignored, raising awareness of the disease through a series of dramatic protests. More remarkably, they became recognized experts in virology, biology, and pharmaceutical chemistry. Their efforts would see them seize the reins of federal policy from the FDA and NIH, force the AIDS conversation into the 1992 presidential election, and lead the way to the discovery of effective AIDS drugs that saved countless lives.

First-time director and award-winning journalist David France, who has been covering the AIDS crisis for 30 years, culls from a huge amount of archival footage — most of it shot by the protestors themselves. Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary, How to Survive a Plague captures both the joy and terror of those days, and the epic day-by-day battles that finally made AIDS survival possible.

The film will be followed by a Q&A with longtime ACT UP member Maria Maggenti, who began attending meetings two weeks after the group’s inception when she was a student at NYU. Maggenti is also a filmmaker, whose films as writer/director are The Incredibly True Adventure of Two Girls in Love, Puccini for Beginners and most recently, as screenwriter, Ry Russo Young’s Before I Fall.

This presentation of the film is part of bi-coastal effort to help fund Housing Works’ National Advocacy Trainings, which teach citizens to raise their voices at town hall meetings and with elected officials, to fight back against right-wing attacks on our health care. Please consider supporting their excellent work here.

Dir. David France, 2012, DCP, 110 min.

Watch the trailer!

Animal Farm (off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

animal farm
4/29 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This show will take place at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater, located at 1345 W. 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90026.

Presented by Animation Breakdown

The film will be preceded by a puppet show!

This adaptation of George Orwell’s classic Communist fable was Britain’s first ever wide-release animated film. Following the death of the Lenin-esque Old Major, a power struggle ensues between pig, horse, donkey, and man. Yet the story of the film’s making is as engrossing as the narrative itself. In 1974 Howard Hunt – the ex-intelligence hatchet man then-imprisoned for his role in Watergate – revealed that the CIA’s Office of Policy Co-Ordination had bankrolled Animal Farm, in a series of anti-Soviet counterintelligence operations engaged alongside Britain’s Information Research Department. So, in the midst of conducting psychedelic mind control experiments and overthrowing socialist Latin American governments, American intelligence was developing propaganda out of one of the world’s foremost anti-propagandist writers. Adding to the curiosity, Animal Farm remained largely underseen in the United States – though it was quite popular in West German elementary schools.

Dir. John Halas and Joy Batchelor, 1954, digital presentation, 69 min.

Though all are welcome, please note that this film features mature themes and may not be appropriate for young children.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Super Tight 2 Year Anniversary

butter
4/29 - 10PM
$18/free for members

Rolling admission

Imagine a magical party playground where all the strange, funny, and beautiful elements of art, comedy, magic, and music come to mingle… SUPER TIGHT – a show that gathers the perfect amount of each of these elements into a frosty martini shaker, adds some magic mushrooms, and shakes until sun up – is 2 years old!

Featuring:
Tim Heidecker
Wild Horses
Kate Berlant
Ariel Pink
DJ set by Devendra Banhart
& more TBA!

All proceeds from this show to benefit the ACLU

I Love Dick: The Complete Series (with Jill Soloway, Kathryn Hahn & Chris Kraus in person)

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4/30 - 12PM
Free w/ RSVP

Presented by Women of Cinefamily

Join us for a marathon viewing of the new Amazon original series, I Love Dick. Libations and tacos will be served on the patio, Valet available.

EVERY LETTER IS A LOVE LETTER is the potent title of Part 2 of Chris Kraus’ cult 1997 work of autobiographical fiction, I Love Dick. The Chris of the novel addresses her object, Dick – and her readers – with a stream of confessional, raw, effortlessly consumable letters. And now another letter: Jill Soloway (creator of the acclaimed Transparent) and playwright Sarah Gubbins have created an Amazon original series based on Kraus’ book. With Kathryn Hahn as Chris, Griffin Dunne as her bookish husband Sylvère, and Kevin Bacon as the enigmatic Dick, I Love Dick is true to the original in spirit but is relocated to the remote and singular art town of Marfa, Texas. Soloway and Gubbins’ all-female writers room probe Kraus’ original hot-tipped letters – and their rough and exact reflection of what it is to be both a woman and a woman-artist – with smart reference to work by a cadre of feminist and experimental filmmakers including Chantal Akerman, Carolee Schneemann, Naomi Uman and more.

2016, DCP, 205 mins.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Seeing Sound: Mary Ellen Bute Retrospective

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4/30 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Presented in association with Center for Visual Music

“A pioneer of visual music and electronic art, Mary Ellen Bute produced over a dozen short abstract animations between the 1930s to the 1950s. Set to classical music by the likes of Bach, Saint-Saens or Shostakovich, and filled with colorful forms, elegant design and sprightly, dance-like-rhythms, Bute’s filmmaking is at once formally rigorous and energetically high-spirited, like a marriage of high modernism and Merrie Melodies.” –Ed Halter

“We submerged tiny mirrors in tubes of oil, connected [them] to an oscillator, and drew where these points of light were flying. The effect was thrilling for us—it was so pure. But it wasn’t enough. Finally we got a Bolex camera and started… to make my first film, Rhythm in Light.” –Mary Ellen Bute

Bute made a series of Visual Music films which she called “Seeing Sound.” This program features her short abstract films, including some rarely-seen films on 16mm!

Program runs approximately 70 min.

Prints courtesy Cecile Starr Collection at Center for Visual Music. Image courtesy Center for Visual Music.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life
4/30 - 10PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

1000
5/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Short Films of David Lynch

thegrandmother
5/1 - 10PM
$12/free for members

A program of David Lynch’s earliest, rarest, lowest budget work, including:

Six Men Getting Sick, 1967, 4 min
The Alphabet, 1968, 4 min
The Grandmother, 1970, 34 min
The Amputee (V. 1), 1974, 5 min
The Amputee (V. 2), 1974, 4 min
Premonitions for Following an Evil Deed, 1995, 1 min

Dir. David Lynch, DCP.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Doug Benson Movie Interruption: La La Land

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5/2 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

With a set by DJ Miles Monroe

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and friends (who in the past have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the couches, mics in hand, and say whatever pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen. This month’s pick is La La Land!

Dir. Damien Chazelle, 2016, DCP, 128 min.

The Short Films of David Lynch

sixmengettingsick
5/3 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

A program of David Lynch’s earliest, rarest, lowest budget work, including:

Six Men Getting Sick, 1967, 4 min
The Alphabet, 1968, 4 min
The Grandmother, 1970, 34 min
The Amputee (V. 1), 1974, 5 min
The Amputee (V. 2), 1974, 4 min
Premonitions for Following an Evil Deed, 1995, 1 min

Dir. David Lynch, DCP.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Touche française (Off-site at Zebulon)

c-agnexxs-dahan
5/3 - 9PM
Free w/ RSVP

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office and Zebulon LA

After-soirée and DJ set by Zebulon DJs!

This event will take place at Zebulon, located at 2478 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039. Doors at 8pm, show at 9.

Our (french) friends are opening up a new space on the East side! Join us for a screening at this beautiful new cafe/bar/music venue, for Touche français, Jean-François Tatin’s series of 12 mini-docs on the impact of French electro!

From pioneer Laurent Garnier to the hybrid influence of Motorbass, from the revolutionary Daft Punk to the free pop spirits of Air and Sebastien Tellier, Touche française revisits the movement through 12 iconic pieces of French electronic music that have entertained the world since 1995.

Dir. Jean-François Tatin, 2016, digital presentation, 84 min.

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life 01
5/3 - 9:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life
5/4 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Short Films of David Lynch

the alphabet
5/4 - 10PM
$12/free for members

A program of David Lynch’s earliest, rarest, lowest budget work, including:

Six Men Getting Sick, 1967, 4 min
The Alphabet, 1968, 4 min
The Grandmother, 1970, 34 min
The Amputee (V. 1), 1974, 5 min
The Amputee (V. 2), 1974, 4 min
Premonitions for Following an Evil Deed, 1995, 1 min

Dir. David Lynch, DCP.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Short Films curated for I Love Dick (with filmmaker Naomi Uman and curator Logan Kibens in person!)

shorts program
5/5 - 7:30PM
$14/free for Cinefamily members/$10 for Los Angeles Filmforum members

Co-presented by Los Angeles Filmforum

Join us for a program of short films by Naomi Uman, Carolee Schneeman, Cauleen Smith & more TBA – with curator and I Love Dick consulting producer Logan Kibens and filmmaker Naomi Uman in person.

Program includes:
Leche, dir. Naomi Uman, 1999, 16mm, 30 min.
Removed, dir. Naomi Uman, 1999, 16mm, 6 min.
Fuses, dir. Carolee Schneemann, 1967, 16mm, 22 min.
Chronicles of a Lying Spirit (by Kelly Gabron), dir. Cauleen Smith, 1992, 16mm, 6 min.
Head, dir. Cheryl Donegan, 1993, digital presentation, 3 min.
more TBA!

Another Evil (w/ director Carson Mell & cast in person!)

another evil
5/5 - 10:30PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by Friday Night Frights

Director Carson Mell and cast members Steve Zissis, Mark Proksch, and Dax Flame in person! Film will be followed by a Q&A moderated by Zach Woods.

Let’s take everything we know about the haunted vacation house story (hip couple retreats toward luxe isolation, eschewing high-demand jobs for pine-soaked serenity and the presence of lingering dead, yada yada), and throw it out the damn(ed) window. There’s nothing that could prepare us for first-time feature writer/director Carson D. Mell’s what-the-fuckomedy Another Evil, as architectural photography and literary wit wear away to reveal a taut and disturbing nexus of fear; and when Dan (Steve Zissis) and his arty nuclear family employ a decorated “ghost assassin” to purify their mountain hideaway from pesky spooks, Dan soon finds he may be beholden to more than just what goes bump in the night.

Dir. Carson D. Mell, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Music

three little bops
5/6 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

From theme songs to musical ‘toons, the silly symphonies and merry melodies of the cartoon world are as essential as Acme anvils. Cartoons are fueled and driven by music; composers like Carl Stalling and Raymond Scott brought animation to life. And cartoons feature EVERY kind of music – from classical and opera to jazz and rap. This month we invite you to sing along with us!

Complimentary cereal bar. Pajamas encouraged.

Orlando

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5/6 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“My task with the adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s book for the screen was to find a way of remaining true to the spirit of the book and to Woolf’s intentions, whilst being ruthless with changing the book in any way necessary to make it work cinematically. It would have been a disservice to Woolf to remain slavish to the letter of the book, for just as she was always a writer who engaged with writing and the form of the novel, similarly the film needed to engage with the energy of cinema. And although the book was already a distillation of 400 years of English history (albeit an imagined view of that history, told with a liberal amount of poetic license), the film needed to distill even further.” – Sally Potter

Dir. Sally Potter, 1992, 35mm, 94 min.

Privilege

privilege
5/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“A rock concert is in fact a rite involving the evocation and transmutation of energy. Rock stars may be compared to priests.” – William Burroughs

The first narrative feature from documentary director Peter Watkins (The War Game, Punishment Park), Privilege is a verité-style projection of the near-future 1970s, greatly influenced by direct cinema classic Lonely Boy. Starring Manfred Mann’s Paul Jones, the film projects a future where corporate commercialism, pop music, organized religion, and state-controlled nationalism come together to manipulate the minds of teeny-boppers. Featuring surreal TV commercials, a Franciscan Monk garage band, and a rock concert/political rally packed with kids chanting “we will conform,” Privilege is a surreal, chilling meeting of Triumph of the Will and Top of the Pops.

Dir. Peter Watkins, 1967, 35mm, 103 min.

Je tu il elle

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5/7 - 6PM
$12/free for members

Following Akerman’s wildly formative New York years (where she was drawn to Anthology Film Archives and the films of Michael Snow, Yvonne Rainer, and Jonas Mekas) she returned to Belgium and crafted two of her greatest works: Jeanne Dielman & Je tu il elle. Freed from the confines of narrative filmmaking, Je tu il elle sees Akerman beginning to explore the themes that would come to fruition in Jeanne Dielman. Julie (played by Akerman)’s intimate routine is broken by two sexual encounters, each shot with keen attunement to the viewer’s inherent voyeurism; “like her earlier movies, it was about estrangement, only this time depicted not through the absence of the physical and the sexual, faces and bodies, but through an emphasis on them” (Michael Koresky).

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 1974, DCP, 86 min.

Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles

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5/8 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

When Chantal Akerman presented Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles at the Cannes Film Festival in 1975, she was only 25 (she was 24 when she directed it). The film, which chronicles a few days in the life of Dielman: a single mother and widow, played by Delphine Seyrig, is now understood to be a behemoth in the history of feminist filmmaking. Brilliantly adopting the meditative long-takes of structuralist cinema found in the experimental, non-narrative works of directors such as Michael Snow, Akerman uses these techniques to examine the alienation of our housewife protagonist. In stunning wide shots and real time, we observe the repetitive choreographies of Jeanne’s life: peeling potatoes, sponging her body, turning tricks in the afternoon. But all that remains unvoiced cannot be outrun, and her perfectly executed daily routines start to falter. The timing falls off. A coil starts to glow.

Deliberate and frugal, but also symphonic, Jeanne Dielman was made by a young woman but with all the gravity of an examined life, and raised many of the questions that remain prescient about the female voice, concealed labor, and the nature of care.

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 1975, DCP, 201 min.

Beatriz at Dinner (Free sneak peek with director Miguel Arteta & cast in person!)

Beatriz at Dinner
5/10 - 7:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

Presented by Friends of Cinefamily

Director (and Cinefamily member!) Miguel Arteta join us for a free sneak peek of his new film, Beatriz at Dinner, with cast members Amy Landecker, John Early, Jay Duplass, and David Warshofsky in person!

“How does a person committed to healing — to being principled, empathetic, and good — handle first contact with the devils who think nothing of destroying our world?”
- Bilge Ebiri, Village Voice

A “comedy” of manners for our times, the tightly constructed and expertly penned (by Mike White) Beatriz at Dinner is a reminder that above all else, the wealthiest and most privileged among us take for granted their purchased privacy. Beatriz (Selma Hayek) is a Mexican-American woman who works as a massage therapist and healer. When circumstances lead to her being invited/trapped for dinner at the Californian McMansion of a client, she accepts with apology and gratitude. Throw in a Trumpy CEO and some culturally-normalized corporate evil, and we’re off – ricocheting between comedy and drama, in the grand tradition of the “we’re-all-trapped-under-this-roof” film tradition, that is.

Dir. Miguel Arteta, 2017, DCP, 83 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Dr. Strangelove: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

dr. strangelove
5/11 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“The Bomb overshadowed global politics. It was a kind of ultimate hole card in a game where the stakes were life on earth. Then Kubrick’s film opened with the force of a bucketful of cold water, right in the face.” – Roger Ebert,

Dr. Strangelove arrived three years after Joseph Heller’s Catch-22: two works that cleaved a bold path of satire and savagery through the Cold War thicket of the early 1960′s. From the “you can’t fight in the War Room” War Room to the not-at-all-subtle phallic cigar chomping military officers, Strangelove skewers with pure wit until arriving at the only logical conclusion: nuclear annihilation (though, in the context of the movie, even that is pretty funny). With one of cinema’s all-time greats in the director’s chair, and a lineup that included Peter Sellers, Sterling Hayden, Terry Southern, and Slim Pickens, Strangelove is one of those rare moments in movie-culture when, to put it bluntly, the stars aligned.

Dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1964, DCP, 94min

The Spook Who Sat by the Door

spook who sat by the door
5/11 - 10PM
$12/free for members

“You really wanna mess with Whitey? I can show you how.”

Actor-turned-director Ivan Dixon’s Spook harnesses racial frustrations into a biting heist-thriller — couched in the newly-fashionable cinematic language of Blaxploitation. In a politically-motivated attempt at “integration” (what can be read as not-so-subtle “tokenism”), Spook’s subjugator Dan Freeman is one of several dozen African American recruits hauled in by the hyper-white brass at the CIA for instruction in espionage. Newly armed with training in explosives, ballistics, conversion tactics, and jujitsu, Freeman transposes his knowledge to an eager community of Black Freedom Fighters on Chicago’s South Side — to the chagrin of his former employer.

It can be assumed that, in real life as in the film, the U.S. government does not appreciate being made for a fool, which is why the FBI evoked COINTELPRO strategy and systematically seized and destroyed every print they could find… except one. In an incredible stroke of foresight and artistic rebellion, Dixon archived the original negative under an alternate title, the only reason we’re able to experience Spook today.

Dir. Ivan Dixon, 1973, 35mm, 102 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Born in Flames (w/ Lizzie Borden in person!)

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5/12 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Presented by Women of Cinefamily

Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with restoration funding by The Hollywood Foreign Press Association and The Film Foundation.

On the tail end of one revolution and the eve of the next, two feminist pirate radio stations (“Radio Ragazza” and “Phoenix Radio”) broadcast commentary on the failing socialist state from a future utopian/dystopian New York, where the dream of the left’s takeover has come and gone. Lizzie Borden’s stellar and ferociously beloved documentary-style sci-fi social drama, restored by Anthology Film Archives, envisions an imagined future that upon contemporary viewing looks almost—but not quite—like the past, eerily affecting even beyond its time-capsule appeal. Circling around issues of race, gender, and class that apparently never get old, Born In Flames is revolutionary beyond its political narrative. Shot on a shoestring over a period of five years, using non-actors and little in the way of an advance script, it feels like a feat, carried to completion by the sheer force of ideas and passion.

Dir. Lizzie Borden, 1983, 35mm, 80 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III

leatherface
5/12 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Blumhouse

After Tobe Hooper steered the Chainsaw franchise into gonzo comedy with number two, director Jeff Burr brought back the backwoods terror with Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III. In 1990 the slasher boom of the 80s was in its death throes and aside from a clever and memorable Excalibur spoof trailer this film was largely overlooked – which is a shame because it’s a fast, fun, and twisted entry. A couple on the rocks run afoul of our now extended chainsaw clan – which features a deliciously oily pre-fame Viggo Mortensen, slimy support from Tom Everett, and a heroic turn by horror superstar Ken Foree. Plus, the chainsaw itself gets an upgrade – and boy is it a doozy. A gruesome good time and a must-revisit for the whole skin mask wearing, people eating, chainsaw wielding family.

Dir. Jeff Burr, 1990, 35mm, 85 min.

Tokyo Chorus

tokyo chorus
5/13 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Featuring live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick

“Exquisite and economical, Ozu’s film alternates between brilliantly mounted comic sequences and heartrending working-class realities.” (Janus)

A family story rife with both comedy and misfortune, Ozu’s Tokyo Chorus was the young and already prolific director’s 22nd film. As a father of three struggles during a period of economic depression, Ozu finds comedic reprieve amongst the anxiety.

Dir. Yasujiro Ozu, 1931, 35mm, 90 min.

Here Come the Videofreex (with director Jon Nealon & Videofreex member Skip Blumberg in person!)

-Do It In the Road
5/13 - 6PM
$14/free for members

When Sony introduced the Portapak camera in 1967, suddenly, mobile, amateur video recording was possible. Early adopters Parry Teasdale and David Cort met via the magnetism of their gear at Woodstock and eventually the “Videofreex” collective was born. Part journalistic team – the group briefly worked for CBS – part interventionist-documentarians, these artists/activists captured the marches and political movements of the time, outside of the narrow world of network TV. Filmmakers Jon Nealon and Jenny Raskin’s portrait of the group – featuring ample archival footage and interviews – zeroes in on a pre-iPhone media moment that for some, is now almost inconceivable. Join us in celebrating this pioneering guerilla TV with filmmaker Jon Nealon and Videofreex members Skip Blumberg in person.

Dirs. Jon Nealon & Jenny Raskin, 2015, DCP, 79 min.

Watch the trailer!

Mondo Public Access

tapesandtapesfrankpacholski
5/13 - 9PM
$12/free for members

The people have spoken — and what they’re saying is weird! Once upon a time, before YouTube, remote control renegades itching to scratch the underbelly of the idiot box needed to look no further than their local listings for those two hallowed words — “public access” — to know that their cable bill dollars were hard at work. Join us for one of our signature Cinefamily mondo mixes, featuring the titans of the community-based tube: expect potty-mouthed psychics, lip-synching divas, confessional call-in chaos, psychedelic pranksters, greenscreen fallout, and, of course, clinically insane people with their pets — all getting down and doing their thing in our living room. Scrambling cable boxes and brains alike, these extraordinary ordinary people made legendary non-commercial television in the untamed wilderness of the airwaves. Who said the FCC never did you any favors?

Durga Chew-Bose presents Everyone Else

everyone else
5/16 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Durga Chew-Bose, author of the new book Too Much and Not the Mood, presents Everyone Else, followed by a book signing. Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

Fans of last year’s Toni Erdmann – the three hour-long, German comedy none of us could stop raving about – won’t want to miss director Maren Ade’s earlier work, like the 2009 Everyone Else. Young couple Gitti and Chris are vacationing at Chris’ parents’ villa in Sardinia. Ade’s almost too perceptive window into the relationship spares us none of the details, as the bathing-suit clad couple’s “vacation” – with its ample, visual reminders of Rohmer’s La Collectionneuse – becomes its own bit of prison.

Durga, whose perceptive, personal book of essays swirls in and around the language and world of film, says: “It’s a film that doesn’t mind sitting with the discomfort of a couple’s unrest; those near-imperceptible, sometimes totally physical tensions that build up, that reach some emotional brink, that are, in their way, pure suspense.”

Dir. Maren Ade, 2009, 35mm, 119 min.

Special thanks to Fiona Duncan

The Salesman

thesalesman
5/19 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Presented in conjunction with The Seventh Art Stand

When it was announced that The Salesman won Best Foreign Language Oscar back in February 2017, it was not helmer Asghar Farhadi who accepted the statue but a female member of the Iranian-American community, who clarified the filmmaker’s boycott of the ceremony as a protest of Trump’s travel ban. “I believe,” Farhadi said in a statement, “that the similarities among the human beings on this earth and its various lands… far outweigh their differences.” Expect nothing short of this same empathy echoing throughout this subtle yet engrossing observation of suffering by way of a whodunit, set in present day Iran. Fans of the construct of All About My Mother will enjoy a similar peek into the back – and on-stage lives of actors as a Tehran-based troupe rehearses and stages Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman – albeit divergent from Almodovar’s in its rooted neorealism, and naturally closer in tone to Farhadi’s previous A Separation (2012). This play-within-a-film offers parallel themes of humiliation (you’ll recognize our Willy Loman as soon as you meet him) and family trauma as the walls literally crumble around seemingly sound relationships.

Dir. Asghar Farhadi, 2016, DCP, 125 min.

THE SEVENTH ART STAND is a nationwide screening and discussion series presented by 50+ theaters, museums, and community centers in 25 states, as an act of cinematic solidarity against Islamophobia.

The Silence of the Lambs

silence of the lambs
5/19 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Jonathan Demme left behind a legacy of great films, including arguable crowning jewel, The Silence of the Lambs. Winning Oscars in the top 5 categories, including best director and best picture – an unheard of feat for a “horror” film – its central performances by Jodie Foster (as FBI profiler Clarice Starling) and Anthony Hopkins (as the now iconic Hannibal Lecter) put both actors squarely on the A-list. An adaptation of the second novel in Thomas Harris’ best-selling series, Lambs finds big moments in quiet scenes, allowing Foster and Hopkins to play off each other unforgettably, wringing high-wire tension and rich emotion from something as simple as a probing conversation. It’s a watershed film, one that set the bar for police procedurals and spawned a new sub-genre of serial killer movies – a trend that exploded in the 90s and kickstarted many a great director’s career. With Demme’s sudden passing it’s only right to honor his monumental talent by screening his most celebrated masterpiece, and to hear the screaming of the lambs once again.

Dir. Jonathan Demme, 1991, DCP, 118 min.

Saturday Morning Cartoons: America

schoolhouserock
5/20 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

Part of Fight the Power

Join us for a patriotic plethora of animated Americana!

Since their earliest days, cartoons have been involved in both promoting “American values” and playful rebellions against them. This month’s bonus Saturday Morning Cartoons show celebrates how red, white & blue ‘toons have both embraced and challenged American politics – featuring everything from war time Bugs Bunny and Donald Duck, to Schoolhouse Rock civics lessons.

Join us for the truly American combination of cartoons & all-you-can-eat cereal. Pajamas encouraged.

Omar (with actor Waleed Zuaiter in person!)

omar
5/20 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Presented in conjunction with The Seventh Art Stand

Equal parts Shakespearean tragedy, romantic drama, and 70s paranoid thriller (think the darkest moments in Absence of Malice meet The Conversation with an undercurrent of Romeo and Juliet), this first-ever Palestinian nominee for the Best Foreign Language Oscar situates a universal story of love and struggle within the war-torn labyrinth of Israeli-occupied territory for a masterful exploration of trust – and, when that trust shatters, what drives us to seek revenge. The 440-mile long Israeli West Bank barrier stands as a physical metaphor for conflict in Abu-Assad’s undisputed masterpiece, beginning with the titular Omar defiantly unfettered as he scales the 26-foot tall obstacle fueled by the jetpack of his young, requited adoration for high school student Nadia – and concluding with the political, regional, and religious weight of a region and a new generation reminded of their place within a world much larger than themselves.

Dir. Hany Abu-Assad, 2013, DCP, 96 min.

THE SEVENTH ART STAND is a nationwide screening and discussion series presented by 50+ theaters, museums, and community centers in 25 states, as an act of cinematic solidarity against Islamophobia.

Messiah of Evil

messiahevil6big
5/25 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Print courtesy of the Academy Film Archive

Messiah of Evil was my view of the San Fernando Valley… That bleak high street? If you walk through the San Fernando Valley at night, that’s what you saw.” – Willard Hyuck

Messiah Of Evil is one of the great lost films. Made by screenwriting team Willard Hyuck and Gloria Katz right before their breakout success writing American Graffiti, it details the unsettling relationship between a girl, her mysterious painter father, and a Northern California town full of bloodthirsty catatonic everyday people. There are standout zombie attacks in a supermarket and a movie theatre, as well as an appearance by ‘70s gay film icon Michael Greer – making the film an off-kilter killer.

Dir. Willard Hyuck, 1973, 35mm, 85 min.

Fox and His Friends

fox and his friends
6/8 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

For those who prefer their trenchant class commentary served with a side of beefcake, Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Fox and His Friends drops a rags-to-riches Cinderella tale into the singular milieu of the 1970s Munich gay scene. After a blue-collar bathroom cruiser and erstwhile circus freak (played with deep empathy by Fassbinder himself) wins a small fortune on the lottery, the sudden boost in social status that this fortune affords places him among company far more treacherous than the crooks, queens, and hustlers he knew on the street.

With painterly compositions (featuring a cheekily phallocentric mise-en-scène) and a brilliant tone at once deadpan and melodramatic, Fox and His Friends extracts curious humor and sincere humanity from a fall to ruin as heartbreaking as it is ultimately predictable. You’re likely to watch this nightmare of a love story through parted fingers, waiting to flinch.

Dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1975, 35mm, 123 min.

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