Funny Face

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8/28 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

With music by George & Ira Gershwin and dresses by Givenchy, Funny Face is an exuberant jaunt through a comically extreme New York fashion world to the streets of Paris, replete with song, dance, and Fred Astaire. This one will hit you over the head with its flights of fancy and cutesy choreography, but the theatrically bookish Audrey Hepburn cuts right through the peacocky comedy with her charm, in the face of a dictatorial magazine editor played by Kay Thompson (said to be based on Vogue editor Diana Vreeland and Harper’s Bazaar editor Carmel Snow). But beyond Astaire and Hepburn’s starpower in their roles as photographer and muse, the film’s real success lies in Richard Avedon’s credit as “visual consultant.” Astaire’s character is said to be based on Avedon himself, appearing alongside Avedon favorite Dovima (as the whiny model Marion), while the film pops with the high contrast, high energy for which the iconic photographer was known.

Dir. Stanley Donen, 1957, DCP, 103 min.

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

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8/28 - 4PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Phantasmagoric Films of Piotr Kamler

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8/28 - 7PM
$14/free for members

Animation Breakdown has crossed paths with many wondrous works throughout its adventures in programming, but when it comes to the films of Piotr Kamler, we never fail to take a pause in order to gather our collective jaws off the floor. Often labeled as science fiction, Kamler’s works explore the inner depths of imagination more than the far reaches of outer space, eschewing linear narratives for dynamic, hallucinatory symbolism rendered in everything from clay to ink, paper cut-outs, early CGI and even pinboard animation — all paired with startling musique concrète scores by the likes of Luc Ferrari and Bernard Parmegiani. Tonight we’ll eagerly peer into Kamler’s mind-expanding output, culminating with a rare screening of Chronopolis (his only feature film), an Egyptian-flavored cybernetic opus that immediately sucks you into a transcendent alternate universe with its own M.C. Escher-like laws of physics, space, time, and dream-logic. As alien as every sound and every moving part is, it feels vaguely comforting and familiar, as if you remember it from childhood or dreams. Fans of surrealist animators the Brothers Quay will see similarities to their earlier films, which were likely influenced by this monumental achievement.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Cosmos

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8/28 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

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8/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Cosmos

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8/29 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

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8/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Cosmos

Cosmos_Victória Guerra (front), Jonathan_Genet (r)
8/30 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

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8/31 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Cosmos

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8/31 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Syl Johnson: Any Way the Wind Blows

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9/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Live set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Fans of 1960s R&B music know Syl Johnson as an influential African-American artist who cut under-appreciated classics like “Come On Sock It To Me” and “Is It Because I’m Black.” Despite enormous talent and a dynamic stage presence, mainstream success never happened for Syl. He drifted into obscurity while his smooth, sexy-voiced rival Al Green (“Let’s Stay Together”) zoomed to stardom. Syl eventually quit music and opened a chain of fast-food fish restaurants after disco crushed the memory of soul. Story over, right? Not so fast. Payback’s a bitch, and Syl—a righteously aggrieved curmudgeon—took his revenge in a most satisfying way. The opening seconds of his 1967 song “Different Strokes”—primal grunts over a stark drumbeat with Minnie Riperton’s laughter swirling overhead—became one of the most sampled breakbeats in hip-hop, and Syl turned into a litigation machine. And he was a natural! Syl got so much money from RZA and the Wu-Tang Clan that he now calls his home “The House That Wu Built.” While he chased down more people to sue, a new generation of fans discovered his classic records through the reissue record label Numero Group, and Syl’s on-stage career was reborn. With a funky, energetic soundtrack, an original score by Yo La Tengo, and interviews with hip-hop icons RZA, Prince Paul, Jazzy Jay, and Peanut Butter Wolf, this documentary is a buoyant and satisfying celebration of an unsung legend who stuck around around long enough to finally enjoy his redemption.

Dir. Robert Hatch-Miller, 2015, DCP, 85 min.

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

High School (35mm Restoration!)

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9/2 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Spookies

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9/2 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Rob Schrab (Found Crap, LEGO Movie 2) recreates a local TV creature feature show with SHOCK FEATURE THEATER! Each month, Hostess of the Dark, Mini Coffee, presents a horror film, or just horrible film, complete with vintage commercials, crappy clips, and musical guest The Git Back Gang. In September, SHOCK FEATURE THEATER offers a tale of a sorcerer who tries to sacrifice a group of people inside his house with the intention of using their vitality to keep his wife alive. Spookies makes up for lack of its story and likable characters with plenty of weird monsters! Come to witness the special noises the mud monsters make in the wine cellar!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Sports

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9/3 - 11AM
$10/free for members and kids under 14

From Baseball to Calvinball, the sport of competition has been a staple of cartoon camaraderie since animation first graced the screen. Before any of us ever cared about scoring a goal of our own, we were off to wacky races, the laugh-olympics, and the Goofy track and fields, This Saturday morning, celebrate the sport of life with a blend of classic and modern cartoons and curated commercial breaks! Ready, Set, Get your tickets!

Pajamas not mandatory, but encouraged. Complimentary cereal bar with a rotation of the best sugary cereals on the market (featuring our monthly mix) and a cash bar for the grown ups who want their sugar delivered in the form of a mimosa.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

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9/3 - 3PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Under the Sun

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9/3 - 6PM
$12/free for members

Wide-eyed Zin-mi, a young North Korean girl poised to join the Children’s Union, anchors Under the Sun, her expressive face belying the strain under which we find her. As director Vitaly Mansky follows her in the lead up to the “Day of the Shining Star” (Kim Jong-II’s birthday), he quietly takes a would-be propaganda film—designed by the North Korean government—back. After extensive negotiations with the North Korean government, Mansky was granted permission to film there, with ample caveats. But, in what is as great a feat of journalism as one of filmmaking, Mansky was able to secretly copy the footage that his keepers believed they had wiped from his memory cards. But even without this stealth, the incompatibility of reality and the North Korean-issued script are exceedingly tangible, as characters rattle off the health benefits of kimchi, the beauty of their great country, and the surplus of goods produced by happy factory workers, while a dance class sees fat tears run down Zin-mi’s face.

Dir. Vitaly Mansky, 2016, DCP, 110 min.

The Killing of America (35th Anniversary w/ filmmaker Sheldon Renan in person!)

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9/3 - 9PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by Drafthouse LA and Severin Films

Q&A to follow with director Sheldon Renan.

Totally ignored Stateside upon its initial early-’80s release — yet never more timely than right this moment — this stylish lost piece of the “mondo” film puzzle directly and coolly addresses the psyche-shattering reality of everyday American crime through inconceivable, ultra-rare news file footage of the era.

Written by Leonard Schrader (brother of Taxi Driver scribe Paul), The Killing Of America is a sharply-edited bird’s-eye-view comp of clips depicting assassinations, serial killers, race riots and even more shocking doses of pure outsized insanity. Even though the film was originally made for the same Japanese theatrical market as the fetishistic Faces of Death; this 100%-real newsreel assemblage eschews sensationalism and critique to form a wholly original, unforgettable big-screen experience.

In a year that brought us more mainstream docs addressing gun-rights issues than any other (Under the Gun, Newtown, The Armor of Light), we also look to the past for what’s perhaps the most honest portrayal of our country’s underbelly any audience will ever see.

Dir. Sheldon Renan and Leonard Schrader, 1981, digital presentation, 90 min.

Zouzou

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9/4 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Seeped in romance, unrequited love, and situational siblinghood, Marc Allégret’s Zouzou is a visual feast, showcasing scene after scene of delights, dance numbers–including a shadowplay sequence that will leave you squealing with glee–and a peak behind the curtain of Parisian music halls in the 30s. Josephine Baker (in the first starring role for an African American woman) is irresistible at every turn as she oozes charisma and pines for her orphaned “brother”–played with perfection by Jean Gabin (Touchez pas au Grisbi, The Grand Illusion)–whose love interests lie elsewhere, until a false accusation is thrown into the mix and obfuscates the whole thing.

Dir. Marc Allégret, 1934, 35mm, 92 min.

Dead Slow Ahead

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9/4 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Acropolis Cinema

Spanish director Mauro Herce’s directorial debut Dead Slow Ahead is a unique aesthetic object that plays at once like a vocational ethnography, and also as an experiential view of industrial advancement. Filmed on a commercial freighter off the coasts of Ukraine and New Orleans, the film situates the viewer, without context, directly in the bowels of the ship’s titanic hull, with clanking machinery, whirring turbines, and swells of oceanic furor enveloping the senses as we barrel forward in the grip of unforgiving conditions. Herce captures an astonishing array of natural wonders and crafts an extra-sensory tableaux of near-surrealist imagery with a steady hand and acute eye for the beauty of his surroundings. With its prismatic range of primary colors, aural ambiance, and disorienting spatial arrangements, Dead Slow Ahead constructs an immense formal infrastructure through which to conceive of the sheer physicality of life aboard the freighter. — Jordan Cronk, Brooklyn magazine

Dir. Mauro Herce, 2015, DCP, 74 min.

Dead Slow Ahead

9/4 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Acropolis Cinema

Spanish director Mauro Herce’s directorial debut Dead Slow Ahead is a unique aesthetic object that plays at once like a vocational ethnography, and also as an experiential view of industrial advancement. Filmed on a commercial freighter off the coasts of Ukraine and New Orleans, the film situates the viewer, without context, directly in the bowels of the ship’s titanic hull, with clanking machinery, whirring turbines, and swells of oceanic furor enveloping the senses as we barrel forward in the grip of unforgiving conditions. Herce captures an astonishing array of natural wonders and crafts an extra-sensory tableaux of near-surrealist imagery with a steady hand and acute eye for the beauty of his surroundings. With its prismatic range of primary colors, aural ambiance, and disorienting spatial arrangements, Dead Slow Ahead constructs an immense formal infrastructure through which to conceive of the sheer physicality of life aboard the freighter. — Jordan Cronk, Brooklyn magazine

Dir. Mauro Herce, 2015, DCP, 74 min.

Bowie Tribute Night feat. Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars (Off-site at Barnsdall Art Park)

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9/4 - 5:30PM
$25

Co-presented by Cinespia

The Stardust String Quartet will play classically arranged Bowie, while we sip wine under the stars!

With a Bowie Mixtape of rarities by Cinefamily staff programmers

In the summer of 1973, alien rock oddity Ziggy Stardust touched down at London’s Hammersmith Odeon for what would be his final earthly appearance with the Spiders from Mars before retiring his sci-fi persona and moving on to the next phase of Bowie. With one day to prepare, three available camera ops, and only the strobes from stage and flash photography from the crowd to illuminate his subjects, direct cinema pioneer and seasoned performance documentarian D.A. Pennebaker swiftly set about capturing our favorite extraterrestrial with frenetic camera energy to match that of his lithe, glamorous subjects. Extreme close-ups on Bowie’s intricately painted visage and wildly excessive dress, zooms into his svelte, bare gams, and close tracking of Mick Ronson’s dynamic guitar solos are stitched together for a film rife with an innate understanding of what the ultimate Bowie fan wants–and needs–from a concert film experience.

Dir. D.A. Pennebaker, 1979, digital presentation, 90 min.

SNEAK PEEK: Cameraperson (LA Premiere!)

Cameraperson
9/4 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the International Documentary Association

Like a collage of clippings from an assortment of diaries, the loose ends and outtakes swept from the cutting room floor of over 20 projects by other filmmakers are reconfigured and recontextualized into the non-narrative heart of veteran cinematographer Kirsten Johnson’s feature directorial debut. A fluid, subtle portrait of the unseen eye behind a lens in the service of scores of other visionaries, Cameraperson forms the visual memoir of a digressive filmmaker and her impressive career, offering glimpses at unused footage from films by the likes of Michael Moore, Laura Poitras and others. From what could be chaos emerges not just a clear descendent of the essay films of Chris Marker, but also a meditation on the immediacy of the candid and sensitive art of nonfiction filmmaking.

Cameraperson opens Sept. 23 at the Laemmle Royal.

Dir. Kirsten Johnson, 2016, DCP, 102 min.

Helmut Berger, Actor (LA Premiere!)

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9/4 - 9:30PM
$12/free for members

Much like its subject, Helmut Berger, Actor is impetuous, shocking, and undoubtedly divisive. Relentlessly intimate in execution, Actor pulls no punches in highlighting one of the industry’s coldest shoulders; Helmut Berger is unwilling and seemingly emotionally unable to discuss his time in the spotlight (as Luchino Vistonti’s muse in Ludwig and Conversation Piece, which ultimately led to his suicide attempt one year after Visconti died). Filmmaker Andreas Horvath and Helmut’s volatile relationship ultimately leads to brutal truths that bubble violently to the surface. As both subject and author fall victim to their extreme emotional turmoil, it becomes nearly impossible to tell if Helmut is putting on a show, or descending into madness, in a crescendo that will assuredly lodge itself in your gray matter forever.

Dir. Andreas Horvath, 2015, 90 min. DCP

Watch the trailer!

All These Sleepless Nights (LA Premiere!)

9/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

All These Sleepless Nights floats through the nighttime hours in contemporary Warsaw, guided by the restless consciousness of two twenty-ish boys, Michal and Krzysztof, who—along with Eva, the third character in this Jules et Jim-esque formation—have writing credits on this “doc.” Not much their senior, director and cinematographer Michael Marczak has identified the instantaneous patina that drenches young adulthood, capturing it with energetic contemporaneity rather than nostalgia. In this first feature, edited with Dorota Wardeszkiewicz (who edited for Krzysztof Kieslowski), the boys go to clubs, wander the streets, hang out in sparsely furnished apartments, meet girls. Their brand of lazy iconoclasm can sound like a youthful lifestyle-y piece, but the artistic vision of this film is far more ambitious: the understated and honest performances/lives pulse with the full-body commitment of dance, which is perhaps the film’s greatest source of inspiration. The dance scenes–from the deep synths of Warsaw clubs, through a traffic jam, in a field on an overcast day–reveal a deep sense of intuition, while the nimble camera, too, glides through raves and city streets with the magnetic ease of a dancer.

Dir. Michael Marczak, 2016, DCP, 100 min.

All These Sleepless Nights (LA Premiere!)

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9/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

All These Sleepless Nights floats through the nighttime hours in contemporary Warsaw, guided by the restless consciousness of two twenty-ish boys, Michal and Krzysztof, who—along with Eva, the third character in this Jules et Jim-esque formation—have writing credits on this “doc.” Not much their senior, director and cinematographer Michael Marczak has identified the instantaneous patina that drenches young adulthood, capturing it with energetic contemporaneity rather than nostalgia. In this first feature, edited with Dorota Wardeszkiewicz (who edited for Krzysztof Kieslowski), the boys go to clubs, wander the streets, hang out in sparsely furnished apartments, meet girls. Their brand of lazy iconoclasm can sound like a youthful lifestyle-y piece, but the artistic vision of this film is far more ambitious: the understated and honest performances/lives pulse with the full-body commitment of dance, which is perhaps the film’s greatest source of inspiration. The dance scenes–from the deep synths of Warsaw clubs, through a traffic jam, in a field on an overcast day–reveal a deep sense of intuition, while the nimble camera, too, glides through raves and city streets with the magnetic ease of a dancer.

Dir. Michael Marczak, 2016, DCP, 100 min.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

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9/5 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Devil (DCP Restoration)

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9/6 - 9:45PM
$12/free for members

Restoration courtesy of the Polish Cultural Institute New York

Hitting an off-the-charts level of subversive allegory, Zulawski’s second feature is a blood-splattered rampage through a war-charred 1790s Poland that turns the historical epic inside out, and dances on its carcass. Immediately banned in the director’s Communist Poland for over a decade and a half, The Devil writhes with nonstop demonic energy as it follows a nobleman who, after escaping from prison, swan dives into insanity and mass murder. Returning home to his once-rich family—now reduced to savagery—and manipulated by a black-cloaked Satanic stranger at the center of a web of political treachery, the nobleman eventually enacts a Hamlet-like pyrrhic revenge on just about everyone in sight. But The Devil’s most spectacularly intense violence is all emotional, with near-constant outbursts of grief, and desperation of a seizure-like intensity that is downright mesmerizing. You won’t be able to look away, and with the way Zulawski’s gloriously restless camerawork captures all the detail, you’ll never want to.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1972, Digital Presentation, 119 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

High School (35mm Restoration!)

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9/7 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: Frame by Frame

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9/7 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Craving cartoons? Anxious for animation? We’ve been saving up a stockpile of celluloid silliness and stop-motion mayhem that’s guaranteed to inspire. This program honors animators with the dedication to put their films together one frame at a time, unbound by the normal pace of 24 images per second. We’ll screen pioneering stop-motion works from Ladislas Starevich and Norman McLaren, some lesser-known studio rarities, George Griffin’s multimedia animation epic Lineage and much more. Best of all, the entire collection of shorts will be projected from original film prints! There’s a masterpiece in every blink of the eye with this collection of shorts captured frame by frame.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Dekalog I & II

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9/9 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog I
Krzysztof Kieślowski’s sprawling masterwork, set in and around a large housing complex in late-communist Poland, opens with the relationship between a University professor father and his inquisitive young son. An unforgivingly icy winter sets the tone for a harsh parable told with the filmmaker’s trademark humanist objectivity, concerning the first of the ten commandments—“thou shalt have no other god before me”—as seen in opposition to the logic, reason, and science that the father has chosen to live by, indelibly captured by a deep indigo ink spill.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 56 min.

Dekalog II
For his second portrait of the residents who orbit Dekalog’s ubiquitous apartment complex, Kieślowski chooses the everyday drama of a hospital ward and a practitioner of society’s godliest profession—a doctor—as the vehicles for his examination of the sanctity of human speech. With immersive and attentive cinematography by Edward Klosinski that zeroes in on the intricacies of peeling paint, dripping water, and steaming kettles, Kieślowski tells a moral tale without the moralizing: of the suffering of Dorota, a woman anxiously awaiting her ill husband’s recovery, and the demands she makes of the sick man’s doctor.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 59 min.

Dekalog III & IV

Dekalog-4
9/9 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog III
Christmas Eve gives way to a night of reckoning for Janusz and Ewa, whose chance meeting at mass prompts their twin reflections on their affair and their lives since its end. With shades of Vertigo, Ewa’s words become a game and her emotions a performance in this all-nighter through Kraków’s streets, train stations, hospitals, and dumping grounds for drunkards. As Ewa dares Janusz to make himself more and more vulnerable, Kieślowski speculates around the commandment “thou shalt not commit adultery,” albeit with more sympathy for his characters’ futile struggle than pronouncements of condemnation.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 58 min.

Dekalog IV
In his fourth chapter of life inside the building, Kieślowski tackles one his toughest topics yet: an intimate and loving father-daughter relationship. The interdependent pair’s normality is quickly thrown into pandemonium at the discovery of a never-quite disclosed letter. Kieślowski’s “moral tale” methodology glows with mystery this time around—and is all the better for it—as we watch Anka and Michal’s stumbling attempts to, by turns, root their parent-child relationship in society’s norms, and also to undo it.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 57 min.

Chicago

chicago-1927
9/10 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Featuring live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick
35mm preservation print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive

Made hot on the tails of original play, the Cecil B. DeMille produced Chicago is based on the salacious, scintillating tale of Beulah Annan (fictionalized as Roxie Hart) and the sensational murder of her husband. The event itself, Maurine Dallas Watkins stage rendition, and a heaping spoonful of Hollywood sleaze combine in the film that would spawn a hit-Broadway play and the 2002 big-Hollywood Academy Award-winning film version as well. A story poised to be retold over and over, Chicago’s murderous plot sees the sassy Phyllis Haver as Roxie, ”the jazz slayer” aka “Chicago’s most beautiful murderess,” grab the gun. See it to believe it!

Dir. Frank Urson, 1927, 35mm, 118 min.

Law and Order

lawandorder_480_309
9/10 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Watching Law & Order, one feels almost as if the black and white 16mm film is the only signifier of time having passed; Wiseman’s attention to the structures of law enforcement and their interaction with race and class seems not to have aged one bit, even 47 years later. The made-for-TV, Emmy-winning doc (best news documentary in 1969) is the filmmaker’s foray into the riots-era Kansas City, MO police department of 1968. As his camera roves, it captures myriad situations that officers are called upon to resolve – some appropriately within their jurisdiction, and others seemingly dumped upon them because civilians didn’t know where else to turn; one such a case is a domestic dispute over child-custody which results in the officer telling the child’s father that he simply must hire a lawyer if anything’s to be done. Wiseman’s hard look at the relations between officers and civilians is sympathetic and genuine, attuned to the limitations of the staid categories of law and order, and the humanity and chaos that spill out of them.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1969, 16mm, 81 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Dekalog V & VI

Dekalog-6
9/10 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog V
Perhaps the episode with the frankest political message, V employs the commandment “thou shalt not kill” as a conduit to explore not just the sanctity of human life, but also Kieślowski’s own personal stance against the death penalty. A young drifter, tearing through town like a child still experimenting with socially acceptable boundaries, sets out on a nihilistic mini-rampage through Warsaw that ends in a senseless killing. Frequent collaborator Slawomir Idziak (Three Colors: Blue, The Double Life of Veronique) alternates between clinically stark and melancholically saturated cinematography in this precursor to A Short Film About Killing.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 57 min

Dekalog VI
An acute, voyeuristic study of the nature of obsession and passion, VI proposes a Kieślowskian take on “thou shalt not covet” through the consistently imbalanced relationship between a teenaged peeping Tom and his mature, unwilling objet du désir. Witold Adamek’s handheld, leering camera (which carries into his and Kieślowski’s feature-length rendition, A Short Film About Love) provides both the immediacy of emotions between two people and the private lives behind every window in the somber apartment block wherein each of these ten micro-dramas unfolds.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 58 min

Renoir's French Cancan

frenchcancan_480_309
9/11 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

“This celebration of life, art and the City of Light (with a cameo by Edith Piaf) is a Technicolor tour de force by a master of modern cinema.” – Criterion Collection

Description coming soon…

Dir. Jean Renoir, 1954, 102 min.

Dekalog VII & VIII

dekalog7
9/11 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog VII
“Can you steal what is really yours?” The morally-ambiguous answer to this question that kicks off VII calls both governing laws and cultural mores of ownership into question as Kieślowski explores what it means to steal a human life. The commandment we learn to grasp at the earliest age—the concept “thou shalt not steal”—is scrutinized when a young woman kidnaps her own child, Ania, in an attempt to reclaim the girl who has thus far been raised by her parents. Through Ania’s eyes, we watch as these adults fumble through the irreparable damage that covert theft and selfish possessiveness can wreak on a family for generations.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 58 min

Dekalog VIII
An exploration of the sanctity of truth, VIII takes ethics professor Zofia and Holocaust survivor Elżbieta outside of the familiar Warsaw apartment block to another building with another distinct array of covert, complicated stories, including a poignant past shared between the two women. As we learn that even an edifice can be a witness to our shame and humiliation, the delicate nuance involved in upholding the commandment “thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor” expands Kieślowski’s series in orders of magnitude, including a direct reference to II and a foreshadowing of X. Based on the personal childhood experience of Polish journalist Hanna Krall, VIII reminds us that this “interesting building” in which all our protagonists reside is, in reality, “just the same as any other”—filled with endless stories the surface of which we can only begin to scratch.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 55 min

A "Jules et Jim" Picnic (Off-site at Barnsdall Art Park)

julesetjim_480_309
9/11 - 5:30PM
$25

Co-presented by La Collectionneuse, Decandanse Soirée, and Zebulon LA

Zebulon LA, the new outpost by the beloved Brooklyn music cafe, presents music by John Herndon and Jeff Parker (of Tortoise) and Decadanse Soirée will bring the French tunes, as we all picnic before one of the greatest French films of all time.

The defining film of the French New Wave, endlessly referenced and reimagined, Jules et Jim’s iconic, tragic love triangle–with the Austrian Jules, his French bohemian friend Jim, and the enigmatic Catherine as its points–is a romance that echoes throughout pop culture, zeroing in on that perennial draw: youthful love too perfect to last. Buoyed along by a kind of propulsive jouissance, this third feature from Truffaut (following The 400 Blows and Shoot the Piano Player) pushed boundaries with its every move–with nimble and fluid nouvelle vague-defining camerawork, evocative music, and stellar performances (especially from cool girl and award-winner Jeanne Moreau).

Dir François Truffaut, 1962, digital presentation, 105 mins.

Dekalog IX & X

Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 3.58.42 PM
9/11 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog IX
With episode IX, Kieślowski continues to showcase a complete disinterest in moralizing. Focusing on a marriage shaken when a husband discovers his impotence and subsequently offers his wife a seemingly enticing compromise, this moral tale centers on one man’s obsession as jealousy leads him down a dark path of discovery. With cynically humorous symbolism, emotionally raw performances, and sumptuous cinematography, Kieślowski and screenwriter Krzysztof Piesiewicz deliver a deft, emotionally complex take on “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife.”

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 58 min.

Dekalog X
One of the only comedies—albeit pitch-black—in Kieślowski’s career (pre-dating his masterful dark comedy, White), Dekalog X, or “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s goods,” appropriately begins at a punk show for a band not-so-subtly called “City Death.” As two brothers untangle the news of their father’s passing and discover his place in the world of high-end stamp collecting, greed and a covetous lust quickly consume them and the comical crew of thieves and scheisters in their orbit. What follows is a series of melodramatic MacGuffins as the brothers gain and lose stamps, money, and, most importantly, their sense of self.

Dir. Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 55 min.

Dekalog I & II

Dekalog2-3
9/11 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog I
Krzysztof Kieślowski’s sprawling masterwork, set in and around a large housing complex in late-communist Poland, opens with the relationship between a University professor father and his inquisitive young son. An unforgivingly icy winter sets the tone for a harsh parable told with the filmmaker’s trademark humanist objectivity, concerning the first of the ten commandments—“thou shalt have no other god before me”—as seen in opposition to the logic, reason, and science that the father has chosen to live by, indelibly captured by a deep indigo ink spill.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 56 min.

Dekalog II
For his second portrait of the residents who orbit Dekalog’s ubiquitous apartment complex, Kieślowski chooses the everyday drama of a hospital ward and a practitioner of society’s godliest profession—a doctor—as the vehicles for his examination of the sanctity of human speech. With immersive and attentive cinematography by Edward Klosinski that zeroes in on the intricacies of peeling paint, dripping water, and steaming kettles, Kieślowski tells a moral tale without the moralizing: of the suffering of Dorota, a woman anxiously awaiting her ill husband’s recovery, and the demands she makes of the sick man’s doctor.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 59 min.

Dekalog III & IV

Dekalog-4
9/12 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog III
Christmas Eve gives way to a night of reckoning for Janusz and Ewa, whose chance meeting at mass prompts their twin reflections on their affair and their lives since its end. With shades of Vertigo, Ewa’s words become a game and her emotions a performance in this all-nighter through Kraków’s streets, train stations, hospitals, and dumping grounds for drunkards. As Ewa dares Janusz to make himself more and more vulnerable, Kieślowski speculates around the commandment “thou shalt not commit adultery,” albeit with more sympathy for his characters’ futile struggle than pronouncements of condemnation.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 58 min.

Dekalog IV
In his fourth chapter of life inside the building, Kieślowski tackles one his toughest topics yet: an intimate and loving father-daughter relationship. The interdependent pair’s normality is quickly thrown into pandemonium at the discovery of a never-quite disclosed letter. Kieślowski’s “moral tale” methodology glows with mystery this time around—and is all the better for it—as we watch Anka and Michal’s stumbling attempts to, by turns, root their parent-child relationship in society’s norms, and also to undo it.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 57 min.

Dekalog V & VI

Dekalog-6
9/12 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog V
Perhaps the episode with the frankest political message, V employs the commandment “thou shalt not kill” as a conduit to explore not just the sanctity of human life, but also Kieślowski’s own personal stance against the death penalty. A young drifter, tearing through town like a child still experimenting with socially acceptable boundaries, sets out on a nihilistic mini-rampage through Warsaw that ends in a senseless killing. Frequent collaborator Slawomir Idziak (Three Colors: Blue, The Double Life of Veronique) alternates between clinically stark and melancholically saturated cinematography in this precursor to A Short Film About Killing.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 57 min

Dekalog VI
An acute, voyeuristic study of the nature of obsession and passion, VI proposes a Kieślowskian take on “thou shalt not covet” through the consistently imbalanced relationship between a teenaged peeping Tom and his mature, unwilling objet du désir. Witold Adamek’s handheld, leering camera (which carries into his and Kieślowski’s feature-length rendition, A Short Film About Love) provides both the immediacy of emotions between two people and the private lives behind every window in the somber apartment block wherein each of these ten micro-dramas unfolds.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 58 min

Dekalog VII & VIII

dekalog7
9/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog VII
“Can you steal what is really yours?” The morally-ambiguous answer to this question that kicks off VII calls both governing laws and cultural mores of ownership into question as Kieślowski explores what it means to steal a human life. The commandment we learn to grasp at the earliest age—the concept “thou shalt not steal”—is scrutinized when a young woman kidnaps her own child, Ania, in an attempt to reclaim the girl who has thus far been raised by her parents. Through Ania’s eyes, we watch as these adults fumble through the irreparable damage that covert theft and selfish possessiveness can wreak on a family for generations.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 58 min

Dekalog VIII
An exploration of the sanctity of truth, VIII takes ethics professor Zofia and Holocaust survivor Elżbieta outside of the familiar Warsaw apartment block to another building with another distinct array of covert, complicated stories, including a poignant past shared between the two women. As we learn that even an edifice can be a witness to our shame and humiliation, the delicate nuance involved in upholding the commandment “thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor” expands Kieślowski’s series in orders of magnitude, including a direct reference to II and a foreshadowing of X. Based on the personal childhood experience of Polish journalist Hanna Krall, VIII reminds us that this “interesting building” in which all our protagonists reside is, in reality, “just the same as any other”—filled with endless stories the surface of which we can only begin to scratch.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 55 min

Dekalog IX & X

Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 3.58.42 PM
9/13 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog IX
With episode IX, Kieślowski continues to showcase a complete disinterest in moralizing. Focusing on a marriage shaken when a husband discovers his impotence and subsequently offers his wife a seemingly enticing compromise, this moral tale centers on one man’s obsession as jealousy leads him down a dark path of discovery. With cynically humorous symbolism, emotionally raw performances, and sumptuous cinematography, Kieślowski and screenwriter Krzysztof Piesiewicz deliver a deft, emotionally complex take on “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife.”

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 58 min.

Dekalog X
One of the only comedies—albeit pitch-black—in Kieślowski’s career (pre-dating his masterful dark comedy, White), Dekalog X, or “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s goods,” appropriately begins at a punk show for a band not-so-subtly called “City Death.” As two brothers untangle the news of their father’s passing and discover his place in the world of high-end stamp collecting, greed and a covetous lust quickly consume them and the comical crew of thieves and scheisters in their orbit. What follows is a series of melodramatic MacGuffins as the brothers gain and lose stamps, money, and, most importantly, their sense of self.

Dir. Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 55 min.

Hospital (35mm Restoration!)

hospital_480_309
9/16 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

In pre-HIPAA 1970, inside the four walls of the Metropolitan Hospital in New York’s East Harlem, Frederick Wiseman made a film that depended on a degree of access to doctors and patients that is unfathomable today. We see overtaxed doctors handle everything from stoned hippies to neglected children to alcoholics–lots of alcoholics. Wiseman’s attentive gaze never leans on simplification, even as he stares stereotypes in the face. Doctors aren’t villains–they’re flawed and overworked, and sometimes they go the extra mile for their patients while other times they discuss lunch alongside deep suffering. The alcoholics and druggies and various other oft-underprivileged patients that burst through the ER doors aren’t villains either– they are people at the mercy of a limited institution for care. This newly restored 35mm print is an invitation into the bowels of a place where the American movie-going public will likely never be invited again.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1970, 35mm, 84 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Dekalog I & II

Dekalog2-3
9/17 - 12PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog I
Krzysztof Kieślowski’s sprawling masterwork, set in and around a large housing complex in late-communist Poland, opens with the relationship between a University professor father and his inquisitive young son. An unforgivingly icy winter sets the tone for a harsh parable told with the filmmaker’s trademark humanist objectivity, concerning the first of the ten commandments—“thou shalt have no other god before me”—as seen in opposition to the logic, reason, and science that the father has chosen to live by, indelibly captured by a deep indigo ink spill.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 56 min.

Dekalog II
For his second portrait of the residents who orbit Dekalog’s ubiquitous apartment complex, Kieślowski chooses the everyday drama of a hospital ward and a practitioner of society’s godliest profession—a doctor—as the vehicles for his examination of the sanctity of human speech. With immersive and attentive cinematography by Edward Klosinski that zeroes in on the intricacies of peeling paint, dripping water, and steaming kettles, Kieślowski tells a moral tale without the moralizing: of the suffering of Dorota, a woman anxiously awaiting her ill husband’s recovery, and the demands she makes of the sick man’s doctor.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 59 min.

Dekalog III & IV

Dekalog-4
9/17 - 3PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog III
Christmas Eve gives way to a night of reckoning for Janusz and Ewa, whose chance meeting at mass prompts their twin reflections on their affair and their lives since its end. With shades of Vertigo, Ewa’s words become a game and her emotions a performance in this all-nighter through Kraków’s streets, train stations, hospitals, and dumping grounds for drunkards. As Ewa dares Janusz to make himself more and more vulnerable, Kieślowski speculates around the commandment “thou shalt not commit adultery,” albeit with more sympathy for his characters’ futile struggle than pronouncements of condemnation.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 58 min.

Dekalog IV
In his fourth chapter of life inside the building, Kieślowski tackles one his toughest topics yet: an intimate and loving father-daughter relationship. The interdependent pair’s normality is quickly thrown into pandemonium at the discovery of a never-quite disclosed letter. Kieślowski’s “moral tale” methodology glows with mystery this time around—and is all the better for it—as we watch Anka and Michal’s stumbling attempts to, by turns, root their parent-child relationship in society’s norms, and also to undo it.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 57 min.

Dekalog V & VI

Dekalog-6
9/17 - 6PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog V
Perhaps the episode with the frankest political message, V employs the commandment “thou shalt not kill” as a conduit to explore not just the sanctity of human life, but also Kieślowski’s own personal stance against the death penalty. A young drifter, tearing through town like a child still experimenting with socially acceptable boundaries, sets out on a nihilistic mini-rampage through Warsaw that ends in a senseless killing. Frequent collaborator Slawomir Idziak (Three Colors: Blue, The Double Life of Veronique) alternates between clinically stark and melancholically saturated cinematography in this precursor to A Short Film About Killing.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 57 min

Dekalog VI
An acute, voyeuristic study of the nature of obsession and passion, VI proposes a Kieślowskian take on “thou shalt not covet” through the consistently imbalanced relationship between a teenaged peeping Tom and his mature, unwilling objet du désir. Witold Adamek’s handheld, leering camera (which carries into his and Kieślowski’s feature-length rendition, A Short Film About Love) provides both the immediacy of emotions between two people and the private lives behind every window in the somber apartment block wherein each of these ten micro-dramas unfolds.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 58 min

Silk Stockings

silkstockings_480_309
9/18 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Co-presented by warnerarchive_300_90

Cyd Charisse and Fred Astaire dance their final number before a Parisian backdrop in this delightfully silly sendup of golden-age Hollywood excess. Charisse’s stoic Soviet operative, Ninotchka Yoschenko, prefers the fireglow of the iron foundries behind Paris’ major public works over its romantic boulevards, until Astaire’s enterprising American producer sweeps her away to the tunes of Cole Porter. A swingin’ swansong made by major studio players before Old Hollywood came crashing down, Silk Stockings finds Astaire and Charisse in their final Freed Unit production, coincidentally the final completed film by musical pioneer Rouben Mamoulian, and also features a late-career comic turn from Peter Lorre as one-third of a trio of bumbling Soviet commissars seduced by the City of Lights.

Dir. Rouben Mamoulian, 1957, 35mm, 117 min.

Dekalog VII & VIII

dekalog7
9/18 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog VII
“Can you steal what is really yours?” The morally-ambiguous answer to this question that kicks off VII calls both governing laws and cultural mores of ownership into question as Kieślowski explores what it means to steal a human life. The commandment we learn to grasp at the earliest age—the concept “thou shalt not steal”—is scrutinized when a young woman kidnaps her own child, Ania, in an attempt to reclaim the girl who has thus far been raised by her parents. Through Ania’s eyes, we watch as these adults fumble through the irreparable damage that covert theft and selfish possessiveness can wreak on a family for generations.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 58 min

Dekalog VIII
An exploration of the sanctity of truth, VIII takes ethics professor Zofia and Holocaust survivor Elżbieta outside of the familiar Warsaw apartment block to another building with another distinct array of covert, complicated stories, including a poignant past shared between the two women. As we learn that even an edifice can be a witness to our shame and humiliation, the delicate nuance involved in upholding the commandment “thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor” expands Kieślowski’s series in orders of magnitude, including a direct reference to II and a foreshadowing of X. Based on the personal childhood experience of Polish journalist Hanna Krall, VIII reminds us that this “interesting building” in which all our protagonists reside is, in reality, “just the same as any other”—filled with endless stories the surface of which we can only begin to scratch.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 55 min

An Evening of EXPANDED Cinema on 16mm (Off-site at Barnsdall Art Park)

john16mm_480_309
9/18 - 5:30PM
$25

An evening of the greatest experimental, exploratory, and psychedelic filmmakers on 16mm. Film lineup TBA!

Dekalog IX & X

Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 3.58.42 PM
9/18 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Dekalog IX
With episode IX, Kieślowski continues to showcase a complete disinterest in moralizing. Focusing on a marriage shaken when a husband discovers his impotence and subsequently offers his wife a seemingly enticing compromise, this moral tale centers on one man’s obsession as jealousy leads him down a dark path of discovery. With cynically humorous symbolism, emotionally raw performances, and sumptuous cinematography, Kieślowski and screenwriter Krzysztof Piesiewicz deliver a deft, emotionally complex take on “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s wife.”

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 58 min.

Dekalog X
One of the only comedies—albeit pitch-black—in Kieślowski’s career (pre-dating his masterful dark comedy, White), Dekalog X, or “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s goods,” appropriately begins at a punk show for a band not-so-subtly called “City Death.” As two brothers untangle the news of their father’s passing and discover his place in the world of high-end stamp collecting, greed and a covetous lust quickly consume them and the comical crew of thieves and scheisters in their orbit. What follows is a series of melodramatic MacGuffins as the brothers gain and lose stamps, money, and, most importantly, their sense of self.

Dir. Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 55 min.

A Short Film About Love

shortfilmaboutlove
9/19 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Acting as a feature length version of the 6th episode of Dekalog, A Short Film About Love sees Kieślowski at quite possibly his bleakest, as he posits that love is ultimately sex and nothing else (although the film—unlike the episode—teases a sliver of hope). Owing just as much to Hitchcock’s Rear Window as to anything biblical, Kieślowski explores obsession, voyeurism, and deification of women as objects in this deceptively simple parable about the dangers of infatuation posing as love, interrogating the implicit power structures at play between a virgin and the promiscuous older woman he spies on.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP, 86 min.

A Short Film About Killing

shortboutkill1
9/19 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Kieślowski’s first feature after Dekalog, A Short Film About Killing expands upon various interactions in V, turning brief exchanges into conversations and filling out elisions of the devastating violence. Unconstrained by the demands of state-run television, Kieślowski shows the sometimes brutal consequences of violent choices and gestures, from the opening shot in a shadowy gutter to the grim cells of the final act. Buoyed by additional sequences that give the film more private moments of triumph and youthful expectation than its hour-long progenitor, Killing also highlights class divisions and how they contribute to each character’s sense of powerlessness. Considered an instrumental contribution towards the abolition of capital punishment in Poland, this film brought Kieślowski his first international attention.

Dir. Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1988, DCP restoration, 86 min.

Maggie Lee's "Mommy" (w/ Maggie Lee in person!)

mommy_screenshots_13_1140
9/21 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinefamily EXP & 356 S. Mission Rd.

A memory palace built with an impressively exhaustive personal archive, Maggie Lee’s Mommy is a portrait of the artist before and after her mother’s unexpected death. With the detritus and accoutrements that accompanied coming of age at the turn of the century, Maggie Lee collages an essay film that plays like a blog, a family history that unfurls like the pages of a zine, and an elegy in the spirit of DIY culture. This is the artist’s first film, but it feels like one she’s been preparing to make since her suburban New Jersey childhood, propelled by the compulsive, frenetic, rhizomatic collecting and archiving that accompany growing up alongside the World Wide Web.

Dir. Maggie Lee, 2015, digital presentation, 55 min.

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Ticket to Write: The Golden Age of Rock Music Journalism

tickettowrite_480_309
9/22 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Q&A with filmmakers and rock journalist guest panel!

“We were rock stars!” explains former Creem editor Jaan Uhelszki. From 1966-81, music magazines gave counter culture its literary wit—and the writers were as flamboyant as the rock stars. Music critics like Lester Bangs, Richard Meltzer, Ben Fong-Torres, Gene Sculatti, Sandy Pearlman, Susan Whitall, Bill Holdship, and Sylvie Simmons developed followings of thousands of music listeners who loyally read their writing in the pages of Crawdaddy, Rolling Stone, Creem, Circus, Hit Parader, Trouser Press, New York Rocker, Who Put the Bomp, Mojo and countless other zines, alt-weeklies, and student rags. However, when MTV emerged in 1981, the magazines saw their market share collapse as America shifted from print media to cable television—young people wanted their MTV. Follow the rise and fall of the rock n’ roll magazine!

Dir. Raul Sandelin, 2016, Digital Presentation, 85 min.

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

Basic Training

basictraining_480_309
9/24 - 4PM
$12/free for members

As dozens of plainclothes youth, their hair still long and their blue-jeaned gait still casual, stream out of a bus and into an unmarked building, we are invited to take part in Basic Training, Frederick Wiseman’s immersive portrait of the nine weeks of Army training camp that each new enlisted and drafted recruit must endure. Intense discussions on the ethics of combat precede automatic weapons training, the severity of this message somewhat undone by the ridiculous moral tales in their marching cadences, and a moment of levity during a dental hygiene video. Embedded deeply within the rank-and-file at Fort Knox, Wiseman’s observant camera follows each detail and process as new intakes learn the proper way to scrub a urinal, sergeants hammer through marching drills, and the highest-ranking officers deliver motivational speeches to the impressionable minds that stare a potential Vietnam deployment squarely in the face.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1971, 16mm, 80 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Under the Roofs of Paris

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9/25 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Under the Roofs of Paris begins with an engrossing establishing shot that drifts downward from the Parisian rooftops. A street singer transforms the cobbled streets into a church-like gathering place, inviting early morning passersby to congregate and join in the choruses in a warm display of local solidarity. Initially skeptical of the then-new sound-sync technology, Rene Clair’s first foray into sound film is an accomplished experiment, a sympathetic look at a working class love triangle that mixes subtle silent-film pantomime with sparse dialogue and engaging song. His dreamily fluid camerawork effortlessly situates the small-scale melodrama within the titular metropolis, making it emblematic without sacrificing its sense of intimacy.

Dir. René Clair, 1930, 35mm (Print Courtesy of the Institut Francais), 96 min.

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A Tribute to Carlinhos Pandeiro de Ouro feat. Black Orpheus (Off-site at Barnsdall Art Park)

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9/25 - 5:30PM
$25

Incredibly, one of the children in this Brazilian classic has grown up to be one the world’s greatest Samba players, and lives right here in Los Angeles. On this day, we will pay tribute to this important and influential musical ambassador, with a “Roda de Choro” (a musical jam) hosted by Thalma De Freitus and other incredible musicians.

Marcel Camus’ Black Orpheus took the cinema world by storm upon its release, nabbing both the Palme d’Or and an Oscar for its irresistibly joyous, yet at times aptly melancholic Brazilian retelling of the myth of Eurydice and Orpheus, by way of the Carnivale in Rio and an epochal Bossa Nova soundtrack. Pulsating with life and featuring near-grandiloquent delivery of the myth’s monologues via beautifully lifelike shots (courtesy of Jean Bourgoin’s handling of his Eastmancolor film stock), Orpheus changed the landscape of international arthouse cinema.

Dir. Marcel Camus, 1959, Digital Presentation, 100 min.

An American in Paris

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9/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Whether conducting a rudimentary English lesson for his arrondissements’ local school children or tidying up his microscopic attic apartment, Gene Kelly’s Jerry Mulligan leads a life so effortlessly infused with choreography, even his daydreams are set to song. Culminating in an elaborate, unprecedented, 17-minute dance number (price tag: nearly $5 million dollars in 2016), Vincente Minnelli’s An American in Paris also fashions the appropriate Siene-side stage for the on-screen debut of Leslie Caron (Gigi, Daddy Long Legs), who Kelly discovered in the Ballet des Champs Elysées and brought back stateside specifically for this picture. An immediately recognizable Gershwin songbook paired with the iconic set pieces of a classic Hollywood musical master and perfectly-integrated choreography from Kelly himself (not to mention the loveable sourpuss on Oscar Levant) make this a universally delightful watch, rich with the natural romanticism and swelling emotion of the City of Lights.

Dir. Vincente Minnelli, 1951, 35mm, 113 min.

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Gary Numan: Android in La La Land

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9/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Android In La La Land is a celebration of a British music-making pioneer and the love story that helped him turn his life around. At the end of the 1970s, Gary Numan found himself to be one of the world’s biggest-selling artists, “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?” and “Cars” were huge hits, no-one had heard, or seen, anyone like him.

Asperger’s syndrome helped forge Numan’s ambition, his music and image, but it brought problems. At a time when the public knew little about the condition, the press labeled him a freak, one paper suggested his parents should have been doctored for giving birth to him. Depression, near bankruptcy and a period in the wilderness followed. Then Numan fell in love with his biggest fan, and married her…

Dir. Steve Read & Rob Alexander, 2016, DCP, 85 min.

Watch the trailer!

Essene

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10/1 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Named after the ascetic community purported to have scribed the Dead Sea Scrolls, Essene finds Wiseman immersed in a Benedictine monastery in rural Michigan, whose members struggle to reconcile their individual idiosyncrasies with the community’s collective needs. He films the brethren in prayer, at study, holding mass, and maintaining the grounds, granted access even to private counseling sessions. In a departure from earlier works, he returns to a few subjects, allowing them to become characters in their own right, including one monk on the brink of a nervous breakdown. Wiseman’s presence is all but invisible here, including one virtuosic 360-degree handheld shot around the abbot in the middle of a mass service.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1972, 16mm, 86 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Academy of Muses

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10/2 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Acropolis Cinema

Spanish filmmaker José Luis Guerín’s first narrative feature since the beloved In the City of Sylvia is a work of both immaculate refinement and deceptive ambition. Centered on a married, middle-aged philosophy professor (Raffaele Pinto) who uses his theories on creativity and the role of the muse to intellectually seduce his female students, the film furthers Guerín’s interest in the psychology underpinning the male-female dynamic, constructing a reflexive framework through which to interrogate the very process of artistic inspiration. Set in the world of academia yet bereft of the monotony suggested by such a setting, the film unfolds in the guise of nonfiction before flowering into a moral tale of literary expanse. Beautifully composed and intimately pitched, The Academy of Muses brings art and life into unique dialogue, stimulating the senses as readily as it prompts reflection.

Dir. José Luis Guerín, 2015, DCP, 92 min.

Watch the trailer!

"Fellini Satyricon" Food Orgy! (Off-site at Barnsdall Art Park)

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10/2 - 5:30PM
$25

Join us for a late-summer Satyricon style feast before the film, en plein air!

Even after the orgiastic stylings of his Juliet of the Spirits and “Toby Damnit” segment from Spirits of the Dead, no one was prepared when Fellini unleashed this bizarre, druggy adaptation of the ancient (and incomplete) Petronius classic. In first-century Rome, two attractive students (Martin Potter and Hiram Keller) fight it out over a young boy, which sets them all off on a series of bizarre adventures involving hermaphrodites, impotence potions, dwarfs, and opulent costumes and sets from such greats as Dante Ferretti and Danilo Donati, all shot in gorgeous Cinemascope. The obvious inspiration for Caligula, it remains the wildest Roman spectacle of them all and cheerfully revels in the fact that it makes no damn sense, right up to the cliffhanger final scene. Many critics hated this when it opened, but it’s now rightfully regarded as a classic. And look fast for a very early, chubby role by hairy fitness guru Richard Simmons!

Dir. Federico Fellini, 1969, digital presentation, 128 min.

Juvenile Court

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10/8 - 4PM
$12/free for members

An attentive and non-judgemental look at the youth courts system in Memphis, Juvenile Court showcases Wiseman’s inimitable observational abilities. Dealing with cases concerning everything from armed robbery and sexual assault to drug addiction, abuse, and foster care, Wiseman approaches each moment with his trademark respect for his chosen subject. Imbued with remarkably instinctual cinematography, rife with poignant imagery–a piece of tissue sticking to a young girl’s eye as she attempts to wipe the tears away, a badly burned young boy’s pained whisper as he tries to answer sensitive questions–and expertly crafted, Juvenile Court is a captivating document of the devastatingly human turmoil and confusion that finds its home in the supposedly ordered courtroom.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1973, 16mm, 144 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Primate

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10/15 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Wiseman’s visit to the Yerkes National Primate Research Center is a meticulous study of the processes used to test and document the behavior of various apes, including orangutans, chimps, and gorillas. Equal parts interspecies anthropological study and a slow-cooking horror-show, you’re just as likely to smile at nurses giving baby chimps little milk bottles and changing their diapers as you are to gasp at the harvesting of a gibbon’s brain. Wiseman balances long takes of surgery and observation with quick close-ups of the various instruments and machines used, representing increasingly experimental (think mad-scientist) procedures in excruciating detail, without sacrificing the sense of elapsed time.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1974, 16mm, 105 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Welfare

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10/22 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Welfare sees Frederick Wiseman’s steadfast gaze focus in on the operations of a single Manhattan government assistance office, right in the thick of the notoriously hard times that characterized New York City in the 1970s. When the needy (many desperately so) who line up in the early hours of the morning finally get a chance to speak with a government worker, a seemingly infinite maze of regulations comes into focus. Wiseman’s camera situates itself at the interface point between the office’s employees and visitors, attending to painfully drawn-out conversations that attempt to translate basic needs into line items–a Sisyphean task that often seems to reach no resolutions–as both parties become more deeply mired in the system’s bureaucracy.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1975, 16mm, 167 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Meat

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10/29 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Much like his earlier High School, Frederick Wiseman’s Meat is essentially concerned with the dehumanizing forces within certain North American institutions. On the surface, Meat is simply its title, but digging a bit deeper reveals a film concerned with the death of the Old West and a look at the myth of masculinity’s role in the workplace, punctuated by quiet moments of reprieve tinged in surrealism and brutality, like a goat leading a flock of sheep to their demise or a circle of steer heads on a line of hooks. Going predictably full-circle, Meat follows the industrial production from livestock to grocery store, the business side of meat manufacturing, and workers’ struggles and budget concerns. With inevitably stomach-turning footage of the process of transforming an animal from a living thing into a product, Wiseman locks his gaze on the simultaneously visceral and exhaustive process.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1976, 16mm, 112 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Sam Green & Yo La Tengo Live Score: The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller (Off-site at the Skirball)

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11/10 - 8PM
$50 GA, $75 VIP

Presented by Skirball Cultural Center

Experience “live documentary” with Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Sam Green and legendary indie rock band Yo La Tengo at this very special one-night only event in the Skirball’s intimate 300-seat Ahmanson Ballroom. The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller traces the career of twentieth-century futurist, architect, inventor, and author R. Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983). An early proponent of environmental stewardship, Fuller spoke persuasively about contemporary design and architecture’s ability to tackle issues of sustainability and conservation and to stimulate radical societal change. Green’s live narration is accompanied by Yo La Tengo performing their original score on stage.

“A singular experience, and a collective one, with the potential for human connection and human error.” – The New York Times

“…A movie being born as you see it and hear it, as alive as music.” – Rebecca Solnit

Advance Tickets for Cinefamily members only
$50 General Admission
$75 VIP Premium

As Cinefamily is a non-profit, we rely on the support of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members. Because we appreciate your support, we have one of the most generous member benefit plans around. Our members receive free admission to regular Cinefamily screenings, priority entry to free shows, and exclusive discount offers to special events such as this one.

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