Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/20, 2:45pm)

whydontyou_website1
12/20 - 2:45PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

An Evening With Antonio Fargas (feat. "Putney Swope"!)

antoniofargas_website
12/20 - 6PM
$12/free for members

It’s been our pleasure to celebrate a wide variety of character actors throughout Cinefamily’s years, but we’ve never had a guest with the ability to be so sharp, so smooth and so sly all at the same time. Known internationally for his landmark role as “Huggy Bear” on Starsky & Hutch, Antonio Fargas’ career now spans into its sixth decade. He’s been a staple of blaxploitation classics like Shaft, Foxy Brown, Car Wash and Cleopatra Jones, but he’s also had an illustrious stage career in New York and England alongside dozens of TV guest spots, playing a fearless panoply of out-there cats. Whenever this dude enters a scene, all heads immediately turn to him. His charisma is undeniable and his style, as RuPaul would say, is sickening. Come sit a spell with Antonio, as he regales us with a stream of stories from throughout his incredible ride. Plus, after the break, we’ll settle into a screening of Robert Downey, Sr.’s 1969 counterculture classic Putney Swope, featuring Antonio in one of his earliest, craziest, most verbally geometric roles.
Putney Swope Dir. Robert Downey, Sr., 1969, DCP, 84 min.

Watch an excerpt of Antonio Fargas in “Putney Swope”!
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Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/20, 9:00pm)

whydontyou_website3
12/20 - 9PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

HEAVY MIDNITES: Home Alone

homealone_website
12/20 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

How did a story about child neglect, bloody vigilante combat, breaking and entering, a scary old man, tarantulas, and face-searing electric-iron catapults (among other atrocities) become a heartwarming, seasonal family blockbuster? Simple: it sprung from director Chris Columbus (in his golden post-Adventures in Babysitting, pre-Bicentennial Man moment) and writer John Hughes (in his golden post-Ferris Beuller, pre-Beethoven, Beethoven’s 2nd, Beethoven’s 3rd, Beethoven’s 4th moment). Those who saw this film when it came out in 1990 — uh, this means you, for we all saw it — will remember that it’s actually funny, lively, and excellently cast (remember the part with John Candy? No? It’s great!) Scrappy little nudnik Kevin McAllister (Macaulay Culkin, in his golden post-Uncle Buck, pre-pubescent moment) raised the bar for precocious urchins everywhere, while seminal character actors Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern co-star as the Keystone Kops of ill-advised burglary. Also, there’s some stuff about Christmas.
Dir. Chris Columbus, 1990, 35mm, 103 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “Home Alone”!

The Search For Weng Weng (filmmaker in person!)

wengweng666
12/21 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

All the way from Down Under, filmmaker Andrew Leavold in person! The Guinness Book of World Records lists Ernesto de la Cruz as the “shortest adult actor in a leading role”, but that doesn’t come close to capturing the real heart and soul of his alter ego Weng Weng: the toast of the Filipino low-budget action film community, karaoke partner of Imelda Marcos and the subject of many a viral video. Coming in at 2’9”, Weng Weng starred in such time-honored James Bond spoofs as For Y’ur Height Only and The Impossible Kid — but after his early death in 1992, nearly every detail about his life remained a mystery to the outside world. After years of obsessive research and filming, Australian guerrilla director Andrew Leavold has finally amassed the definitive portrait of this cup-sized dynamo. All hail Agent 00!
Dir. Andrew Leavold, 2014, DCP, 92 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Search For Weng Weng”!

A Secret Protest Screening (presented by Secret Cinema)

secretcinema_website
12/21 - 7:30PM
all tickets $12

We think what’s happened with The Interview is plain wrong. It sets a terrible precedent, and we feel, as an independent movie theater, we should do whatever we can to support any filmmaker or film studio’s right to free speech. When Secret Cinema (one of the UK’s great organizers of pop-up movie events) contacted us, letting us know they were putting together a global round of secret screenings in protest against censorship, we of course agreed to take part. As per Secret Cinema tradition, we ask all to wear dark suits, and bring a small gift to give to a stranger. All proceeds from this screening will go to global free-speech charity Article 19.

NOTE: we will not be showing Sony’s The Interview during this timeslot. The film title will remain secret for now.

NOTE TO MEMBERS: unfortunately we cannot offer free Member tickets to this event. All Members, please do not use your Membership number as a coupon code to this event, when acquiring tickets.

VIDEO NIGHTS: A Video Nights Christmas Smorgasboard (feat. "Elves"!)

videonights_xmas_website
12/21 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

The holiday season is that special time when you don’t necessarily want to die, but you kind of don’t want to be alive anymore. It’s basically one month-long panic attack — and, try as you may, you know there’s no escaping. The found-footagers at Everything Is Terrible! know exactly how you feel, and have gone to great lengths to find the most shit-brained content ever made for the season. Don’t run from the cloying ads, the repetitive music, and the mushy-gushyness of it all; you know it’ll find you and hunt you down eventually, so just accept your fate and enjoy the weirdness. Cozy up by the proverbial fireplace with EIT!’s Ghoul Skool, as he takes you on a holiday rollercoaster ride of old ads, TV specials, public access freakouts and more. Want to know the connection between the elves and the Nazis? LET’S FIND OUT AS A FAMILY as we watch the bafflingly perfect 1989 videomatic nugget Elves, starring Dan Haggerty (of “Grizzly Adams” fame) battling genetically engineered Xmas monsters born out of Hitler’s slimy plans for world domination (whew!)
Elves Dir. Jeffrey Mandel, 1989, analog presentation, 89 min.

Watch the trailer for “Elves”!
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DOUG BENSON MOVIE INTERRUPTION: The Long Kiss Goodnight

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12/22 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Paul F. Tompkins to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.
Dir. Renny Harlin, 1996, 35mm, 121 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Long Kiss Goodnight”!
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Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/22)

whydontyou_website4
12/22 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

It's A Wonderful Life (12/23)

wonderfullife600_1
12/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“It’s a great — really great — film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.” — Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.” — Dave Kehr

It’s a Wonderful Life has earned its legion of followers because it effectively touches upon one basic truth of life that we all would like to believe — that each of us, no matter how apparently insignificant, has the power to make a difference.” — Reelviews

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations — if you watch it once a year, every year — if you’ve never seen it before — or if you fall somewhere in-between — then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.
Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “It’s A Wonderful Life”!

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/23)

WDYPiH2_480
12/23 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

It's A Wonderful Life (12/24, 4pm)

wonderfullife600_2
12/24 - 4PM
$12/free for members

“It’s a great — really great — film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.” — Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.” — Dave Kehr

It’s a Wonderful Life has earned its legion of followers because it effectively touches upon one basic truth of life that we all would like to believe — that each of us, no matter how apparently insignificant, has the power to make a difference.” — Reelviews

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations — if you watch it once a year, every year — if you’ve never seen it before — or if you fall somewhere in-between — then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.
Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “It’s A Wonderful Life”!

It's A Wonderful Life (12/24, 7pm)

wonderfullife600_3
12/24 - 7PM
$12/free for members

“It’s a great — really great — film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.” — Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.” — Dave Kehr

It’s a Wonderful Life has earned its legion of followers because it effectively touches upon one basic truth of life that we all would like to believe — that each of us, no matter how apparently insignificant, has the power to make a difference.” — Reelviews

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations — if you watch it once a year, every year — if you’ve never seen it before — or if you fall somewhere in-between — then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.
Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “It’s A Wonderful Life”!

It's A Wonderful Life (12/24, 9:50pm)

wonderfullife600_4
12/24 - 9:50PM
$12/free for members

“It’s a great — really great — film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.” — Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.” — Dave Kehr

It’s a Wonderful Life has earned its legion of followers because it effectively touches upon one basic truth of life that we all would like to believe — that each of us, no matter how apparently insignificant, has the power to make a difference.” — Reelviews

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations — if you watch it once a year, every year — if you’ve never seen it before — or if you fall somewhere in-between — then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.
Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “It’s A Wonderful Life”!

Greaser's Palace (12/26)

greasers4_website
12/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“This isn’t Texas, and it isn’t The Twilight Zone. You’ve just crossed over into the territory known as the Theater of the Absurd.” — DVDTalk

After years of absence from the big screen, Robert Downey, Sr.’s grandest cinematic statement comes to Cinefamily in a brand-new 35mm print we’ve struck especially for this tribute! Greaser’s Palace finds Downey at his most trippy, pastoral, and introspective — all qualities that blend with the filmmaker’s anarchic style to produce his most lionhearted work. Armed with his trademark platoon of offbeat character actors and willing amateurs mixed together in a lunatic stew, Downey weaves a Jesus/New Testament allegory across the stitches of an absurdist Western parody. Expect no Mel Brooks-style romp; here, we glide along on the work’s own vastly unique cadence, with its graceful extended takes, fuzzy arcs and fearless approach to subverting audience norms. Downey remains a true underground artist who’s never once given over to worrying if an audience meets his gaze, and Greaser’s Palace — originally financed on a fluke and tragically underseen across its four-decade existence — is a vibrant testament to his unwavering freak-flag spirit.
Dir. Robert Downey, Sr., 1972, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Greaser’s Palace”!
YouTube Preview Image

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/26)

whydontyou_website1
12/26 - 9:50PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

It's A Wonderful Life (12/27)

wonderfullife600_1
12/27 - 4PM
$12/free for members

“It’s a great — really great — film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.” — Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.” — Dave Kehr

It’s a Wonderful Life has earned its legion of followers because it effectively touches upon one basic truth of life that we all would like to believe — that each of us, no matter how apparently insignificant, has the power to make a difference.” — Reelviews

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations — if you watch it once a year, every year — if you’ve never seen it before — or if you fall somewhere in-between — then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.
Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “It’s A Wonderful Life”!

Greaser's Palace (12/27, 7:00pm)

greasers2_website
12/27 - 7PM
$12/free for members

“This isn’t Texas, and it isn’t The Twilight Zone. You’ve just crossed over into the territory known as the Theater of the Absurd.” — DVDTalk

After years of absence from the big screen, Robert Downey, Sr.’s grandest cinematic statement comes to Cinefamily in a brand-new 35mm print we’ve struck especially for this tribute! Greaser’s Palace finds Downey at his most trippy, pastoral, and introspective — all qualities that blend with the filmmaker’s anarchic style to produce his most lionhearted work. Armed with his trademark platoon of offbeat character actors and willing amateurs mixed together in a lunatic stew, Downey weaves a Jesus/New Testament allegory across the stitches of an absurdist Western parody. Expect no Mel Brooks-style romp; here, we glide along on the work’s own vastly unique cadence, with its graceful extended takes, fuzzy arcs and fearless approach to subverting audience norms. Downey remains a true underground artist who’s never once given over to worrying if an audience meets his gaze, and Greaser’s Palace — originally financed on a fluke and tragically underseen across its four-decade existence — is a vibrant testament to his unwavering freak-flag spirit.
Dir. Robert Downey, Sr., 1972, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Greaser’s Palace”!
YouTube Preview Image

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/27)

whydontyou_website3
12/27 - 9:15PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

HEAVY MIDNITES: Spice World

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12/27 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Climb aboard the double decker Spice Bus and get ready for a madcap musical adventure packed with GIRL POWER! Victoria, Emma, Mel B, Geri and Mel C are dressed to kill, and thoroughly prepared to spice up your lives with the group’s fabulous feature film debut (and, sadly, finale — although, who knows?) Sassy, saucy and non-stop fun, Spice World finds our Spice Girls doing a modern day media-obsessed update of The Monkees’ Head, crossed with the Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night. Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, the girls engage in escalating English escapades (haunted mansions, extraterrestrial encounters and even more surreal excitement) as they gear up for the biggest performance of their lives at London’s Royal Albert Hall. Bursting with feverish propulsion, a you-just-gotta-join-in soundtrack of mega-hits & mega-moves, plus a supporting cast of top-tier character actors (Alan Cumming, Richard E. Grant, Barry Humphries) and wild cameo appearances, Spice World will have you never giving up on the good times.
Dir. Bob Spiers, 1997, 35mm, 93 min.

Watch the trailer for “Spice World”!
YouTube Preview Image

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/28, 3:30pm)

WDYPiH4_480
12/28 - 3:30PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

GREG PROOPS FILM CLUB: My Man Godfrey

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12/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for one of the most screwy of all screwball comedies from the Thirties. Greg sez: “In this year of discord we celebrate the holidays with an anti-rich people movie. My Man Godfrey is one picture that can justly be described as delightful. The debonair William Powell is homeless (that alone was a big laugh, for he also played the distinctly upscale detective The Thin Man) when two rich, shallow sisters (the fabulous Carole Lombard and the feisty Gail Patrick) on a scavenger hunt convince him to come uptown and be gaped at by callous sophisticates for five bucks. When he does, he’s disgusted by how mindless and insipid the rich are; the family is a living trainwreck of abuse and eccentricities. Horses in the living room, a live-in gigolo and unswerving vapidity. This movie anticipates the nation-state of Kardashia, and pays off big time. Let’s have a fun revolution. Forget the guillotines. Brandish some wit. Join us, you will, loves.”
Dir. Gregory La Cava, 1936, 35mm, 93 min.

Q: Does Greg talk over the movies, like the Benson Interruption?
A: No. It is a recording of his podcast, followed by a screening of the film.

Watch an excerpt from “My Man Godfrey”!
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Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/28, 10:20pm)

whydontyou_website4
12/28 - 10:20PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

It's A Wonderful Life (12/29)

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12/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“It’s a great — really great — film, so densely well made that to watch any three minutes is to realize how paltry the vast majority of movies are by comparison.” — Richard T. Jameson

“The epiphany of movie sentiment and a transcendent experience.” — Dave Kehr

It’s a Wonderful Life has earned its legion of followers because it effectively touches upon one basic truth of life that we all would like to believe — that each of us, no matter how apparently insignificant, has the power to make a difference.” — Reelviews

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations — if you watch it once a year, every year — if you’ve never seen it before — or if you fall somewhere in-between — then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.
Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “It’s A Wonderful Life”!

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/29)

WDYPiH2_480
12/29 - 10:40PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/30)

whydontyou_website1
12/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

Why Don't You Play In Hell? (12/30, 10:30pm)

whydontyou_website4
12/30 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“Mankind’s greatest achievement.” — David Erhlich, Film.com

The once-in-a-generation filmmaker behind Love Exposure, Cold Fish and Guilty of Romance is back with yet another endlessly irreverent, wild and hilariously visceral big-screen thrill that’s almost too much for words. Even in a cinematic landscape where every second or third Japanese film is totally crazy-pants, Sion Sono’s body of work is unparalleled in its ability to seamlessly blend a melee of outré ideas with such a solidly humanist core. His latest to hit Stateside, Why Don’t You Play In Hell? is a love letter to the yakuza movies of yore, to the local Cinefamily-esque “film clubs” of his youth and to 35mm film itself. There’s a war going on, but that won’t stop the inexperienced, wannabe crew The Fuck Bombers from making the ultimate action epic of their dreams. Their wish comes true in the form of a yakuza boss who, on the eve of his revenge against a deadly rival, bankrolls the Bombers’ masterpiece: a real, live blood-soaked gangster battle to the death — captured on 35mm! Infused with his trademark excess and outrageousness, this is Sion Sono with his talent and unique vision totally unleashed.
Dir. Sion Sono, 2013, DCP, 130 min.

To watch the trailer for “Why Don’t You Play In Hell?”, visit the top of this series page!

The Sacrifice (1/2)

sacrifice_website1
1/2 - 7:15PM
$12/free for members

Brand-new 35mm print!  Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film is yet another of his beautifully absorbing and hypnotic portraits of madness.  As aging philosopher Alexander meets with friends at his house on the misty plains of rural Sweden, the radio announces WWIII is at hand.  In an appeasement to God, Alex offers his own voice and sanity in exchange for sparing life on Earth — and when the Bomb doesn’t drop, what is he to do?  Show-stopping cinematography from frequent Bergman collaborator Sven Nykvist (including the most incredibly lifelike, “sun-lit” soundstage interiors since Kubrick’s The Shining) and epic sound design ride alongside Tarkovsky’s masterful deployment of near-imperceptible legerdemain: once Alexander’s life continues as “normal,” every subtle replacement of items and people in the frame throws into question, much like Solaris, the rapid crumbling of an old soul already given to questioning reality.  The Sacrifice is a graceful summation of all Tarkovsky’s auteurly ideals, hopes and dreams up to that point — and sadly is the master’s swan song, painfully hinting at the remainder of a career that was not to be, after his untimely passing in 1986.
Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986, 35mm, 142 min.

Watch an excerpt from “The Sacrifice”!
YouTube Preview Image

Watch Roger Ebert duking it out for “The Sacrifice” on “Siskel & Ebert”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/2)

girlwalks_480_309
1/2 - 10:10PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

Craig Denney's "The Astrologer" (January encore!)

astrologer_website
1/2 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“You’re not an astrologer…YOU’RE AN ASSHOLE!” — Arthyr Chadbourne, in The Astrologer

Our compatriots at Austin, TX’s American Genre Film Archive bring us a lost masterwork of such feverish potency that it immediately evokes memories of Top 10 Cinefamily Bizarro Moments Of All-Time like Dangerous Men, Lost In The Desert and After Last Season. The brainchild of writer/director/star/supposed celebrity astrologer Craig Denney, 1975’s The Astrologer is a self-aggrandizing yet completely dislocating auto-biopic journey into “What makes a world-famous zodiac peddler tick?” Natch, it involves humble beginnings as a carnival huckster, diamond smuggling, African jail, Indiana Jones-level daring-do, carousing in Valley dive bars with haggard-as-hell barflies, an avant-garde film-within-the-film (titled The Astrologer), slo-mo food fights and more Moody Blues than you can handle. No situation is too nutz for Denney to flash his irascible smirk at — and no single scene will ever prepare you for what the next will be. A shattering missive from the outermost limits of cinematic sanity — and the most delirious film find of 2014, discovered amongst the impossible hodgepodge of over one thousand donated 35mm prints from a single humungous batch. HOLY FUCKING SHIT.
Dir. Craig Denney, 1975, 35mm, 77 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “The Astrologer”!

ABD's Saturday Morning Cartoons

abd_saturdaymorning_website
1/3 - 11:30AM
$12/free for members

2014 marked the end of Saturday morning cartoons on television — so in 2015, Animation Breakdown is bringing them to the big screen! It’s a panoply of your favorite classics to the rare and unusual, complete with retro commercials and special guests.

Full description coming soon…

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “ABD’s Saturday Morning Cartoons”!

Tarkovsky's "The Sacrifice" (1/3)

sacrifice_website2
1/3 - 6PM
$12/free for members

Brand-new 35mm print! Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film is yet another of his beautifully absorbing and hypnotic portraits of madness. As aging philosopher Alexander meets with friends at his house on the misty plains of rural Sweden, the radio announces WWIII is at hand. In an appeasement to God, Alex offers his own voice and sanity in exchange for sparing life on Earth — and when the Bomb doesn’t drop, what is he to do? Show-stopping cinematography from frequent Bergman collaborator Sven Nykvist (including the most incredibly lifelike, “sun-lit” soundstage interiors since Kubrick’s The Shining) and epic sound design ride alongside Tarkovsky’s masterful deployment of near-imperceptible legerdemain: once Alexander’s life continues as “normal,” every subtle replacement of items and people in the frame throws into question, much like Solaris, the rapid crumbling of an old soul already given to questioning reality. The Sacrifice is a graceful summation of all Tarkovsky’s auteurly ideals, hopes and dreams up to that point — and sadly is the master’s swan song, painfully hinting at the remainder of a career that was not to be, after his untimely passing in 1986.
Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986, 35mm, 142 min.

Watch an excerpt from “The Sacrifice”!
YouTube Preview Image

Watch Roger Ebert duking it out for “The Sacrifice” on “Siskel & Ebert”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/3)

girlwalks2_480_309
1/3 - 9:15PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

HEAVY MIDNITES: Mad Max

madmax_480_309
1/3 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. George Miller, 1979, 35mm, 95 min.

Watch the trailer for “Mad Max”!
YouTube Preview Image

Tarkovsky's "The Sacrifice" (1/4)

sacrifice_website3
1/4 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand-new 35mm print! Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film is yet another of his beautifully absorbing and hypnotic portraits of madness. As aging philosopher Alexander meets with friends at his house on the misty plains of rural Sweden, the radio announces WWIII is at hand. In an appeasement to God, Alex offers his own voice and sanity in exchange for sparing life on Earth — and when the Bomb doesn’t drop, what is he to do? Show-stopping cinematography from frequent Bergman collaborator Sven Nykvist (including the most incredibly lifelike, “sun-lit” soundstage interiors since Kubrick’s The Shining) and epic sound design ride alongside Tarkovsky’s masterful deployment of near-imperceptible legerdemain: once Alexander’s life continues as “normal,” every subtle replacement of items and people in the frame throws into question, much like Solaris, the rapid crumbling of an old soul already given to questioning reality. The Sacrifice is a graceful summation of all Tarkovsky’s auteurly ideals, hopes and dreams up to that point — and sadly is the master’s swan song, painfully hinting at the remainder of a career that was not to be, after his untimely passing in 1986.
Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986, 35mm, 142 min.

Watch an excerpt from “The Sacrifice”!
YouTube Preview Image

Watch Roger Ebert duking it out for “The Sacrifice” on “Siskel & Ebert”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/4)

girlwalks3_480_309
1/4 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

Tarkovsky's "The Sacrifice" (1/5)

sacrifice_website4
1/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand-new 35mm print! Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film is yet another of his beautifully absorbing and hypnotic portraits of madness. As aging philosopher Alexander meets with friends at his house on the misty plains of rural Sweden, the radio announces WWIII is at hand. In an appeasement to God, Alex offers his own voice and sanity in exchange for sparing life on Earth — and when the Bomb doesn’t drop, what is he to do? Show-stopping cinematography from frequent Bergman collaborator Sven Nykvist (including the most incredibly lifelike, “sun-lit” soundstage interiors since Kubrick’s The Shining) and epic sound design ride alongside Tarkovsky’s masterful deployment of near-imperceptible legerdemain: once Alexander’s life continues as “normal,” every subtle replacement of items and people in the frame throws into question, much like Solaris, the rapid crumbling of an old soul already given to questioning reality. The Sacrifice is a graceful summation of all Tarkovsky’s auteurly ideals, hopes and dreams up to that point — and sadly is the master’s swan song, painfully hinting at the remainder of a career that was not to be, after his untimely passing in 1986.
Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986, 35mm, 142 min.

Watch an excerpt from “The Sacrifice”!
YouTube Preview Image

Watch Roger Ebert duking it out for “The Sacrifice” on “Siskel & Ebert”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/5)

girlwalks_480_309
1/5 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

Tarkovsky's "The Sacrifice" (1/6)

sacrifice_website1
1/6 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand-new 35mm print! Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film is yet another of his beautifully absorbing and hypnotic portraits of madness. As aging philosopher Alexander meets with friends at his house on the misty plains of rural Sweden, the radio announces WWIII is at hand. In an appeasement to God, Alex offers his own voice and sanity in exchange for sparing life on Earth — and when the Bomb doesn’t drop, what is he to do? Show-stopping cinematography from frequent Bergman collaborator Sven Nykvist (including the most incredibly lifelike, “sun-lit” soundstage interiors since Kubrick’s The Shining) and epic sound design ride alongside Tarkovsky’s masterful deployment of near-imperceptible legerdemain: once Alexander’s life continues as “normal,” every subtle replacement of items and people in the frame throws into question, much like Solaris, the rapid crumbling of an old soul already given to questioning reality. The Sacrifice is a graceful summation of all Tarkovsky’s auteurly ideals, hopes and dreams up to that point — and sadly is the master’s swan song, painfully hinting at the remainder of a career that was not to be, after his untimely passing in 1986.
Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1986, 35mm, 142 min.

Watch an excerpt from “The Sacrifice”!
YouTube Preview Image

Watch Roger Ebert duking it out for “The Sacrifice” on “Siskel & Ebert”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/6)

girlwalks2_480_309
1/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/7)

girlwalks3_480_309
1/7 - 8PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: Sound & Vision

lostandfound_soundandvision_website
1/7 - 10:30PM
$10/free for members

Lost & Found Film Club presents a carefully curated mix of ephemeral, industrial, educational, and sponsored films in the gloriously fuzzed-out 16mm format — plus, grilled cheese sandwiches will be available! Any given program may contain children’s films, social engineering and training films, advertisements, mental hygiene madness, animation, documentaries, student experiments, home movies on rusted reels — pretty much anything that isn’t a commercial feature film. Did we forget to mention that GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICHES WILL BE AVAILABLE?!

Watch an excerpt from the Scott Bartlett film “OnOff”!
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A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night (1/8)

girlwalks_480_309
1/8 - 7:45PM
$12/free for members

“Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town — home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps and other sordid souls — is a bastion of depravity and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire stalks its most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, a most unusual love story blossoms blood-red. The debut feature Ana Lily Amirpour, cinema’s first Iranian vampire western basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful stew of genre, archetype, and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno, and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the weird surrealism of David Lynch. Above all, Amirpour’s tale of love and squalor is fun. Why else would a vampire ride a skateboard?” (Sundance Film Festival)
Dir. Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night”!
YouTube Preview Image

YouTube Paarty: January '15

youtubepaarty_jan_website
1/8 - 10:30PM
$5/free for members

Insanely low view count? Check.
Incredible wealth of bored eccentrics on display? Check.
Impossible-to-predict mindset of the uploader? Check.
Indescribable, inscrutable, and quite possibly impressive? Likely.

We tried this back in November, and it felt pretty good. It’s the second in an experimental series of public Cinefamily YouTube spelunkings. Over the years, we’ve accumulated such a juicy cache of bookmarks begging to be audience test-driven that it was absurd we weren’t sharing them with you in an organized fashion. Plus, some of the greatest nights (and greatest belly laughs) of our programming staff’s lives have been those impromptu jaunts through YouTube’s dusty back alleys. Come board the monorail, and whoosh around the world’s largest repository of video detritus LIVE for your amusement/bemusement. Plus, we’ll have snacks.

Force Majeure (1/9)

forcemajeure_website4
1/9 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2014, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Force Majeure”!
YouTube Preview Image

THE SILENT TREATMENT: William Wellman's "You Never Know Women"

youneverknowwomen_website
1/10 - 2PM
$12/free for members

For a feller who claimed to vastly prefer working with male actors rather than female ones, director William Wellman certainly knew how to construct a lush romantic lark. After a string of dusty oaters in the first half of the Twenties (and before the machismo of films like Wings, The Public Enemy and The Call of the Wild), Wellman turned his sights on this highly unusual circus romance. This high-flying jaunt stars Florence Vidor as the vamp in the middle of a love triangle between her acrobat partner in a kooky circus troupe. Yup, think clowns, magicians, Houdini-esque escapes and knife-throwing delights, all alongside the silly harumphing of society types and the behind-the-scenes thrills of a showbiz exposé.
Dir. William A. Wellman, 1926, 35mm, approx. 60 min. (Print courtesy of the Library of Congress)

RUBEN OSTLUND IN PERSON: Play (1/10)

play_ruben_website
1/10 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…Filmmaker Ruben Östlund in person!
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2011, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Play”!
YouTube Preview Image

RUBEN OSTLUND IN PERSON: Force Majeure (1/10)

forcemajeure_ruben_website
1/10 - 7:15PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…Filmmaker Ruben Östlund in person!
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2014, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Force Majeure”!
YouTube Preview Image

HEAVY MIDNITES: River's Edge

riversedge_480_309
1/10 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Tim Hunter, 1986, 35mm, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “River’s Edge”!

MEMBERS-ONLY POTLUCK: Doug Benson watches the Golden Globes!

dougbenson_goldenglobes_website
1/11 - 3:30PM
free for Cinefamily members +1

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

POTLUCK/PODCAST TAPING: 3:30pm-4:30pm
“DA SHOW”: 4:30pm-approx. 8:00pm

Before the show, we’ll be taping a new episode of the “Dining With Doug And Karen” podcast — hosted by Doug Benson and Karen Anderson. This event is indeed a potluck; things like bags of chips and drinks are not encouraged — please bring a dish, and impress Doug & Karen with your culinary chops as they sample everyone’s creations live on the podcast.

Doug will also be live-Tweeting throughout the show; follow him on Twitter!

This event is a Cinefamily members-only show, but members can bring a +1. If this is the kind of event that you want more of in your life, then now’s the perfect time to sign up for a CINEFAMILY MEMBERSHIP.

Force Majeure (1/11)

forcemajeure_website5
1/11 - 9PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2014, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Force Majeure”!
YouTube Preview Image

Force Majeure (1/12)

forcemajeure_website1
1/12 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2014, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Force Majeure”!
YouTube Preview Image

Force Majeure (1/13)

forcemajeure_website2
1/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2014, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Force Majeure”!
YouTube Preview Image

DOUG BENSON MOVIE INTERRUPTION: Annabelle

dougbenson_annabelle_website
1/14 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Paul F. Tompkins to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.
Dir. John R. Leonetti, 2014, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the trailer for “Annabelle”!
YouTube Preview Image

Force Majeure (1/14)

forcemajeure_website3
1/14 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2014, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Force Majeure”!
YouTube Preview Image

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Classic Animated Music Videos REMIXED!

abd_classicmusicvideos_website
1/15 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by EVERYTHING IS TERRIBLE!

All of your favorite ’80s/’90s animated music videos — presented in live remixes of the songs by special guests! Sing karaoke on the big screen to your most cherished MTV memories!

(Full description coming soon…)

Watch the vintage Paula Abdul animated music video “Opposites Attract”!
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Involuntary

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1/17 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2008, DCP, 98 min.

Watch the trailer for “Involuntary”!
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Play (1/18)

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1/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2011, DCP, 118 min.

Watch the trailer for “Play”!
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The Guitar Mongoloid + Ruben Ostlund Shorts

guitarmongoloid_website
1/24 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
The Guitar Mongoloid Dir. Ruben Östlund, 2004, DCP, 89 min.

HEAVY MIDNITES: Just One of the Guys (30th Anniversary, plus cast reunion!)

justoneoftheguys_website
1/24 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

NOTE: this show will place at 10:30pm, rather than midnight.

Description coming soon…Director Lisa Gottlieb, plus stars Joyce Hyser and Toni Hudson in person!
Dir. Lisa Gottlieb, 1985, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Just One of the Guys”!
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LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: Eroticon

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2/11 - 10:30PM
$10/free for members

This year, Valentine’s Day comes prematurely. Direct from the estate sale of a notoriously shameless 42nd Street smut merchant comes: Eroticon. “An exotic tapestry of emotions, sensations and ideas…one step beyond experience,” screamed the original “EX-Rated” poster. This quasi-doc mondo romp doesn’t just give a peek inside the sex-plosion of the early 70′s, it bumps and grinds all over it with a bevy of hilarious interviews punctuating groovy grindhouse montages of ham-fisted hardcore. Meet the editor of Screw Magazine, get the wet-hot truth on the burgeoning porno industry, talk to an accredited sexpert, visit a naughty boutique and learn about the early days of personal ads that put Craigslist to shame. Sure, there’s orgies, awkward BDSM and the obligatory bumping of uglies, but the main attraction here is the soundtrack — engorged with original would-be hits like “Fuck Me Forever.” Bonus cameo by renowned children’s book illustrator Tomi Ungerer! Don your trenchcoat for this impossibly rare screening of what might be the world’s only surviving print?
Dir. Barnard L. Sackett, 35mm, 1973, 88 min.

Listen to a song from the soundtrack to “Eroticon”!YouTube Preview Image

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Devin Flynn & Friends

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2/12 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Most well known for his Webby-awarded series Y’all So Stupid, Devin Flynn has animated for an all-star selection of tripped-out wonders: Wonder Showzen, Aquateen Hunger Force Movie, Xavier: Renegade Angel and Yo Gabba Gabba, as well as music videos for Flying Lotus and The Alchemist. Join Devin and friends for a night of weird and wooly clips!

Watch the pilot for Devin Flynn’s “SuperStupid”!
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