Belladonna of Sadness (5/24)

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5/24 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Jonathan Lethem presents "Bigger Than Life"

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5/25 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

New York Times best-selling author and MacArthur fellow Jonathan Lethem joins us to present Nicholas Ray’s Bigger Than Life. A family drama with a Hitchcockian streak, Bigger Than Life is an Eisenhower-era paranoia-laden CinemaScope masterpiece, based on a piece in the New Yorker authored by medical writer Berton Roueché. Careening between melodrama, sci-fi, and horror — Lethem calls the film “Douglas Sirk meets Oliver Sacks” — this poignant and precise vision of ‘50s American life and the fantasy/nightmare of the nuclear family plays like speculative fiction, with medical experiments acting as a harbinger for wild fears of fascism, state power, and class shame. Ray expertly teases out the precariousness inherent in the explicit conventionality of James Mason, Barbara Rush, and Walter Matthau’s characters — a school teacher, his wife, and his best friend, respectively. The group who, as Lethem notes, “rest uneasily on their bed of normality,” feel their quotidian lives violently upended in a Shining-esque trip down a post-WWII Americana rabbit hole.

The film will be followed by a conversation with Lethem.

Dir. Nicholas Ray, 1956, DCP, 95 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Eyes of Fire

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5/25 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

The woods of early American settlers were a territory of savage darkness:the home of the devil and mysteriously foreboding. Like the untamed American continent itself, the woods were an unknowable place,and still remain ripe for projections of fantasy and horror (see: The Witch). Surrealist photographer (and first time filmmaker) Avery Crounse’s Eyes of Fire seizes the psychology of these early settlers in this poor-man’s-punk take on the supernatural battle between good and evil, rife with impressively fantastical set pieces—from trees with faces and a mysterious naked forest-dwelling sect to rains of skulls and bones—all swung on a shoestring budget. ALL OF THEM WITCHES proudly resurrects this fierce, DIY horror flick, excavated from several realms beyond the consciousness of even the committed cult-film lover, for your late-night enjoyment.

Dir. Avery Crounse, 1983, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Private Rental (7:00pm - 12:00am)

5/26 - 7PM

For this timeslot, we will not be open to the public, as some lucky patron has rented our theater — both supporting the Cinefamily and using the beautiful Silent Movie Theatre for their own event. The theater can be yours, too! Weddings, premieres of your film with an on-site afterparty, business-related entertaining, great birthdays, bar or bat mitzvahs, or any other kind of celebration you can imagine — it’s better at the movies. For more information, email “events@cinefamily.org”

Belladonna of Sadness (5/26)

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5/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/26)

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5/26 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

A Touch of Zen (5/27)

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5/27 - 7PM
$12/free for members

After a long run at Shaw Brothers studio on the mainland, King Hu left for Taiwan and crafted the masterpiece Dragon Inn, which led to the opportunity to tackle his most ambitious project by far: A Touch of Zen — a tale of a young artist who falls for a roving warrior committed to avenging the death of her father at the hands of the Imperial agents of the Ming dynasty.

An oddity in the Wuxia canon, and considered to be the film that legitimized beloved martial arts-driven Chinese genre films as “art”, King Hu packs in visual experimentation — with balletic and quixotic battles sequences, transcendental nature scenes, and detective stories giving way to supernatural indulgence, pacifist monks ultimately kicking ass when it’s time to throw down, and loving homage to the westerns of Anthony Mann — in this astonishing 14th Century epic, finally given its due with a stunning 4K restoration.

Dir. King Hu, 1971, DCP Restoration, 200 min.

Watch the trailer!

Off-site @ the Bob Baker Marionette Theater: Pippi In the South Seas

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5/27 - 8PM
$15/free for members and kids under 2

Hosted by DJ Lance Rock of Yo Gabba Gabba! With marionette opening act!

She’s been hiding for years, but she hasn’t forgotten about you. Once an inspiration to adventurous kids across the globe, and once a staple of local weekend television (KTLA Channel 5, you old devil), Pippi Longstocking was the redhead on the move. She lived at Villa Villekulla with her horse and monkey — but she was a citizen of the world, deftly guiding the hands of her neighbors Tommy and Annika through the shining prism of a fearless childhood.

Spun from the brilliant mind of author Astrid Lindgren and immortalized onscreen by the eternally cute Inger Nilsson, Pippi continues to bring a kaleidoscope of joy to our collective heart, no matter what ages we might be. Once she’s with you, she’s with you always — and this ultra-rare 16mm presentation of PIPPI IN THE SOUTH SEAS (1970) gives Los Angeles a chance to relive the magic of this heart-soaring, nonconformist creation.

Dir. Olle Hellbom, 1970, 16mm, 86 min.

Blue Velvet (5/27)

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5/27 - 11PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Off-site @ the Bob Baker Marionette Theater: Pippi In the South Seas

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5/28 - 2:30PM
$15/free for members and kids under 2

Hosted by DJ Lance Rock of Yo Gabba Gabba! With marionette opening act!

She’s been hiding for years, but she hasn’t forgotten about you. Once an inspiration to adventurous kids across the globe, and once a staple of local weekend television (KTLA Channel 5, you old devil), Pippi Longstocking was the redhead on the move. She lived at Villa Villekulla with her horse and monkey — but she was a citizen of the world, deftly guiding the hands of her neighbors Tommy and Annika through the shining prism of a fearless childhood.

Spun from the brilliant mind of author Astrid Lindgren and immortalized onscreen by the eternally cute Inger Nilsson, Pippi continues to bring a kaleidoscope of joy to our collective heart, no matter what ages we might be. Once she’s with you, she’s with you always — and this ultra-rare 16mm presentation of PIPPI IN THE SOUTH SEAS (1970) gives Los Angeles a chance to relive the magic of this heart-soaring, nonconformist creation.

Dir. Olle Hellbom, 1970, 16mm, 86 min.

Belladonna of Sadness (5/28)

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5/28 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Blue Velvet (5/28)

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5/28 - 8:15PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Teen Witch & The Worst Witch Double Feature!

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5/28 - 11PM
$14/free for members

Growing up is hard for girls. You’ve got to deal with boys, boobs, bratty brothers, and Brad, the hunky football star who has no idea you’re alive! Luckily, the Cinefamily’s got a cure for your angst in the form of a Worst Witch x Teen Witch double feature! This potion of potent pubescence is one part made-for-TV Disney nostalgia, one part Salem bildungsroman, two minutes of adorably uncomfortable ‘80s rap, and all the eye o’ newts we could find, brewed in one seething cauldron of adolescent witchiness!

Louise’s life is changed when her latent magical powers become apparent on her sixteenth birthday. Once an uber-nerd, our new Teen Witch uses her gifts for love, homework, and popularity, only to realize that her sorcery comes with serious complications. A cotton-candy comedy packed with teased-out neon fashion and an earworm’s worth of original songs (you’re gonna have to dig deep to Top That!), Teen Witch is a spellbinding staple brought to life by a cast with supernatural appeal: the sexy duo of Robyn Lively and Dan Gauthier, Near Dark’s Joshua John Miller and Poltergeist’s Zelda Rubinstein.

Dir. Dorian Walker, 1989, 35mm, 94 min.

Speaking of potions both innocuous and iniquitous, who could forget 1986′s Disney Channel original, The Worst Witch? We follow the clumsy Mildred (Fairuza Balk, before her turn as The Craft‘s nefarious Nancy) in her efforts at Ms. Cackle’s International Academy for Witches. Between terror tag, broomstick lessons, and potions class, Mildred’s school year is turning out to be abracadismal—if only she believed in herself! Featuring a musical showstopper from the Grand Wizard (who else but Tim Curry himself), The Worst Witch is where Halloween kitsch meets girl power, where a girl (or ghoul) like Mildred can realize that no matter her doubts, “Once in a purple moon, there is a special young witch who shines above the rest!”

Dir. Robert Young, 1986, Digital presentation, 70 min.

Watch the trailer!

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - The Green Slime

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5/29 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by warnerarchive_300_90

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!
Join us at noon for libations on the patio!

“Nothing ever happens here,” moans a grumpy space technician. Suddenly, right on cue, an asteroid teeming with extraterrestrial green goo is on a collision course with Earth! What follows is a delectable smorgasbord of charmingly constructed space station miniatures, non-sequiturs delivered with the stiffest of lips, and special effects so cheap they wouldn’t even sell off of a clearance rack. In simpler terms: It’s B-movie heaven. Watch as crew members of Gamma 3 get picked off one-by-one, with each death more bizarrely gory than the next. Defying logic at every turn (why is sentient, chiseled jaw Commander Jack Rankin’s first battle instinct always to throw things at the aliens, including his laser gun?), The Green Slime is a delirious, self-serious, silly alien creature feature of the highest order. Come for the aliens with bloodshot, perma-stoned eyes; stay for the flubbed line readings and psych-rock theme song.

Dir. Kinji Fukasaku, 1968, 35mm (Courtesy of BFI), 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

A Touch of Zen (5/29)

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5/29 - 4PM
$12/free for members

After a long run at Shaw Brothers studio on the mainland, King Hu left for Taiwan and crafted the masterpiece Dragon Inn, which led to the opportunity to tackle his most ambitious project by far: A Touch of Zen — a tale of a young artist who falls for a roving warrior committed to avenging the death of her father at the hands of the Imperial agents of the Ming dynasty.

An oddity in the Wuxia canon, and considered to be the film that legitimized beloved martial arts-driven Chinese genre films as “art”, King Hu packs in visual experimentation — with balletic and quixotic battles sequences, transcendental nature scenes, and detective stories giving way to supernatural indulgence, pacifist monks ultimately kicking ass when it’s time to throw down, and loving homage to the westerns of Anthony Mann — in this astonishing 14th Century epic, finally given its due with a stunning 4K restoration.

Dir. King Hu, 1971, DCP Restoration, 200 min.

Watch the trailer!

Blue Velvet (5/29)

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5/29 - 8:30PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Five Minutes Game: 2016 Edition

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5/30 - 5PM
$12/ free for members

Summer’s around the corner, and you know how we here at the theater love two things in tandem: busting out the patio grill, and The Five Minutes Game. What’s all this about a game, you ask? We’re firm believers in “every movie is interesting for at least its first five minutes,” those fascinating moments when you’re still entering the new world a film presents you, and trying to figure out what the hell’s going on. We’ll choose fifteen movies you’ve likely never seen before (with most of them still unavailable on DVD), line ‘em up and only show you the first five minutes of each (excluding the opening credits). Then you, the audience, will vote on which film to watch in its entirety. So bring something to cook on our grill and let’s get started!

5:00-6:30PM – The Five Minutes Game!
6:30-7:30PM – we tally the votes and BBQ on the patio!
7:30-9:00PM – we watch the winning film!

Blue Velvet (5/30)

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5/30 - 11PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Blue Velvet (5/31)

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5/31 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Blue Velvet (5/31)

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5/31 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Lost & Found Film Club - Witches

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6/1 - 7:30PM
$10/free for members

We’re flying to the fringes of 16mm filmmaking to conjure a program of experimental shorts about witches and those who love them. Witchcraft has been subject to a wide variety of portrayals in short film history, from Maya Deren’s ethereal occult dreamscapes in Witch’s Cradle to the cackling cartoons of spider-webbed educational films. This moody brew features the best of both worlds! Fall under the spell of Stan Brakhage’s Cat’s Cradle, see Barbara Hammer’s Women’s Rites (shot on witches land in Northern CA), then sample the cooking of a suburban witch who specializes in trippy “magic pancakes.” Playing with animation, pixelation, time-lapse, and found footage as only the alchemical magic of film can, this is an acetate incantation for the cloak and crystal set. This supernatural 16mm spell will be cast for only one eerie eve, so transmogrify your coven’s calendar accordingly.

Featuring 16mm prints courtesy of Canyon Cinema, Filmmaker’s Co-op, Academy Film Archvie and A/V Geeks!

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Blue Velvet (6/1)

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6/1 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Viy

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6/2 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Print Courtesy of the Academy Film Archive

Based on the Nikolai Gogol novel of the same name (which also served as inspiration for none other than Mario Bava’s Black Sunday), and considered to be the first Soviet-era horror film released in the USSR, Viy is the hidden gem of our ALL OF THEM WITCHES series. Criminally underseen and unlike anything that came before it, Viy throws you into rural medieval Russia, with a Goya-esque cast of grotesque bit-players, ingenious special effects, and dizzying, avant-garde cinematography. With tantalizing choreography that’ll keep you on the edge of your seat, the titular Viy (loosely translated as the Devil’s emissary) engulfs the film in all her ashen, earthy, sinister glory! Perfect for both seasoned and green lovers of all things occult, don’t miss a rare 35mm presentation of this Russian masterpiece.

Dir. Georgi Kropachyov, Konstantin Yershov, 1967, 35 mm, 78 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Blue Velvet (6/2)

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6/2 - 10PM
$12/free for members

An earthquake of a movie when it was released, Blue Velvet begins as a collage of a Mr. Rogers-worthy suburban neighborhood—with Crayola colored roses and white picket fences—quaint until a moldy severed ear is discovered in a local park and the film dives down a bizarro rabbit hole. With a cute Hardy Boys-esque patina, and steeped in the lethal eroticism of a neo-noir, Lynch’s grotesque small town mystery articulated his unique filmmaking taxonomy with a host of now-legendary characters and moments — like Dennis Hopper (in a career reviving performance) as depraved gang-leader Frank Booth, huffing from his gas mask to Roy Orbison songs, and the enigmatic, masochistic Dorothy Vallens (Rossellini) hanging her curly-haired head back in Jeffery (Kyle McLaughlin)’s naked arms, yearning for love. No less hideous or thrilling today than it was at the time of its explosive release 30 years ago, the newly restored Blue Velvet is a crime, a lie, an addiction, a caress, and all the time we are together… in dreams.

Dir. David Lynch, 1986, DCP Restoration, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

An Evening with Amber Tozer

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6/3 - 7:30PM
$12/ free for members

With her first drink at the tender age of seven, stand-up comedian Amber Tozer began a long and tough battle with alcoholism. Sober Stick Figure, her new memoir, tells this story—the harsh realities of being raised by alcoholic parents, the stubborn denial she felt—all the way up to her eventual recovery, traumas deftly communicated by benevolent and childlike stick figures. Amber will read from the book alongside projections of her illustrations, and a very special preview of TRENT, Dino Stamatopoulos’s musical graphic novel. Rare short films from Stamatopoulos and Andy Dick’s days as a comedy duo and a performance by acapella group The Tuesdays will round out the evening!

Advance copies of Sober Stick Figure will be available for purchase.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Friday Night Frights - Black Sunday

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6/3 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

The first official film by Italian horror maestro Mario Bava, Black Sunday remains one of the cornerstones of both Italian and Gothic horror, more than 50 years after its 1960 release. Considered wildly graphic for its day, the stylish and deeply unsettling film concerns the curse of a centuries old witch (played with voluptuous intensity in an icon-defining performance from Barbara Steele) who returns from the grave to wreak vengeance on the family whose ancestors burnt her at the stake hundreds of years prior. Dripping with atmosphere, Bava imbues every frame with an artistry that set the high standard for Italian horror, the spark fanned into flames by future genre masters like Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci. More visually impressive and shocking than many of its classic horror contemporaries, Black Sunday is a vital film that demands to be seen on the big screen

Dir. Mario Bava, 1960, 35mm, 87 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ABD's Saturday Morning Cartoons: Space and Science

pinky-en-brain
6/4 - 11AM
$10/ free for members & children under 14

This month Saturday Morning Cartoons counts down and blasts off for one our most popular (and favorite) themes… Space and Science! We’ll watch tales of planetary conquest, scientific discovery, and flying saucers—all space-aged to perfection. Expect adventures of the mind with Pinky and the Brain, Dexter’s Lab, Looney Tunes, and They Might Be Giants.

Pajamas not mandatory, but encouraged. Complimentary cereal bar with a rotation of the best sugary cereals on the market (featuring our monthly mix) and a cash bar for the grown ups who want their sugar delivered in the form of a mimosa.

The Cassandra Cat + Meow Mix

cassandras-cat
6/4 - 8PM
$12/ free for members

The scene: a small Czech village. The set-up: a travelling circus arrives in town, with a cat wearing sunglasses in tow. You shouldn’t really need any more information to understand the appeal of The Cassandra Cat (except perhaps a picture of the cat, named Mokol), which won two major awards at Cannes upon its release in 1963. Director Vojtech Jasny blew Czech children’s minds with the titular feline, whose unfettered gaze bathes people in psychedelic hues that reflect their inner spirit. This film’s charms are many, from its unprecedented use of color, to its folksy small-town humor, and experimental take on the fable. It’s a special pleasure to show a gorgeous 35mm print of this rarely-screened treasure of Czech New Wave on the big screen.

The film will be accompanied by a special “Meow Mix,” a Cinefamily original mix of cat videos, culled from the depths of this oh-so-expansive field by our valiant, feline-loving programmers.

Dir Vojtech Jasny, 1963, 35mm, 91 min.

Belladonna of Sadness (6/4)

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6/4 - 11:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Emma Straub presents "The Squid and the Whale"

squidandthewhale
6/5 - 7:30PM
$15/ free for members

New York Times best-selling author Emma Straub joins us to present Noah Baumbach’s The Squid and the Whale. In ‘80s Brooklyn, when a couple of infrequently publishing writers could live in a spacious Park Slope brownstone with their two kids, the self-absorbed duo announce plans to separate, upending the lives of their children. The acerbic bunch, parents included, fail to handle the adjustment well, but the characters are so monstrous—save perhaps for the younger son, a self-proclaimed philistine—that it seems implausible that they were even marginally more loving prior to the separation. Drawing out painfully harsh moments between family members with dark humor and wry wit, Baumbach—the child of two writers—hones in on the inescapable drama of the nuclear family, a subject also near and dear to Straub’s work. Watch closely, and you might catch a glimpse of Emma in the film…

The film will be followed by a conversation with Emma and copies of her new book, Modern Lovers, will be available for purchase.

Dir Noah Baumbach, 2005, 35mm, 81 min.

DOUG BENSON MOVIE INTERRUPTION: Mission: Impossible III

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6/6 - 7:30PM
$12/ free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.

Dir J.J. Abrams, 2006, 35mm, 126 min.

Belladonna of Sadness (6/6)

belladonna1_480_309
6/6 - 11:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: OCCULT LA - Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages w/ a live score by WHITE MAGIC (Encore!)

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6/7 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Presented by Jodi Wille (Director of The Source Family)

Live score by WHITE MAGIC with special guests Rococo Jet (Nora Keyes + Jimi Cabeza de Vaca) & Carisa Bianca Mellad!

Conjured in an obsessive fever dream by one of the boldest auteurs of the era (with the highest budget of any Swedish silent) Haxan is a taboo-busting, genre-bending, gorgeously-filmed exploration of witch hysteria during the Inquisition. Its release was so controversial that 8,000 Catholic women protested outside a single theater in France, and UK reviewers demanded that theaters “take it off the screen immediately!” Nearly 100 years later, Haxan’s vivid and haunting imagery is still searingly potent and the film still polarizing–considered by some a macabre exploitation film and by others an unflinching, authentic portrayal of the horrors wrought in the name of God during one of the most devastating eras of human history.

LA-based WHITE MAGIC (Mira Bilotte) will provide a live score to the film. Afterwards, join us on the patio to celebrate White Magic’s new record, “I’m Hiding My Nightingale,” amidst a pop-up exhibition of occult-themed posters and art from Century Guild.

Dir. Benjamin Christensen, 1922, Digital presentation, 87 min.

Belladonna of Sadness (6/7)

belladonna4_480_309
6/7 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ADULT SWIM PRESENTS: DECKERCON ‘16

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6/8 - 7:30PM
Free (first-come, first-served)

Dive into the world of Decker with “Deckercon 2016!” Join us as we screen new episodes of Decker featuring creator/star Tim Heidecker and Gregg Turkington. It’ll be a high-octane night of specially trained, CIA agents battling the harshest evils to ever threaten America. With gifts for all, and a Q&A with the cast/creators, you’ll gain top level access to a world of spies and intrigue.

Belladonna of Sadness (6/8)

belladonna5_480_309
6/8 - 11PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

A BAND AND A MOVIE: Radio On + Ted Leo

Radio-On-Christopher-Petit
6/9 - 7:30PM
$20

Ted Leo live! Co-presented by FYF!

Originally rising to fame in the New York hardcore scene of the late ‘80s, and a staple of East Coast independent music since the early ‘90s, Ted Leo has thrown himself into punk and folk, soul and hardcore, the traditional and experimental. With songwriting as infectious and calculated as that of Brit rock legends the Kinks, and rhythms fueled by the anthemic energy reminiscent of bands like the Who and the Clash, Leo has performed in many a context. This jack of all trades and master of several—of Citizen’s Arrest, Animal Crackers, Chisel, Spinanes, The Sin Eaters, The Pharmacists, The Both—brings us his musical stylings and Christopher Petit’s 1979 drop-dead cool Radio On.

One of the only true English road movies, and definitely the hippest, the rarely seen Radio On is a highway film built around its eclectic yet à la mode late ‘70s soundtrack, featuring the likes of Kraftwerk, David Bowie, and Robert Fripp. Shot in contrasty black and white by Martin Schäfer (assistant cameraman to Wim Wenders, who served as producer) the camera surveys the highway and Modernist architecture through the wide and cinematic windshield. In the words of Ted Leo, it’s “punk-noir mystery Candide through the lens of England’s political and social upheavals of the late 70s. Very in my lane.”

Dir Christopher Petit, 1979, 35mm (courtesy of BFI), 104 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (6/9)

belladonna3_480_309
6/9 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Harlan County, USA w/ Barbara Kopple in person!

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6/10 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

With live folk music performance from David Morris and his son Jack Morris!

Harlan County USA chronicles a fiercely contested labor battle in Kentucky during the early 1970s. After the company Duke Power refuses to sign a standard union contract, miners and their families take to the picket lines hoping to force better wages and working conditions. The standoff intensifies as strikebreakers use intimidation tactics and state troopers provide safe passage for replacement “scabs” in support of the corporation. During one tense confrontation, a man points a gun at the camera and we hear a woman scream, “Don’t shoot!”

That’s the voice of Barbara Kopple, making her directorial debut. Having gained experience working with documentary pioneers Albert and David Maysles and on the anti-war film Winter Soldier, Kopple found a way to apply cinema-verité to a cause for which she was willing to risk her life. She and her crew lived among the miners for thirteen months when there was no other media coverage. Knowing that the attention helped to suppress violence, they would sometimes bring their 16mm cameras and pretend to shoot even when they couldn’t afford film. (via TIFF)

Dir. Barbara Kopple, 1976, 35 mm, 104 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Friday Night Frights - The Witches

THE WITCHES (BR1990) ANGELICA HUSTON
6/10 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

In what may be the strangest family flick collaboration on record, British auteur Nicolas Roeg (Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell To Earth, Bad Timing) teamed up with Jim Henson to adapt a book by the bizarre and beloved author of children’s fiction, Roald Dahl (The BFG, Matilda, James and the Giant Peach). The result—a darkly comedic and, frankly, kinda disturbing fairy tale that Dahl himself declared “utterly appalling”—is an eccentric masterwork that’s been both delighting and destroying kids of all ages for more than twenty years. It’s pure kindertrauma when a coven of witches try to rid Britain of youngsters by turning them into teeny-tiny, fuzzy four-legged mice. Fiendishly funny and devilishly magical, this fantastical nightmare even supplies a deliriously wicked, over-the-top turn from Angelica Huston and imaginative mouse-a-tronic puppetry from Henson’s creature shop… entertainment perfect for The Witching Hour!

Dir. Nicholas Roeg, 1990, 35mm, 92 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

THE SILENT TREATMENT: The Four Feathers

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6/11 - 2PM
$12/free for members

As this 35mm print contains the original music & effects track from 1929, The Four Feathers will NOT feature a live score.

By 1929, the talkies had taken off, and box offices were none-the-friendlier to silent films. Despite the circumstances, The Four Feathers–which debuted with music and sound effects only–was a hit; in fact, it was one of the last silent box office hits ever. Directed by the men who would go on to make King Kong, and based on the 1902 A.E.W. Mason novel of the same name, The Four Feathers follows a man who is branded a coward with the titular four white feathers, and subsequently endeavors to disprove the claim. Extravagantly shot partially on location in Africa, and decked out with the best cast Paramount could buy (Fay Wray as the lead), The Four Feathers is assuredly Hollywood history.

Dir. Merian C. Cooper, Lothar Mendes & Ernest B. Schoedsack, 1929, 35mm (Courtesy of Universal), 80 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Miss Sharon Jones! w/ Barbara Kopple in person!

USA - MUSIC - Sharon Jones
6/11 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Sharon Jones is a true soul survivor. She’s been called “the female James Brown” for the energy she brings to the stage backed by her band The Dap-Kings. That energy is the fuel for a study of contrasts in Miss Sharon Jones!, as we follow her on an emotional journey as she goes through chemotherapy and struggles to mount a comeback show at New York’s Beacon Theater. This story finds its perfect match in director Barbara Kopple, another soulful talent and two-time Oscar winner for Harlan County, USA and American Dream, whose career also includes studies of performers in Wild Man Blues and Shut Up and Sing! Kopple’s supreme skill at observational filmmaking shines through as she captures the highs and lows of Jones’ efforts to battle cancer and keep her band together. We watch as the band completes its 2014 album Give the People What They Want. By the end of this film, what you’ll want is more Sharon Jones. (via Doc NYC)

Dir. Barbara Kopple, 2015, DCP, 93 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: The Devils (35mm!)

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6/11 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Exploding at the seams with anti-puritanical flamboyance, Ken Russell’s assuredly-directed The Devils is like a darkly humorous journey into a mind on the brink of insanity. With sumptuous set design by Derek Jarman (Jubilee, Sebastiane), and celestial and melodramatic costuming by Shirley Russell, the film tells the tale of a 17th-century priest (Oliver Reed in his most arresting performance) accused of witchcraft by Sister Jeanne (a maddeningly creepy Vanessa Redgrave), a nun firmly in the grips of erotic hysteria.

Dir. Ken Russell, 1971, 35mm , 112 min.

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - The War of the Worlds

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6/12 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!
Join us at noon for libations on the patio!

Byron Haskin’s 1953 War of the Worlds (adapted from the story by H.G. Wells) lives and breathes Technicolor, determined to play out like a “realistic” alien invasion. Ricocheting between news reel narration highlighting the effects of the attack worldwide, and the still-fresh memories of WW2 and the atomic bomb — via shockingly violent battle sequences — Worlds is the quintessential marriage of Technicolor and sci-fi. A grab bag loaded with square dancing, instantaneous cremation, delightfully innovative special effects, and a handful of oddly chilling, one-eyed (three-lensed), anemic, seemingly merciless invaders, it’s a shockingly eerie and unsettling oddity of ‘50s sci-fi, equal parts intelligent and goofy. With heaping spoonfuls of scientific explanation delivered by a hunky leading man, we promise this gem’s eye-popping color will melt your puny humanoid brain.

Dir. Byron Haskin, 1953, 35mm, 85 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Rosemary's Baby

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6/12 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

You thought bearing your first child would be difficult? Try harboring Satan’s spawn in your womb. Every female’s paranoia about pregnancy is confronted both satirically and solemnly in Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, the filmmaker’s first major stateside effort. Mia Farrow’s Omaha-born Rosemary, burdened by a lifetime of Catholic guilt and the narcissism of her actor husband Guy (an insipidly villainous John Cassavetes), finds her ultimate goal of motherhood foisted upon her, the conception curiously timed to increased visits from a septuagenarian couple, the Castavets (Sidney Blackmer and the ever-sublime Ruth Gordon). If the chanting heard through the apartment walls in the storied Bramford building they call home and the dreams too vivid to be apparitions could once be cast off, the wrath of the black magick brought upon Ro can no longer be ignored as gestation morphs into a nightmare incarnate. Join us as we “Hail, Satan!” in a rousing toast to Upper West Side, high society witchcraft in what we consider one of the greatest American horror films ever made.

Dir. Roman Polanski, 1968, 35mm, 136 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Raiders! Doc + Raiders of the Lost Ark Adaptation Double Feature (w/ Chris Strompolos, Eric Zala and director Jeremy Coon in person!)

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6/12 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation

In 1982, Eric Zala, Jayson Lamb and Chris Strompolos began filming a shot-for-shot remake of Raiders of the Lost Ark. They were twelve years old. Six years later, the film was in the can. Twenty-four years later still, The Cinefamily brings you Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation, along with co-directors Eric Zala and Chris Strompolos in person to tell the amazing story of this legendary movie. No other film experience will prepare you for this. This trio of filmmakers showed more tenacity, originality, heart, courage and skill than ten indie production teams put together, and all before puberty! We promise The Adaptation is like no other film you have ever seen — except, of course, Raiders of the Lost Ark!

Dir. Eric Zala, 1989, Digital Presentation, 100 min.

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made w/ Chris Strompolos, Eric Zala and director Jeremy Coon in person!

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: The Devils (35mm!)

thedevils3_480_309
6/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Exploding at the seams with anti-puritanical flamboyance, Ken Russell’s assuredly-directed The Devils is like a darkly humorous journey into a mind on the brink of insanity. With sumptuous set design by Derek Jarman (Jubilee, Sebastiane), and celestial and melodramatic costuming by Shirley Russell, the film tells the tale of a 17th-century priest (Oliver Reed in his most arresting performance) accused of witchcraft by Sister Jeanne (a maddeningly creepy Vanessa Redgrave), a nun firmly in the grips of erotic hysteria.

Dir. Ken Russell, 1971, 35mm , 112 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Rosemary's Baby

rosemarysbb1_480_309
6/13 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

You thought bearing your first child would be difficult? Try harboring Satan’s spawn in your womb. Every female’s paranoia about pregnancy is confronted both satirically and solemnly in Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, the filmmaker’s first major stateside effort. Mia Farrow’s Omaha-born Rosemary, burdened by a lifetime of Catholic guilt and the narcissism of her actor husband Guy (an insipidly villainous John Cassavetes), finds her ultimate goal of motherhood foisted upon her, the conception curiously timed to increased visits from a septuagenarian couple, the Castavets (Sidney Blackmer and the ever-sublime Ruth Gordon). If the chanting heard through the apartment walls in the storied Bramford building they call home and the dreams too vivid to be apparitions could once be cast off, the wrath of the black magick brought upon Ro can no longer be ignored as gestation morphs into a nightmare incarnate. Join us as we “Hail, Satan!” in a rousing toast to Upper West Side, high society witchcraft in what we consider one of the greatest American horror films ever made.

Dir. Roman Polanski, 1968, 35mm, 136 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: The Devils (35mm!)

thedevils1_480_309
6/14 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Exploding at the seams with anti-puritanical flamboyance, Ken Russell’s assuredly-directed The Devils is like a darkly humorous journey into a mind on the brink of insanity. With sumptuous set design by Derek Jarman (Jubilee, Sebastiane), and celestial and melodramatic costuming by Shirley Russell, the film tells the tale of a 17th-century priest (Oliver Reed in his most arresting performance) accused of witchcraft by Sister Jeanne (a maddeningly creepy Vanessa Redgrave), a nun firmly in the grips of erotic hysteria.

Dir. Ken Russell, 1971, 35mm , 112 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Rosemary's Baby

rosemarysbb2_480_309
6/14 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

You thought bearing your first child would be difficult? Try harboring Satan’s spawn in your womb. Every female’s paranoia about pregnancy is confronted both satirically and solemnly in Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby, the filmmaker’s first major stateside effort. Mia Farrow’s Omaha-born Rosemary, burdened by a lifetime of Catholic guilt and the narcissism of her actor husband Guy (an insipidly villainous John Cassavetes), finds her ultimate goal of motherhood foisted upon her, the conception curiously timed to increased visits from a septuagenarian couple, the Castavets (Sidney Blackmer and the ever-sublime Ruth Gordon). If the chanting heard through the apartment walls in the storied Bramford building they call home and the dreams too vivid to be apparitions could once be cast off, the wrath of the black magick brought upon Ro can no longer be ignored as gestation morphs into a nightmare incarnate. Join us as we “Hail, Satan!” in a rousing toast to Upper West Side, high society witchcraft in what we consider one of the greatest American horror films ever made.

Dir. Roman Polanski, 1968, 35mm, 136 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/17)

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6/17 - 10PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Friday Night Frights - The Craft

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6/17 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…

Dir. Andrew Fleming, 1996, 35mm, 101 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/18)

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6/18 - 5PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/18)

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6/18 - 8PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

Thomas Middleditch presents The Blood of Heroes

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6/18 - 10:30PM
$14/ free for members

The 1989 post-apocalyptic The Blood Of Heroes may technically be a “B-movie,” but Thomas Middleditch gives it a resounding “A.” Life is cheap—especially in the above-ground wastelands—and, for those brave enough to compete, the gladiator-style bloodsport known as “Jugging” is often the only way out. But those are just the minor leagues, and if you’re brave enough—or just plain foolish—you might get a chance to play in an “outreach” game hosted by any of The Nine Cities ruled by the bourgeois elite, notorious for leaving juggs dead or crippled beyond repair on the field. Will our motley crew of Dog Town misfits make it past 100 Stone, or will they simply hope to make it out alive? Featuring familiar faces like Rutger Hauer, Vincent D’Onofrio, Delroy Lindo, and Joan Chen, director David Peoples has concocted a winning mash-up of sports film with Mad Max-style dystopia. Catch this flick, presented by its biggest fan, Thomas Middleditch!

Dir David Peoples, 1989, 35mm, 90 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Hangover Matinees - Bell, Book and Candle

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6/19 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!
Join us on the patio at noon for libations on the patio!

Based on a play inspired by Rene Clair’s I Married A Witch, Bell, Book and Candle is the too-oft forgotten showcase of the chemistry between Jimmy Stewart and Kim Novak (Vertigo was released the same year). An absolutely delightful romance of the highest order, with a healthy dose of creep seeping into the periphery, it’s a classic tale of a love spell gone wrong: Kim Novak plays a seductive art dealer who decides her neighbor’s fiancé just isn’t good enough for him, casts a spell to get what she wants, and accidentally falls in love.

Sumptuously lensed in a bewitching palette of blue, lavender, and red by none other than James Wong Howe (Indiscretion of an American Wife, Sweet Smell of Success) and capturing Greenwich Village streets at dawn and twilight, this sole Hangover Matinee entry in our ALL OF THEM WITCHES series presents a singular and uncannily practical representation of a cat’s point of view. With a lovably goofy performance from Jack Lemmon as a warlock, and Jean Louis’ inimitable costumes, Bell Book and Candle is the greatest Christmas witch film you didn’t even realize you were missing.

Dir. Richard Quine, 1958, DCP, 106 min.

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/19)

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6/19 - 4:45PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/21)

raiders3_480_309
6/21 - 10PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/22)

raiders4_480_309
6/22 - 10PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

Raiders!: The Story of the Greatest Fan Film Ever Made (6/23)

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6/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

When three pre-teens set out to shoot a veracious remake of Spielberg’s Raiders of the Lost Ark one summer in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, they initiated their quest with the naivety of youthful ambition. Seven years and countless fights, growth spurts and voice changes later, the team had completed every scene except one: the iconic moment when Indiana fends off a buffed-out Nazi while dipping and dodging whirring airplane propellers. Featuring interviews with John Rhys-Davies (“Asps, very dangerous—you go first.”) and filmmaker Eli Roth, Raiders! is the Burden of Dreams for the Ain’t It Cool News set, proving that one group of inspired kids might unexpectedly become inspiration.

Dir. Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, 2015, DCP, 104 min.

Watch the trailer!

VideoSonics: L.A. Takedown VS The Hitcher

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6/23 - 10PM
$14/ Free for members

L.A. Takedown—no, not the 1989 Michael Mann thriller—is a music project led by Aaron M. Olson. Cinematically minded—the group’s recent release was a 42-minute single track set to a super edit of real-time sunset footage shot in and around LA, Ventura, Wonder Valley, Birch Bay, WA, and Belize—the group is a natural choice for VideoSonics, our forward-thinking iteration of the live score phenomenon.

The group’s seven musicians—all cinephiles—could have deliberated endlessly when choosing a film due for some visual/sonic experiments, yet they found common ground with The Hitcher: “A devastating and concise bullet, a semi-spectral killing machine, sun bleached desert-scapes, the annihilation of swathes of highway patrolmen, bifurcation via semi-truck… The film is an energetic and brutal potpourri of genre magnificence that turns a cat-and-mouse chase into an existential nightmare” (Matt Hewitt, UCLA Film & TV Archive).

Dir Robert Harmon, 1986.

The Dying Swan (w/ live score by Jozef van Wissem)

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6/24 - 7:30PM
$18/ free for members

Avant-garde composer and baroque lutenist Jozef van Wissem pairs his uniquely hypnotic melodies with Yevgeni Bauer’s 1917 Russian silent film, The Dying Swan, for a special live score. In the film—an artifact of ballet mythology—Gizella (based on Théophile Gaultier’s Giselle, arguably the most famous Romantic ballet character of all time) is faced with the time-honored dilemma: whether to devote oneself fully to art or life. No stranger to the marriage of cinema and music, van Wissem brings his wide background to this special live score: he has released more than ten albums, including several soundtracks such as the the score for Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive, which won the award for best score at Cannes in 2013. Van Wissem—who regularly plays live with Jarmusch, Tilda Swinton, and Zola Jesus—has fascinated audiences with his one-of-a-kind, custom baroque lute, as at-home at rock shows as at formal concerts; next up: at Cinefamily!

Dir Yevgeni Bauer, 1917, digital presentation, 49 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Friday Night Frights - Suspiria

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6/24 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…

Dir. Dario Argento, 1977, 35mm, 100 min.

The Dying Swan (w/ live score by Jozef van Wissem)

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6/25 - 7:30PM
$18/ free for members

Avant-garde composer and baroque lutenist Jozef van Wissem pairs his uniquely hypnotic melodies with Yevgeni Bauer’s 1917 Russian silent film, The Dying Swan, for a special live score. In the film—an artifact of ballet mythology—Gizella (based on Théophile Gaultier’s Giselle, arguably the most famous Romantic ballet character of all time) is faced with the time-honored dilemma: whether to devote oneself fully to art or life. No stranger to the marriage of cinema and music, van Wissem brings his wide background to this special live score: he has released more than ten albums, including several soundtracks such as the the score for Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alive, which won the award for best score at Cannes in 2013. Van Wissem—who regularly plays live with Jarmusch, Tilda Swinton, and Zola Jesus—has fascinated audiences with his one-of-a-kind, custom baroque lute, as at-home at rock shows as at formal concerts; next up: at Cinefamily!

Dir Yevgeni Bauer, 1917, digital presentation, 49 min.

Black Girl (new restoration!)

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6/30 - 7:30PM
$12/ free for members

Co-presented by Radio Afrique + followed by DJ sets by Radio Afrique

The historic first feature film made in Africa by a black African director, Ousmane Sembène’s Black Girl may be celebrating it’s 50th anniversary this year, but it’s no less trenchant and eloquent than it was upon its 1966 arrival. A sharp character study in the vein of Italian neorealism, and an incisive portrait of French-Senegalese postcolonial relations, Black Girl follows a young girl named Diouana’s move from Dakar to the French Riviera with the bourgeois white family who has hired her. Sembène, who got his start as an author and labor organizer, locates political gestures at their very seeds; in personal moments of impulse and morality, he tracks the gradual shift of Diouana’s temperament’s from optimistic to quietly defiant. Courtesy of a gorgeous new restoration from Janus, cinematographer Christian Lacoste’s stark frames deliver all of their original unmistakable symbolism, under the blindingly white sun of Antibes.

Dir Ousmane Sembène, 1966, DCP, 65 min.

Black Girl will be preceded by Sembène’s first short film, Borom Sarret, about the trials of an unlucky wagoner, also newly restored.

Dir Ousmane Sembène, 1963, DCP, 20 min.

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: George A. Romero's 'Season of the Witch'

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6/30 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

After his first zombie classic, Romero produced this endearing and atmospheric early ’70s experiment, worthy of rediscovery. Season Of The Witch tried to find an audience under other titles (Jack’s Wife and Hungry Wives), neither of which captured this surreal portrait of a housewife who resorts to suburban witchcraft when her husband and friends fail to provide any excitement. Don’t miss your chance to catch this ultra-rare slice of Romero in a bona fide 35mm print.

Dir. George A. Romero, 1972, 35mm, 104 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: Friday Night Frights - Inferno (w/ Leigh McCloskey & Irene Miracle in person!)

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7/1 - 10PM
$15/free for members

With an introduction by Leigh McCloskey, actor, author, and expert on the occult!

Foregoing conventional logic for pure nightmare dreamscape, Inferno finds director Dario Argento at the top of his game, and is the second film in his “Three Mothers” trilogy (directly following Suspiria). An American college student in Rome (Leigh McCloskey, frequent soap opera heartthrob and star of the infamous TV movie Alexander: The Other Side of Dawn) is called to New York to help his poet sister investigate the mysterious and supernatural history of her building. The threadbare plot serves as a springboard for some of Argento’s wildest set pieces (the underwater ballroom!), imaginative use of light and color, and continued exploration of visual alchemy propelled by a raging soundtrack (this time by Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s keyboard virtuoso Keith Emerson). With optical effects by Argento’s mentor, Italian grandmaster Mario Bava, Inferno is easily one of the most beautiful films in the Video Nasties canon — so don’t miss it loud ‘n large in 35mm!

Dir. Dario Argento, 1980, 35mm, 107 min.

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