Ladies & Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen + Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970

gleam
12/4 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Don’t Knock the Rock

Throughout his 60 year career, Leonard Cohen’s intrepid quest for truth and beauty led him through many transformations. From bright eyed post-collegiate bard, to silver tongued brooding troubadour, to gruff cigarette-and-whiskey-soaked casanova, to Zen Buddhist high priest of song. His early days though, as he grew from literary star into one of the most revered songwriters of any generation, are arguably his most fascinating. Placed side by side, Ladies and Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen and Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970 serve as spellbinding documents of that transformation.

Ladies & Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen
Produced by the National Film Board of Canada in 1965, two years before his musical career began, Ladies and Gentlemen is a jazzy snapshot of Cohen the poet. It follows him at age 30, already renowned with 3 books of poetry and a novel under his belt, as he visits his wintry hometown of Montreal. As though mesmerized by his charisma, the cameras fix on him as he gives readings to enraptured audiences, gets a haircut, and wanders around the snowy streets, exploring as if taking notes for future verses.

Dirs. Donald Brittain & Don Owen, 1965, 16mm, 45 min.

Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970
Five years and two albums later at the Isle of Wight festival, Cohen was roused from sleep at 4am. He took to the stage, scruffy, bleary and sporting his pajamas, before a huge restless crowd. The fest is notorious for its bad vibes, but once Cohen – and his outstanding band – kicked in he hypnotized the masses with what would be one of his most mythic performances. At turns shambolic, rousing, and haunting, the set was packed with some of his greatest songs (most notably an early version of Famous Blue Raincoat). Fortunately, Academy Award winning documentarian Murray Lerner was there to capture it and the resulting film, which took nearly 40 years to be released, is epic. To watch Live at the Isle of Wight is to bear witness to Cohen’s ascent, from poet and folk singer to the strata of legends.

Dir. Murray Lerner, 2009, Blu Ray, 64 min.

Preceded by Poen. Dir. Josef Reeve, 1967, 16mm, 4 min.

Bird on a Wire

bird-swr-1
12/4 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Don’t Knock the Rock

The world grew a bit dimmer with the passing of the great Leonard Cohen. Nowhere is his dogged pursuit of grace more perfectly captured than Tony Palmer’s incredible, long lost Bird on a Wire. Following Cohen’s trouble-ridden 1972 European tour, Palmer was given absolute access to his most intimate moments, backstage flirtations, and distress and doubt as the concerts were beset by difficulties. Yet through it all beams Cohen’s intoxicating allure and by the time the film reaches its triumphant climax, as he performs an emotional, holy-like show in Israel, what results is ultimately a film about redemption – one which impeccably embodies the spirit of his poetry. Filled with performances of some of his best loved songs, buried for years and only recently exhumed, Bird on a Wire is not only one of the great tour documentaries, it stands as a perfect paean to the man who wrote, “There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”

Dir. Tony Palmer, 1972, digital presentation, 106 min.

Preceded by Angel. Dir Derek May, 1966, 35mm, 6 min.

The Apartment

apartment
12/7 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for The Apartment.

Greg sez: failed cynic Billy Wilder’s masterpiece on sex, love, and corporate avarice. C.C. Baxter, the awesomely human Jack Lemmon, works as a drone in a faceless megacorp, worming his way up the ladder by letting his creepy bosses have affairs in his crib. He meets vulnerable elevator operator Fran Kubelik—the sensational Shirley MacClaine—who is having an affair with everyone’s boss, Mr. Sheldrake (Fred MacMurray in his greatest role as an adulterous heel). The whole shebang begins to topple on Christmas, when Fran finds out Mr. Sheldrake has been having affairs with all the women in the office. Drunkenness, lechery, infidelity, and humanity get a work over. It’s funny, caustic, real, and lovely. Lift your dragging spirits after this election with a dose of hopeful cynicism. This picture will make you love adult situations acted out by grown ups. That’s the way things crumble, cookie-wise.

Dir. Billy Wilder, 1960, 35mm, 125 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Birth

nicole-kidman-in-birth-(2004)-large-picture
12/8 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Memory

Memory Black Outline - big

Moving beyond the trappings of typical paranormality, Jonathan Glazer’s followup to Sexy Beast only builds on the filmmaker’s career-defining resistance to giving audiences what they think they want. Equally unsettling and entertaining, Glazer’s polarizing Birth uses simple elements—a camera angle, a particular cut within a shot—to dig deeper than the film’s visual starkness first suggests, cutting both emotionally and intellectually through subjective character experiences to explore concepts of doubt, faith, denial, and love within the rigid confines of Manhattan’s stuffy, upper class elite. Penned in cahoots with frequent Buñuel collaborator Jean-Claude Carrière (The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie), lensed by the late, great Harris Savides, and featuring subtle performances from Anne Heche, Ted Levine, Lauren Bacall, and a career-best turn from Nicole Kidman, Birth posits that once the walls of knowing have been taken apart, you can’t unlearn that which you’ve discovered.

Dir. Jonathan Glazer, 2004, 35mm, 100 min.

Watch the trailer!

Bird on a Wire

341
12/8 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Don’t Knock the Rock

The world grew a bit dimmer with the passing of the great Leonard Cohen. Nowhere is his dogged pursuit of grace more perfectly captured than Tony Palmer’s incredible, long lost Bird on a Wire. Following Cohen’s trouble-ridden 1972 European tour, Palmer was given absolute access to his most intimate moments, backstage flirtations, and distress and doubt as the concerts were beset by difficulties. Yet through it all beams Cohen’s intoxicating allure and by the time the film reaches its triumphant climax, as he performs an emotional, holy-like show in Israel, what results is ultimately a film about redemption – one which impeccably embodies the spirit of his poetry. Filled with performances of some of his best loved songs, buried for years and only recently exhumed, Bird on a Wire is not only one of the great tour documentaries, it stands as a perfect paean to the man who wrote, “There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”

Dir. Tony Palmer, 1972, digital presentation, 106 min.

Preceded by Angel. Dir Derek May, 1966, 35mm, 6 min.

Babes in Toyland (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

BIT1
12/9 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

The film will be preceded by a puppet show!

Nursery rhymes come to life with eye-popping Technicolor glory in this precocious Disney musical. It starts in the village of Mother Goose Land, where characters from famous lore like Little Bo Beep and Jack Be Nimble live and play together. But all is thrown in this prismatic paradise when snidely town miser Barnaby (Ray Bolger, The Wizard of Oz’s The Scarecrow) schemes to steal the hand of Mary, Mary Quite Contrary from her new husband Tom, Tom, the Piper’s Son. When Barnaby kidnaps Tom, Mary and children in town have to adventure deep into the Forest of No Return to get him back. Even if the story weren’t so joyously watchable and clever, the Oscar-nominated production design and musical numbers would be enough to make the experience unforgettable: everything in this movie is so richly creative, right up to its ecstatic, postmodern self-awareness.

Dir. Jack Donohue, 1961, 16mm, 106 min.

Town Bloody Hall

townbloodyhall_320_175
12/9 - 7:45PM
$12/free for members

On April 30th, 1971, a young D.A. Pennebaker shot a panel on the subject of Women’s Liberation. A curious, second-wave era format was put forth: the panel would consist of ringleader Norman Mailer (hot on the tails of the publication of his incendiary The Prisoner of Sex) and four female, feminist (though not necessarily like-minded) panelists: president of the National Organization for Women (NOW) Jacqueline Ceballos, the beguiling and whip-smart author Germaine Greer, literary critic Diana Trilling (Mailer’s clear favorite), and writer and critic Jill Johnston (who puts forth the panel’s most theatrical component: a poetic, lesbian manifesto). What begins as a “panel” quickly devolves into a farcical trial of the stubborn, bravado-y Mailer, who can’t seem to stop himself from throwing out winners like “you’re all singularly without wit!” and “be a lady!”, his face filling Pennebaker’s patient frame. And the stars of the moment aren’t just on stage—they’re in the audience too; the panel fields questions from the likes of Betty Friedan, Susan Sontag, and Elizabeth Hardwick. Despite the event’s high profile, high energy, high voltage status, Pennebaker stashed the footage away—that is, until he met Hegedus several years later. At her urging, Town Bloody Hall became the first film the duo completed together, reminding us—in the era of twitter-quips and declarations of the lost art of debate—that the competition between wit and furor has always raged, in foolish and brilliant minds alike.

Dir Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker, 1979, Digibeta, 85 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Ladies & Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen + Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970

cohen-tub-esquire
12/9 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Don’t Knock the Rock

Throughout his 60 year career, Leonard Cohen’s intrepid quest for truth and beauty led him through many transformations. From bright eyed post-collegiate bard, to silver tongued brooding troubadour, to gruff cigarette-and-whiskey-soaked casanova, to Zen Buddhist high priest of song. His early days though, as he grew from literary star into one of the most revered songwriters of any generation, are arguably his most fascinating. Placed side by side, Ladies and Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen and Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970 serve as spellbinding documents of that transformation.

Ladies & Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen
Produced by the National Film Board of Canada in 1965, two years before his musical career began, Ladies and Gentlemen is a jazzy snapshot of Cohen the poet. It follows him at age 30, already renowned with 3 books of poetry and a novel under his belt, as he visits his wintry hometown of Montreal. As though mesmerized by his charisma, the cameras fix on him as he gives readings to enraptured audiences, gets a haircut, and wanders around the snowy streets, exploring as if taking notes for future verses.

Dirs. Donald Brittain & Don Owen, 1965, 16mm, 45 min.

Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970
Five years and two albums later at the Isle of Wight festival, Cohen was roused from sleep at 4am. He took to the stage, scruffy, bleary and sporting his pajamas, before a huge restless crowd. The fest is notorious for its bad vibes, but once Cohen – and his outstanding band – kicked in he hypnotized the masses with what would be one of his most mythic performances. At turns shambolic, rousing, and haunting, the set was packed with some of his greatest songs (most notably an early version of Famous Blue Raincoat). Fortunately, Academy Award winning documentarian Murray Lerner was there to capture it and the resulting film, which took nearly 40 years to be released, is epic. To watch Live at the Isle of Wight is to bear witness to Cohen’s ascent, from poet and folk singer to the strata of legends.

Dir. Murray Lerner, 2009, Blu Ray, 64 min.

Preceded by Poen. Dir. Josef Reeve, 1967, 16mm, 4 min.

The Epic of Everest

epic--ice-field-blue-tone-1
12/10 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Climbers George Mallory and Andrew Irvine disappeared on the third attempt to climb Mount Everest—sometime either before or after reaching the summit. In impossibly harsh conditions, with a hand-crank camera, Captain John Noel recorded the beauty of scene and the courage of the climbers; the twin serenity and terror of their isolation. The epic and mysterious climb’s original tints and tones have been beautifully restored by the BFI National Archive, along with a newly commissioned score by Simon Fisher Turner.

Dir. J.B.L. Noel, 1924, DCP, 87 min.

Watch the trailer!

Babes in Toyland (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

babesintoyland-01
12/10 - 2:30PM
$15/free for members

The film will be preceded by a puppet show!

Nursery rhymes come to life with eye-popping Technicolor glory in this precocious Disney musical. It starts in the village of Mother Goose Land, where characters from famous lore like Little Bo Beep and Jack Be Nimble live and play together. But all is thrown in this prismatic paradise when snidely town miser Barnaby (Ray Bolger, The Wizard of Oz’s The Scarecrow) schemes to steal the hand of Mary, Mary Quite Contrary from her new husband Tom, Tom, the Piper’s Son. When Barnaby kidnaps Tom, Mary and children in town have to adventure deep into the Forest of No Return to get him back. Even if the story weren’t so joyously watchable and clever, the Oscar-nominated production design and musical numbers would be enough to make the experience unforgettable: everything in this movie is so richly creative, right up to its ecstatic, postmodern self-awareness.

Dir. Jack Donohue, 1961, 16mm, 106 min.

Bird on a Wire

bird-swr-3
12/11 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Don’t Knock the Rock

The world grew a bit dimmer with the passing of the great Leonard Cohen. Nowhere is his dogged pursuit of grace more perfectly captured than Tony Palmer’s incredible, long lost Bird on a Wire. Following Cohen’s trouble-ridden 1972 European tour, Palmer was given absolute access to his most intimate moments, backstage flirtations, and distress and doubt as the concerts were beset by difficulties. Yet through it all beams Cohen’s intoxicating allure and by the time the film reaches its triumphant climax, as he performs an emotional, holy-like show in Israel, what results is ultimately a film about redemption – one which impeccably embodies the spirit of his poetry. Filled with performances of some of his best loved songs, buried for years and only recently exhumed, Bird on a Wire is not only one of the great tour documentaries, it stands as a perfect paean to the man who wrote, “There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.”

Dir. Tony Palmer, 1972, digital presentation, 106 min.

Preceded by Angel. Dir Derek May, 1966, 35mm, 6 min.

Town Bloody Hall

townbloodyhall_320_175
12/11 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

On April 30th, 1971, a young D.A. Pennebaker shot a panel on the subject of Women’s Liberation. A curious, second-wave era format was put forth: the panel would consist of ringleader Norman Mailer (hot on the tails of the publication of his incendiary The Prisoner of Sex) and four female, feminist (though not necessarily like-minded) panelists: president of the National Organization for Women (NOW) Jacqueline Ceballos, the beguiling and whip-smart author Germaine Greer, literary critic Diana Trilling (Mailer’s clear favorite), and writer and critic Jill Johnston (who puts forth the panel’s most theatrical component: a poetic, lesbian manifesto). What begins as a “panel” quickly devolves into a farcical trial of the stubborn, bravado-y Mailer, who can’t seem to stop himself from throwing out winners like “you’re all singularly without wit!” and “be a lady!”, his face filling Pennebaker’s patient frame. And the stars of the moment aren’t just on stage—they’re in the audience too; the panel fields questions from the likes of Betty Friedan, Susan Sontag, and Elizabeth Hardwick. Despite the event’s high profile, high energy, high voltage status, Pennebaker stashed the footage away—that is, until he met Hegedus several years later. At her urging, Town Bloody Hall became the first film the duo completed together, reminding us—in the era of twitter-quips and declarations of the lost art of debate—that the competition between wit and furor has always raged, in foolish and brilliant minds alike.

Dir Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker, 1979, Digibeta, 85 min.

Ladies & Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen + Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970

leonard-cohen-08-02-13-b
12/11 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Don’t Knock the Rock

Throughout his 60 year career, Leonard Cohen’s intrepid quest for truth and beauty led him through many transformations. From bright eyed post-collegiate bard, to silver tongued brooding troubadour, to gruff cigarette-and-whiskey-soaked casanova, to Zen Buddhist high priest of song. His early days though, as he grew from literary star into one of the most revered songwriters of any generation, are arguably his most fascinating. Placed side by side, Ladies and Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen and Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970 serve as spellbinding documents of that transformation.

Ladies & Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen
Produced by the National Film Board of Canada in 1965, two years before his musical career began, Ladies and Gentlemen is a jazzy snapshot of Cohen the poet. It follows him at age 30, already renowned with 3 books of poetry and a novel under his belt, as he visits his wintry hometown of Montreal. As though mesmerized by his charisma, the cameras fix on him as he gives readings to enraptured audiences, gets a haircut, and wanders around the snowy streets, exploring as if taking notes for future verses.

Dirs. Donald Brittain & Don Owen, 1965, 16mm, 45 min.

Leonard Cohen: Live at the Isle of Wight 1970
Five years and two albums later at the Isle of Wight festival, Cohen was roused from sleep at 4am. He took to the stage, scruffy, bleary and sporting his pajamas, before a huge restless crowd. The fest is notorious for its bad vibes, but once Cohen – and his outstanding band – kicked in he hypnotized the masses with what would be one of his most mythic performances. At turns shambolic, rousing, and haunting, the set was packed with some of his greatest songs (most notably an early version of Famous Blue Raincoat). Fortunately, Academy Award winning documentarian Murray Lerner was there to capture it and the resulting film, which took nearly 40 years to be released, is epic. To watch Live at the Isle of Wight is to bear witness to Cohen’s ascent, from poet and folk singer to the strata of legends.

Dir. Murray Lerner, 2009, Blu Ray, 64 min.

Preceded by Poen. Dir. Josef Reeve, 1967, 16mm, 4 min.

Le père Noël est une ordure

le-pere-noel-est-une-ordure-de-jean-marie-poire-10608518uwrhg_1713
12/15 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Madcap hijinx spiral to distasteful heights, while pratfalls blend seamlessly with domestic abuse, in this frosty carol-cum-eulogy for that piece of garbage, Father Christmas (the title’s literal translation). Two well-meaning but inept volunteers get stuck working the phones at a suicide hotline on Christmas Eve. When their mentally unbalanced callers decide to pay them a visit, their yuletide quest to bring hope to the disenfranchised snowballs into a manic spree of sexual misadventure and holiday-induced violence. The cast is populated by vaunted members of Le Splendide – the French equivalent of Second City – and the film’s untethered, schizophrenic style contrasts their sketch-style profanities with a masterfully rendered, iridescent Parisian night-world. Like the film’s boozed up, gun-toting santa who distributes strip-tease pamphlets to children, Le père Noël est une ordure gleefully reminds us that Christmas is the most wonderful time to kill yourself.

Dir. Jean-Marie Poiré, 1982, Blu Ray, 88 min.

Cult Epics 25th Anniversary featuring ANGST

Angst-002
12/15 - 10:15PM
$12/free for memebrs

Over the past 25 years, Los Angeles based Cult Epics has released nearly 150 of the most sought after, obscure, provocative and previously unknown videos. As admirers and friends of Cult Epics, we’re calling on you, devoted film lovers, to help Cult Epics keep doing what they do! On the occasion of their 25th anniversary, please consider contributing to their Indiegogo campaign. And then join us for one of our very favorite Cult Epics restorations, Angst.

Angst, photographed by legendary Oscar-winning Polish animator/experimentalist/music video director Zbigniew Rybczynski and scored by Krautrock synth god Klaus Schulze (Tangerine Dream), is one hell of a gorgeously stylized and shockingly visceral experience. Erwin Leder (Das Boot, Schindler’s List) plays a maniacal killer based on the real-life serial murderer Werner Kniesek. As he stalks through the bland Viennese countryside, Schulze’s music pulses darkly, and Zbig’s technological astounding “first-person” camerawork—which employed specially-crafted rigs that allowed him to shoot the entire film through a mirror—grabs you by the throat, never letting go. Angst is one film that, without any empty hyperbole, we can guarantee you’ll never, ever forget.

Dir. Gerald Kargl, 1983, DCP, 87 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Love Actually

47da83e8-441d-421e-88b3-dd6777fc2bf1
12/16 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

How to describe Richard Curtis’s Love Actually? As a veritable who’s-who of British loneliness? “The 22% most discussed movie of 2003″ (Metacritic)? “Cloying, deceitful, and more or less irresistible;” “A highly engineered puffball;” “…A terrific film” (Rotten Tomatoes)?

Well, of this we’re sure: this yuletide-story-of-many-love-stories has all the warmth of a sentient ICYHOT hellbent on destruction and all the thrills of a 24-hour PBS holiday telethon, while casting its sugary spell so violently you’ll need a new pancreas by hour two. But can we complain? Love Actually is a noughties classic nobody asked for but everyone needs, with a star-mottled cast that includes Quai Gon Jin (Liam Neeson), Professors Trelawney and Snape (Emma Thompson, the late Alan Rickman), Hugh Grant, and Bill Nighy as an aged rock n’ roll legend.

If you need – like we all do, so desperately – to revisit a time of gel pens and “The Simple Life,” when Brexit was just a twinkle in some Oxford chum’s eye – join us for a special holiday screening of Harry Potter and the Twenty-Seven Meet-Cutes, also known as Love Actually.

Dir. Richard Curtis, 2003, DCP, 135 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Autopsy of Jane Doe (Free sneak peek w/ Emile Hirsch in person!)

film_autopsyofjanedoe-1024x683
12/16 - MIDNITE
Free (first-come, first-served)

Autopsies are well-charted territory in the horror genre, but the genius of The Autopsy of Jane Doe is that Norwegian filmmaker André Øvredal manages to expand the autopsy scene itself into a feature-length exercise in terror and suspense. Anchored by top-tier thespians Brian Cox and Emile Hirsch as a father/son mortician team, Øvredal gets a lot of creepy mileage from the beautifully realized funeral home setting — a rich, shadowy atmosphere awash in dread — as well as the gruesome procedure of the autopsy itself. Øvredal also has a strong script to work from (by Ian B. Goldberg and Richard Niang), which deftly leads to a climax that is both surprising and horrifyingly inevitable. A real shocker that screamed up a storm at Sundance, come see what will surely rank as one of this year’s strongest horror efforts. In theaters and VOD December 21st.

Dir. André Øvredal, 2015, DCP, 99 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. A Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Actress (LA premiere w/ director Robert Greene in conversation with AJ Schnack)

ACTRESS-master1050-v3
12/17 - 6PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by Acropolis Cinema

​Acclaimed documentarian Robert Greene in conversation with AJ Schnack (Kurt Cobain: About a Son; co-founder of Field of Vision) following the screening!

Brandy Burre had a recurring role on The Wire when she got pregnant with the first of her two children. She gave up her career and moved to Beacon, NY. Things were fine for a while. But when she decides to get back into acting, the foundations of her domestic life–as seen by Greene, her then neighbor–prove too fragile for her ambitions. This empathetically framed, verité portrait is a film about starring in your own life. With all these roles to perform, what’s real?

“Burre’s story is the stuff of classic melodrama, and that’s how Greene, astonishingly, films it: his images, with their shrieking colors and vertiginous geometry, suggest the intimate grandeur and bitter irony of a Douglas Sirk romance come to life.” – Richard Brody, The New Yorker

Fake It So Real (Los Angeles premiere w/ director Robert Greene in conversation with David Shoemaker)

fakeitsoreal
12/18 - 4PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by Acropolis Cinema

​Robert Greene in conversation with journalist David Shoemaker (aka the Masked Man) following the screening!

​Fake it So Real follows a ragtag group of wrestlers in North Carolina over the course of a week leading up to a big show. Director Robert Greene’s acclaimed second feature explores what happens when the over-the-top theatrics of the wrestling ring collide with the realities of the working-class South. The wrestlers aren’t paid for their passion, but they treat wrestling like any artist treats their work. (Factory 25)

“Jazz may not be dead, but it doesn’t leave blood on the floor, and there may indeed be something distinctively American about an art that does… Each of the wrestlers comes off as something of a playwright for himself; each has a pseudonym and a repertory of gestures and a mythical past.” – Richard Brody, The New Yorker

Jerry Beck's Christmas Cartoon Special

c3
12/22 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

CHRISTMAS CARTOON CHAOS! Before Charlie Brown, and waaaay before the Grinch, the best (and most bizarre) Christmas cartoons were made for and shown in movie theatres. Our resident animation historian Jerry Beck (Cartoon Research.com) presents the best of these — at the biggest Christmas film party of the year… or at least, of the week!

It's a Wonderful Life

wonderfullife600_2
12/23 - 5PM
$12/free for members

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations; if you watch it once a year, every year; if you’ve never seen it before; or if you fall somewhere in-between—then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.

Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

It's a Wonderful Life

wonderfullife600_5
12/23 - 8:15PM
$12/free for members

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations; if you watch it once a year, every year; if you’ve never seen it before; or if you fall somewhere in-between—then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.

Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

It's a Wonderful Life

wonderfullife600_3
12/24 - 4PM
$12/free for members

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations; if you watch it once a year, every year; if you’ve never seen it before; or if you fall somewhere in-between—then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.

Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

It's a Wonderful Life

wonderfullife600_6
12/24 - 7:15PM
$12/free for members

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations; if you watch it once a year, every year; if you’ve never seen it before; or if you fall somewhere in-between—then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.

Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

It's a Wonderful Life

wonderfullife600_2
12/25 - 7PM
$12/free for members

If you’ve only seen it in scratchy, fuzzy UHF television presentations; if you watch it once a year, every year; if you’ve never seen it before; or if you fall somewhere in-between—then you owe it to yourself, your kids, your parents, your grandkids, your grandparents, the cousins, and any other living human combination to see Frank Capra’s immortal classic on the big screen. Jimmy Stewart was born to play the role of George Bailey, the Everyman whose unflappable spirit (even in the face of the deepest despair) has been of quintessential importance to American popular culture for the last several decades. Having lost not one iota of its emotional power, It’s A Wonderful Life is an unmistakable treasure, and might just be the true meaning of Christmas.

Dir. Frank Capra, 1946, 35mm, 130 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Heiress

708b8af6-25c7-4ca7-8a30-9b522cf4bf23
12/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Struck from the 1947 play of the same name, which was in turn drawn from Henry James’s Washington Square—James did pen so much of the best fodder for adaptations—The Heiress exemplifies the Hollywood adaptation at its best. Catherine Sloper (Olivia de Havilland, in a virtuosic and heartbreaking turn) is the unwed daughter of a widowed father (a loving yet painfully condescending Ralph Richardson), who falls wildly in love with man her father does not approve of. Wyler sees the nuanced and complex Catherine incur the scars of disappointment, as she transforms from anxiety ridden and hopeful to bitter and broken, in what may be the pinnacle of pre-method, old Hollywood acting. Forget Breaking Bad, this is the real deal—Walter White doesn’t have an inch on Catherine Sloper.

Dir. William Wyler, 1949, 35mm, 115 min.

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