Belladonna of Sadness (7/23)

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7/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

All Of Them Witches Closing Night Party (Off-site at Basic Flowers)

mderen
7/23 - 8PM
$10/free for members

To cap off our summer of witches, Cinefamily invites you to an All Of Them Witches closing night party at Basic Flowers gallery (242 S Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90012)! Join us for an encore screening of our Witch’s Brew mixtape–a rare and archival cauldron of incantations and ephemera–featuring Maya Deren’s Witch’s Cradle with a live score by Tonos (Elaine Carey from Telecaves).

We’ll have soothsayers and seers of all types on hand to lead us on a curated tour of the occult, guided by the spiritual descendants of medieval witches and psychics of lore. DJ sets by Geneva Jacuzzi and Josh Da Costa (of Regal Degal) and a midnight set by Nephila (Shannon Kennedy of Pedestrian Deposit). Occult evening wear strongly encouraged!

8pm: doors

9pm: Witch’s Brew mixtape, “Witch’s Cradle” with live score by Tonos

Midnight: Nephila (Shannon Kennedy of Pedestrian Deposit)

Tickets available at the door, Rolling Admission

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Fantastic Planet (New 2k Restoration!)

fantasticplanet
7/23 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Live set from DJ Mark Ayala

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg). Following the screening, join us for a Sauvage Soirée on the patio!

The feature presentation will be preceded by Laloux’s short film, Les Escargots.

Les Escargots Dir. René Laloux, 1965, Digital Presentation, 11 minutes
Fantastic Planet Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

WRATH: The Miracle Woman

miraclewoman3
7/24 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

The second of five collaborations between Frank Capra and Barbara Stanwyck, The Miracle Woman is vigorously powered by Stanwyck’s forceful presence… and her WRATH. Enraged by the lack of respect her minister father receives, even on the occasion of his death, Stanwyck’s character renounces religion right off the bat—immediately signaling that, yes, we are truly in a Pre-Code film—and starts conspiring with a con man to invent a new persona for herself, the titular “Miracle Woman.” In love with a blind man and an inspiration to the masses, the Miracle Woman masquerades as a miracle-maker with abandon, but she’s not as happy-go-lucky as her charming personality suggests. To wit, the money-hungry conspirator she’s teamed up with adds a much darker layer to the film, edging his starlet closer and closer to a fury-fueled demise.

Dir. Frank Capra,1931, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (7/24)

belladonna3_480_309
7/24 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ALL OF THEM WITCHES: The Girl on the Broomstick

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7/24 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

All cooped up for 300 years, bored young sorceress Saxana (Petra Cernocka) illicitly enchants herself into the human realm, only to end up in a mortal high school. When the only way to get home is to procure a hag’s ear, Saxana embarks on her own mystical comedy of errors in which the teachers become rabbits, the principal’s head goes missing, and – worst of all – she keeps getting caught passing notes. With her own sly yet amateur brand of magic, Saxana works spells in pursuit of friendship, mischief, and to get back home to her castle – all girded by a mysterious soundtrack of fuzzy slow-jazz grooves (some of which Petra performs herself!). A fable with plenty of signature Czech charm, dramatic costuming, and tongue-in-cheek humor, The Girl on the Broomstick is a vintage treasure and a staple fantasy adventure for all of them witches out there.

Dir. Václav Vorlícek, 1972, 35mm, 76 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Boy Friend

006_the-boy-friend_theredlist
7/24 - 10PM
$12/free for members

The ‘70s does the ‘20s as West End artistes collide with Cockneys in Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend, the decadent film adaptation of the 1956 pastiche stage musical and the filmmaker’s whimsical follow-up his controversial The Devils. This visually indulgent, no-holds-barred backstage romp marks Twiggy’s first starring role as Theatre Royal’s assistant stage manager Polly who finds herself thrust into the spotlight when the production’s leading lady doesn’t show up for her cue. Lines between fantasy and reality blur and fade as the rinky dink, malfunctioning backdrops under this small proscenium arch evolve into impossible, Busby Berkeley-esque set pieces with oversized, turntable dancefloors and shiny, metallic headdresses donned by fever-dream disco-queen chorus gals. With brief dips into pure fantasy and countless (seriously, we lost track) frenetic tap numbers, The Boy Friend promises an eyeful of delights and an earful of joyful, familiar tunes.

Dir Ken Russell, 1971, 35mm, 137 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (7/25)

belladonna2_480_309
7/25 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Boy Friend

the-boy-friend
7/25 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

The ‘70s does the ‘20s as West End artistes collide with Cockneys in Ken Russell’s The Boy Friend, the decadent film adaptation of the 1956 pastiche stage musical and the filmmaker’s whimsical follow-up his controversial The Devils. This visually indulgent, no-holds-barred backstage romp marks Twiggy’s first starring role as Theatre Royal’s assistant stage manager Polly who finds herself thrust into the spotlight when the production’s leading lady doesn’t show up for her cue. Lines between fantasy and reality blur and fade as the rinky dink, malfunctioning backdrops under this small proscenium arch evolve into impossible, Busby Berkeley-esque set pieces with oversized, turntable dancefloors and shiny, metallic headdresses donned by fever-dream disco-queen chorus gals. With brief dips into pure fantasy and countless (seriously, we lost track) frenetic tap numbers, The Boy Friend promises an eyeful of delights and an earful of joyful, familiar tunes.

Dir Ken Russell, 1971, 35mm, 137 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Fantastic Planet (New 2K Restoration!)

fantasticplanet_480_309
7/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (7/26)

belladonna1_480_309
7/26 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

DKTR Opening Night: "The Colossus Of Destiny: A Melvins Tale" Premiere! With Q + A and short set!

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7/27 - 7:30PM
$25

This event will take place at the Regent Theatre (448 S Main St, Los Angeles, CA 90013). The film will be followed by a Q&A with directors Bob Hannam & Ryan Sutherby and the Melvins, and an intimate set.

The Colossus Of Destiny: A Melvins Tale is a film about a band who have defied all the rules, for over 33 years and counting. Band members King Buzzo and Dale Crover lead us from the Chehalis River in Washington State, down through the Golden Gate of Northern California, until finally settling into the Los Angeles River Basin, with the rest of the world thrown in along the way.

Witness first hand the triumphs and toils, loves and hates, and slows and fasts of a hugely talented and highly influential band. Hear what countless peers, collaborators, understudies, admirers, even haters, have to say about The Melvins, through interviews with Mike Patton, Chris Cornell, Jello Biafra, Gene Simmons, Krist Novoselic, Mark Arm, J. Mascis, Josh Homme, David Yow, and many more.

Dir. Bob Hannam & Ryan Sutherby, 2016, Digital Presentation, 125 min.

Plus a screening of The Melvins Across the USA in 51 Days: The Movie–in 2012 the Melvins set a world record by traveling around the USA, playing all 50 states plus Washington DC in 51 days! This proves it!

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

Possession (35mm restoration!)

possession2
7/27 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Live DJ set by crimsoncreature

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (7/27)

belladonna5_480_309
7/27 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Duelle (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

duelleberto
7/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members


Live DJ set by Mark Wright of Decadanse Soiree

Co-presented by La Collectionneuse
This event will take place off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater, located at 1345 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90026.

“The Girls of Fire,” an incomplete group of films by Jacques Rivette, is undoubtedly one of the most criminally overlooked corners of cinema. Conceived in 1976, the films were inspired as much by the mystical writings of Gerard de Nerval, the arcane origins of Mardi Gras, and certain Hollywood postwar genre films as by magic, ritual and a quest to invent an entirely new form of mise en scène. Join us for an extremely rare screening of the first of these, Duelle. Experience the bewitching Goddess of the Sun (radiant Bulle Ogier) and the Goddess of the Moon (luminous Juliet Berto) as they descend to Earth in search of a magical red diamond that will allow them to extend their stay in the mortal realm. With a glorious orchestration of color, costume, and sinuous, sinister camera moves, Duelle is infused with the occult noir spirit of Mark Robson’s The Seventh Victim and the poetic romanticism of Cocteau’s Knights Of The Round Table (the sole male cast-member is one of his dancers), and exists as one of those rare portals, a movie mirror through which the viewer may glide trembling to an endlessly seductive twilight world of invented myth.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1976, Digital Presentation, 121 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Possession (35mm restoration!)

possession1981_street_fight_scene
7/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Fantastic Planet (New 2K Restoration!)

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7/28 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Fantastic Planet (New 2K Restoration!)

abdlalo
7/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg). Following the screening, join us for a Sauvage Soirée on the patio!

Fantastic Planet Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Possession (35mm restoration!)

tumblr_mawxv4wr3q1qd8uxio1_1280
7/29 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Live DJ set by crimsoncreature

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Possession (35mm restoration!)

maxresdefault-3
7/30 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Syngenor (SYNthetic GENetic Organism)

shockfeature_480_309
7/30 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Rob Schrab (Found Crap, LEGO Movie 2) recreates a local TV creature feature show with SHOCK FEATURE THEATER! Each month, Hostess of the Dark, Mini Coffee, presents a horror film, or just horrible film, complete with vintage commercials, crappy clips, and musical guest The Git Back Gang. In July, SHOCK FEATURE THEATER offers a tale of irresponsible science from 1990: Syngenor (SYNthetic GENetic Organism). A scientist engineers a group of genetically engineered creatures for use as “supersoldiers” to fight U.S. wars in the Middle East. However, things get ugly when the creatures malfunction and turn on their creators. Product of science, nightmare of hell — Syngenor! Featuring Re-Animator’s David Gale.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

GLUTTONY: Hard to Handle

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7/31 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Co-Presented by
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Deep in the drowsy hours of a dance marathon, the opening scene of Mervyn LeRoy’s Hard to Handle prepares us for a string of preposterous and hammy get-rich-quick schemes at the hands of leading man, James Cagney. An oddball aptly named “Lefty,” he’s a fellow who falls wildly in and out of the favor of those around him—especially that of the mother of the woman he repeatedly implores to accept him. Always after some glory and a quick buck, Lefty dreams up schemes like fad diets, never balking at the chance to whip up some false advertisements. Cartoonish antics aside, Cagney’s performance also belies the heaviness and melodrama of the Depression-era culture, a time when a grueling dance contest was not so much about fun and showmanship but about winning that desperately needed prize money.

Dir. Mervyn LeRoy, 1933, 35mm, 78 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans w/ a live score by Rococo Jet

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7/31 - 7PM
$14/free for members

For this live score to F.W. Murnau’s Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans, musical collective Rococo Jet (Nora Keyes, Mira Billotte, Jimi Cabeza De Vaca, Carisa Bianca Mellado, Sean Ellwood, John Scott Perreira, and Rebecca Lynn) will unearth the shadow self behind the mask of persona. One of the most visually sumptuous and emotionally rewarding films from silent Hollywood, Sunrise focuses on the sensitive, easily-swayed Anses (George O’Brien) who falls under the spell of The Woman From the City (Margaret Livingston), a classic vamp who convinces him to run off with her–but only after he murders his innocent wife Indre (Janet Gaynor). German Expressionist techniques lend themselves to a fairytale ride through the tortured mindspace of a man caught between devotion and seduction, marking Sunrise as perhaps the most vibrant of Murnau’s stateside productions, ripe for sonic reinvention.

Dir. F. W. Murnau, 1927, digital presentation, 95 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Possession (35mm restoration!)

possession1981_street_fight_scene
7/31 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Possession (35mm restoration!)

possession1
8/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Fantastic Planet (New 2K Restoration!)

abdlawllou
8/1 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Possession (35mm restoration!)

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8/2 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Capturing the energy generated when two people whose lives are so intensely fused and woven are forcibly split, Possession is an emotional nuclear explosion. If all we were given were its operatic and shamanistic performances by leads Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill, it’s impossible-to-describe music by Andrzej Korzynski, and its masterful, hyper-kinetical ballet of camera choreography — all delivered with the force of a long-suppressed traumatic memory — then Possession would already be the best film about divorce ever filmed. But when the angels and demons of our inner nature are literally incarnated in phantasmagorical form — the kind requiring the talents of Oscar-winning creature FX master Carlo Rambaldi (who, instead of making a cutey-pie “E.T.”, concocts a tentacled Lovecraftian octo-sex-demon) — you have the kind of explosively cathartic and entertaining experience that leads to movie-lover nirvanic bliss. Welcome to Possession, your new favorite movie.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1981, 35mm, 123 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ANIMATION BREAKDOWN: Fantastic Planet (New 2K Restoration!)

abdlaloux
8/3 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Animation Breakdown is back with your favorite blue aliens in the 1973 cult French classic Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor, newly restored by Janus Films. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans—Oms—are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters—Draags—in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to the eerie creature & backgrounds designs of surreal illustrator Roland Topor and the amazing psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, DCP, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Queen of the Underground: The Films of Sarah Jacobson

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8/3 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Before leaving this world all too soon at age 32, Sarah Jacobson left an indelible mark on underground filmmaking as an outspoken feminist proponent of the D.I.Y. ethos. A student of George Kuchar’s unbridled non-conformist enthusiasm, she had the freshly xeroxed news from the underground to back up her 8mm manifestos. Armed with soundtracks featuring the likes of Mudhoney and Heavens to Betsy, Jacobson took her subversive films on the road, producing and promoting them with the help of her cool mom and a network of punk zine tape traders. Her debut, I Was A Teenage Serial Killer, is a raw, angry 19-year-old’s rebel yell for feminist vengeance that gender-flips the slasher movie script with bristling vitality. Her feature, Mary Jane’s Not A Virgin Anymore, visits the world of a punk rock movie theater to tell the story of an intellectual young woman’s sexual awakening. If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to push popcorn with a rogue’s gallery of punks, drunks, poseurs, collector freaks and future best friends, or even if you have, this is your movie. Justly praised by Roger Ebert and Kim Gordon alike, these films are more than just totally 90’s time capsules, they’re also the ultimate cinematic retort to every condescending straight white catcalling male slob you’ve ever gotten mixed up with.

I Was A Teenage Serial Killer, dir. Sarah Jacobson, 1992, 16mm, 27min.
Mary Jane’s Not A Virgin Anymore, dir. Sarah Jacobson, 1997, 16mm, 98min.

PS – Support the Sarah Jacobson Grant fund!

Noroit (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

snapshot_dvd_00.47.10_[2011.03.29_11.15.10]
8/4 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members


Co-presented by La Collectionneuse
This event will take place off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater, located at 1345 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90026.

On a foggy island off the shore of nowhere, in an unnamed 12th Century castle, a merry band of sartorially-inclined pirates coexist outside of relative or urgent time in Jacques Rivette’s adventurous Noroît, the endlessly anachronistic sister film to 1976’s Duelle. The title—a spin on a phrase meaning “the wind from the North West”—is as playful as the bodily improv and unrehearsed performance that drive this singular, sumptuous work, which hinges on ebbing relationships in a predominantly matriarchal collective of thieves. The omnipresent full moon, hanging like the threat of death each night, serves as a visual reminder of the flat, planar time in which Rivette freely experiments with the conventions of both Western theater and kabuki tradition, housed in the arc of a Jacobean revenge tragedy. With live, improvised music as spontaneous as the dynamic and deranged performances from a sublime cast of captivating female leads, this third film in Rivette’s “Dream Cycle” abstracts its narrative beyond verbal expression and into a realm where physical acts are the most potent form of communication.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1976, digital presentation, 145 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Bang! The Bert Berns Story

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8/4 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Q&A moderated by Michael Des Barres

Music meets the Mob in this biographical documentary narrated by Steven Van Zandt. You may have never heard of Bert Berns, but you know the enduring songs he has written and produced: “Twist & Shout”, “Cry to Me”, “Tell Him”, “Piece of My Heart”, “Cry Baby”, “Hang On Sloopy”, “I Want Candy”, “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love”. Berns sessions made legends of Solomon Burke, The Isley Brothers, The Drifters, Ben E. King, Wilson Pickett, Van Morrison, and Neil Diamond, and his songs became chart-topping covers for the likes of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Animals and Janis Joplin. His premature death at 38 cut short a seven-year streak of hits, rooted in his early Brill Building and 1650 Broadway days, through his tenure at Atlantic Records to the formation and success of his own labels Bang Records and Shout Records.

The documentary film BANG! The Bert Berns Story, which had its highly acclaimed World Premiere at SXSW, beats a peripatetic pace through the history of 60s R&B-fueled rock as driven by the man who propelled the most emotive, dynamic and sublime soundtrack of the era. Together with his co-director Bob Sarles, filmmaker Brett Berns brings his late father’s story to the screen with interviews with those who knew him best and rare performance footage. Included in the film are interviews with Cissy Houston, Ronald Isley, Ben E. King, Solomon Burke, Van Morrison, Keith Richards and Paul McCartney.

Dir. Brett Berns & Bob Sarles, 2016, DCP, 94 min.

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

On the Silver Globe (new Polish DCP restoration)

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8/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Restoration courtesy of the Polish Cultural Institute New York

A three-hour spaceman journey straight into the center of Andrzej Zulawski’s poetic heart, On the Silver Globe is the director’s most phantasmagorical film. In 1976, Zulawski embarked on the largest-scale film production in Polish history, and over the course of two intense years, executed an eye-popping, grandiloquent sci-fi epic concerning astronauts who crash-land on the moon and kickstart their own bizarre, primitive society. Sadly, the Polish government deemed the film subversive, shut the production down just before shooting was completed, and destroyed its film print materials, sets, and impossibly lush costumes. Ten years later, using secret footage, Zulawski was able to piece together a version of the film that came as close as possible to his original vision — and the results will defy your mind, as even in its reconstituted form, On the Silver Globe is a true brainquake that effortlessly takes you to dizzying heights, and just keeps on elevating.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1977/1988, DCP, 166 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Rivals

tom-and-jerry
8/6 - 11AM
$10/free for members and kids under 14

Since the beginning of time there have been heroes and their villains, anti-heroes and their foils, cats and the stubborn mice and birds that torment them. From big bad wolves trying to catch their next meal, to best frenemies forced to endure each others company, rivalry is a strong and load-bearing pillar of the Saturday Morning Cartoon world. Toms & Sylvesters and Jerrys & Tweety Birds have proven time and time again that everyone needs a worthy opponent, or even an unworthy one; Rocko has his neighbors the Bigheads, Wile E. Coyote has the Road Runner, and even Maggie Simpson has the baby with one eyebrow. So come and celebrate the time honored tradition of animated animosity with our favorite Saturday Morning rivalries!

Pajamas not mandatory, but encouraged. Complimentary cereal bar with a rotation of the best sugary cereals on the market (featuring our monthly mix) and a cash bar for the grown ups who want their sugar delivered in the form of a mimosa.

On the Silver Globe (new Polish DCP restoration)

on-the-silver-globe
8/6 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Restoration courtesy of the Polish Cultural Institute New York

A three-hour spaceman journey straight into the center of Andrzej Zulawski’s poetic heart, On the Silver Globe is the director’s most phantasmagorical film. In 1976, Zulawski embarked on the largest-scale film production in Polish history, and over the course of two intense years, executed an eye-popping, grandiloquent sci-fi epic concerning astronauts who crash-land on the moon and kickstart their own bizarre, primitive society. Sadly, the Polish government deemed the film subversive, shut the production down just before shooting was completed, and destroyed its film print materials, sets, and impossibly lush costumes. Ten years later, using secret footage, Zulawski was able to piece together a version of the film that came as close as possible to his original vision — and the results will defy your mind, as even in its reconstituted form, On the Silver Globe is a true brainquake that effortlessly takes you to dizzying heights, and just keeps on elevating.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1977/1988, DCP, 166 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

SLOTH: Ladies of Leisure

ladies-of-leisure-02
8/7 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

From the top-floor balcony of a glamorous Manhattan loft, the wealthy, beautiful and slightly drunk bestow confetti and full bottles of liquor on the common man like expensive glass water balloons. Debonair jazz age playboys look like they’ve partied a little too hard by 1930 but for the Ladies of Leisure it’s just another night on the job. Prostitution stories (this one’s thinly veiled–when a man needs a date, she’s the “filler in”) can be seedy or puritanical, but Capra treats his subjects with uncommon dignity and Barbara Stanwyck, in her star-making turn, is so funny, so insightful and so enormously human that every scene becomes a showcase for her sardonic, brazen wit–no matter who she’s with or what’s on the page–and the whole movie pauses for a double-take just when she stumbles in, bumming for a cigarette.

Dir. Frank Capra, 1930, 35mm, 99 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Celine and Julie Go Boating (35mm)

celine-and-julie-go-boating
8/7 - 8PM
$12/free for members


Co-presented by La Collectionneuse

Like a richly-rendered Borges story, Céline and Julie Go Boating is so welcomingly sensual, you’ll be just as tempted to laze in its warm beauty as you will to decipher its labyrinthine puzzles. Jacques Rivette’s gorgeous 1974 exploration of the nature of narrative is one of the most mischievously immersive products of the French New Wave, casually bending time and space, enticing its audience to another realm with its play and luster. Librarian Julie (Dominique Labourier) and cabaret magician Céline (Godard regular Juliet Berto) are the mysteriously linked protagonists who spontaneously form a friendship of the caliber of famous duos from the likes of Daisies and Mulholland Dr; the other realm in question is a Parisian household from a bygone era, revealed in fragmented film-within-a-film memories brought on by magical candies. Rivette’s biggest commercial hit in France, but sadly unreleased on DVD in this country, Céline and Julie is a rarity that demands to be beheld on the big, mesmerizing screen.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1974, 35mm, 193 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

On the Silver Globe (new Polish DCP restoration)

onthesilverglobe_newsite
8/8 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Restoration courtesy of the Polish Cultural Institute New York

A three-hour spaceman journey straight into the center of Andrzej Zulawski’s poetic heart, On the Silver Globe is the director’s most phantasmagorical film. In 1976, Zulawski embarked on the largest-scale film production in Polish history, and over the course of two intense years, executed an eye-popping, grandiloquent sci-fi epic concerning astronauts who crash-land on the moon and kickstart their own bizarre, primitive society. Sadly, the Polish government deemed the film subversive, shut the production down just before shooting was completed, and destroyed its film print materials, sets, and impossibly lush costumes. Ten years later, using secret footage, Zulawski was able to piece together a version of the film that came as close as possible to his original vision — and the results will defy your mind, as even in its reconstituted form, On the Silver Globe is a true brainquake that effortlessly takes you to dizzying heights, and just keeps on elevating.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1977/1988, DCP, 166 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Muriel's Wedding

oDwRGOo
8/9 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

presented by John Early and Claudia O’Doherty

Whether stumbling through her aimless existence in the dead-end town of Porpoise Spit, Queensland or following her supposed “friends” on a vacation to which she was purposely not invited, Toni Collette’s mercilessly romantic, hopelessly awkward Muriel Heslop just can’t catch a break. Her only solace lies in the dream of someday throwing herself an outlandishly glamorous wedding, these overactive flights of fantasy set to the warm, Swede-pop glow of maximally orchestrated, endlessly positive ABBA tunes. With sincere affection for the absurdist journey of misfits Muriel and her newfound friend Rhonda (Six Feet Under’s Rachel Griffiths), Muriel’s Wedding crosses the finish line on the edgier side than most mid-’90s indie comedies–just the way we like our feel-good fare and gelled-up hair here at the theatre. For one night, John Early and Claudia O’Doherty will host a screening of their favorite movie complete with a presentation of artifacts, a scintillating discussion, and a DJ who is only allowed to play ABBA.

Dir. PJ Hogan, 1994, 35mm, 110 min.

'In the Shadow of the Sun' w/ Live Score by Psychic TV

THE-THIRD-EYE_magazine_Derek-Jarman_In-the-shadow-of-the-sun_film
8/10 - 7:30PM
$30

Live set by DJ Totally Abuse

In 1981, artist-cum-stage designer turned experimental filmmaker Derek Jarman strung together a hodgepodge of Super 8 films shot between 1972 and 1975 to create the multi-textural In the Shadow of the Sun, a poetic sequence of its creator’s go-to leitmotifs of mirrors, fires, and dancing bodies in motion, doubly-exposed and primarily tinted with psychedelic light leaks. The original score, provided by industrial noise stalwarts Throbbing Gristle, will receive a live reimagining thanks to legendary experimental group Psychic TV, lead by frequent Jarman collaborator Genesis P-Orridge. In anticipation of the September 2016 release of “Alientist,” P-Orridge and h/er collaborators will join us on the Cinefamily stage to present this entirely refreshed, avant-garde live re-scoring to Jarman’s painterly pastiche.

Dir. Derek Jarman, 1981, digital presentation, 48 min.

Merry-Go-Round (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

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8/11 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members


Co-presented by La Collectionneuse
This event will take place off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater, located at 1345 W 1st St, Los Angeles, CA 90026.

Originally conceived as part of the “Girls of Fire” tetralogy (later retitled Scenes From a Parallel Life), which began with Duelle and Noroît, Merry-Go-Round would ultimately stretch Rivette and all those involved to their limits (Last Tango in Paris’ Maria Schneider eventually walked off set). Described by Rivette as a simple story wherein “two people get together because a third, who has arranged to meet them, does not show up,” Merry-Go-Round feels like waking up from a dream that might have been a nightmare. With periodic interludes to alternate realities and dreamscapes, this sometimes maddeningly circuitous film, posing as an espionage thriller loaded with symbolism and MacGuffins at every turn—mysterious phone calls, anonymous notes, empty graves, sand dunes, and a seemingly endless string of X-marks-the-spots—ultimately reveals itself to be far more interested in the game of looking than resolution itself. Bolstered by Rivette’s perverse version of a Greek chorus (an improv jazz clarinetist and a double bass player), Merry-Go-Round is one of cinema’s greatest experiments.

Dir. Jacques Rivette, 1981, Digital Presentation, 160 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Sidemen: Long Road to Glory

Sidemen_480_309
8/11 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Sidemen : Long Road To Glory is an intimate look at the lives and legacies of three legendary bluesmen; piano player Pinetop Perkins, drummer Willie ‘Big Eyes’ Smith and guitarist Hubert Sumlin, all Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf sidemen. The film captures some of the last interviews and final live performances, before their deaths in 2011. The historic live shows are accompanied by performances and personal insights from many of the blues and rock stars these legendary musicians inspired including; Bonnie Raitt, Gregg Allman, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, Tim Reynolds, Shemekia Copeland, Robby Krieger, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Joe Perry, Joe Bonamassa and Johnny Winter.

Dir. Scott Rosenbaum, 2016, DCP, 77 min.

Watch the trailer!

Multiple Maniacs

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8/12 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Having only directed one feature (Mondo Trasho), Waters’ second film ramps up his efforts of grotesquerie and gleeful debauchery with his unfairly underseen Multiple Maniacs. This brand-new digital restoration from Janus is jam packed with armpit-lickers, puke-eaters, bearded men gleefully touching tongues, bicycle-seat-sniffers, and erotic blasphemy galore, all part of Lady Divine’s Cavalcade of Perversions., This crew of psychotic kidnappers tears around on a seemingly endless reign of joyous terror–until Divine is raped by a gigantic lobster whilst lying in her corpse-strewn bedroom. Chock-full of Dreamland regulars–Mary Vivian Pearce, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Edith Massey, George Figgs, and Cookie Mueller– you won’t want to miss this chance to squirm, scream, vomit, laugh, and celebrate one of the greatest anti-puritanical, anarcho-infused ragers in cinema history.

Dir. John Waters, 1970, DCP Restoration, 91 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Multiple Maniacs

multiplemaniacs2_480_309.jpg
8/13 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Having only directed one feature (Mondo Trasho), Waters’ second film ramps up his efforts of grotesquerie and gleeful debauchery with his unfairly underseen Multiple Maniacs. This brand-new digital restoration from Janus is jam packed with armpit-lickers, puke-eaters, bearded men gleefully touching tongues, bicycle-seat-sniffers, and erotic blasphemy galore, all part of Lady Divine’s Cavalcade of Perversions., This crew of psychotic kidnappers tears around on a seemingly endless reign of joyous terror–until Divine is raped by a gigantic lobster whilst lying in her corpse-strewn bedroom. Chock-full of Dreamland regulars–Mary Vivian Pearce, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Edith Massey, George Figgs, and Cookie Mueller– you won’t want to miss this chance to squirm, scream, vomit, laugh, and celebrate one of the greatest anti-puritanical, anarcho-infused ragers in cinema history.

Dir. John Waters, 1970, DCP Restoration, 91 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Multiple Maniacs

multiplemaniacs3_480_309.jpg
8/14 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Having only directed one feature (Mondo Trasho), Waters’ second film ramps up his efforts of grotesquerie and gleeful debauchery with his unfairly underseen Multiple Maniacs. This brand-new digital restoration from Janus is jam packed with armpit-lickers, puke-eaters, bearded men gleefully touching tongues, bicycle-seat-sniffers, and erotic blasphemy galore, all part of Lady Divine’s Cavalcade of Perversions., This crew of psychotic kidnappers tears around on a seemingly endless reign of joyous terror–until Divine is raped by a gigantic lobster whilst lying in her corpse-strewn bedroom. Chock-full of Dreamland regulars–Mary Vivian Pearce, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Edith Massey, George Figgs, and Cookie Mueller– you won’t want to miss this chance to squirm, scream, vomit, laugh, and celebrate one of the greatest anti-puritanical, anarcho-infused ragers in cinema history.

Dir. John Waters, 1970, DCP Restoration, 91 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Multiple Maniacs

multiplemaniacs4_480_309.jpg
8/15 - 11PM
$12/free for members

Having only directed one feature (Mondo Trasho), Waters’ second film ramps up his efforts of grotesquerie and gleeful debauchery with his unfairly underseen Multiple Maniacs. This brand-new digital restoration from Janus is jam packed with armpit-lickers, puke-eaters, bearded men gleefully touching tongues, bicycle-seat-sniffers, and erotic blasphemy galore, all part of Lady Divine’s Cavalcade of Perversions., This crew of psychotic kidnappers tears around on a seemingly endless reign of joyous terror–until Divine is raped by a gigantic lobster whilst lying in her corpse-strewn bedroom. Chock-full of Dreamland regulars–Mary Vivian Pearce, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Edith Massey, George Figgs, and Cookie Mueller– you won’t want to miss this chance to squirm, scream, vomit, laugh, and celebrate one of the greatest anti-puritanical, anarcho-infused ragers in cinema history.

Dir. John Waters, 1970, DCP Restoration, 91 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Devil (new Polish DCP restoration)

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8/16 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Restoration courtesy of the Polish Cultural Institute New York

Hitting an off-the-charts level of subversive allegory, Zulawski’s second feature is a blood-splattered rampage through a war-charred 1790s Poland that turns the historical epic inside out, and dances on its carcass. Immediately banned in the director’s Communist Poland for over a decade and a half, The Devil writhes with nonstop demonic energy as it follows a nobleman who, after escaping from prison, swan dives into insanity and mass murder. Returning home to his once-rich family—now reduced to savagery—and manipulated by a black-cloaked Satanic stranger at the center of a web of political treachery, the nobleman eventually enacts a Hamlet-like pyrrhic revenge on just about everyone in sight. But The Devil’s most spectacularly intense violence is all emotional, with near-constant outbursts of grief, and desperation of a seizure-like intensity that is downright mesmerizing. You won’t be able to look away, and with the way Zulawski’s gloriously restless camerawork captures all the detail, you’ll never want to.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1972, DCP, 119 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: SHOT! The Psycho-Spiritual Mantra of Rock

shot_mickrock_480_309
8/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Q&A Moderated by Michael Des Barres

SHOT! The Psycho-Spiritual Mantra of Rock is an odyssey into the colorful and bohemian tales of rock ‘n’ roll’s history. A cinematic adventure that delves deep into the mind of one of rock’s greatest living photographers: Mick Rock. Told through the poignant lens of rock ‘n’ roll mythology, icon-maker, psychedelic explorer, poet and custodian of dreams, Mick Rock navigates his story from the glam rock shimmer of London to the snarl of NYC punk, and deep into the new millennium.

Dir. Barnaby Clay, 2016, DCP, 95 min.

The Third Part of the Night (new Polish DCP restoration)

thirdpartofthenight_newsite
8/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Restoration courtesy of the Polish Cultural Institute New York

Emerging right out of the gate with a debut as emotionally potent and stylistically inventive as any of his dazzling later works, Andrzej Zulawski’s masterful fever dream The Third Part of the Night is an elliptical wonder on par with the most mind-stretching intellectual Moebius strips of Tarkovsky and David Lynch. Based on the real-life experiences of Zulawski’s father during the Nazi occupation of Poland, the film follows a fugitive who, after witnessing the murder of his wife and child, is hurled into a life that literally is not his own. Littered with trapdoors, doubles, and wormholes, Zulawski creates a cinematic world on the verge of collapse, where doppelgangers and dread abound alongside the true untold story of a Nazi vaccine laboratory, where Jews and members of the resistance were “employed” as feeders for parasites infected with typhus (thus protecting them from persecution). It’s a history that’s mind-bogglingly fascinating on its own; in Zulawski’s hands, it’s one of the most unique war films ever created.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 1971, DCP, 105 min.

Cosmos

Cosmos_Victória Guerra (front), Jonathan_Genet (r)
8/24 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: A Song For You: The Austin City Limits Story

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8/25 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Packed wall to wall with the greatest music from Texas and beyond, with performances from Willie Nelson, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Ray Charles, Beck, Alabama Shakes, and Radiohead, A Song For You: The Austin City Limits Story is music to the ears of fans everywhere. This film highlights the PBS series’ evolution, proving that after 40 years, ACL is more relevant now than ever before. Featuring interviews with dozens of artists and fans, and untold insights from long-time producer Terry Lickona, A Song For You transcends the TV show and gives audiences a front-row seat and backstage pass to the greatest performances of the longest running music show in television history.

Dir. Keith Maitland, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Cosmos

Andrzej-Zulawski-Cosmos
8/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

A Cat in the Brain (New Restoration!)

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8/26 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

A movie so meta that Wes Craven’s New Nightmare barely seems referential in comparison–Lucio Fulci’s (The Beyond, The New York Ripper) Cat in the Brain showcases this prolific filmmaker’s unerring ability to turn the slimmest thread of a story into an insane, cluster-fuck of a film, filled to the brim with enough blood, sex, despair, sly artistry, and hyper-violence to make the most seasoned gorehound squirm. Instead of crafting a new story, Fulci (playing himself) recycles scenes and ideas from his filmography as a killer stalks and tortures him, restaging moments of terror and carnage that he himself created years before. With indulgent descents into sadomasochism, vivisection, cannibalism, and, naturally, a pinch of Nazism, Cat in the Brain marks one of the strangest, most absurd, worthwhile and messy entries in the canon of Italo-horror cinema.

Dir. Lucio Fulci, 1990, DCP Restoration, 87 min.

The Silent Treatment: A Woman of the World

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8/27 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Featuring live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick!

A chic European countess visits her small-town American cousin and wreaks mayhem with her liberated continental habits, like smoking cigarettes and seducing men of high ranking public office. Pola Negri is very good at imbuing small gestures with explicit suggestions, and, with eyelids perpetually at half-mast, exudes an attractive combination of contempt and boredom. As a reflection of and probably a comment on Negri’s experience with the American public as an exoticized object of controversy, A Woman of the World plays her opulent femme fatale typecast against puritanical Midwestern notions of feminine behavior, her stigmatized romantic independence marked by the black skull tattoo on her forearm. At one point she hunts down the man who’s been slandering her name, and whips it out of the not-completely-unwilling participant–literally, with a bullwhip.

Dir Malcolm St. Clair, 1925, DCP restoration, 70 min.

Cosmos

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8/27 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration w/ Frederick Wiseman in person!)

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8/27 - 7PM
$18/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

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8/28 - 4PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Cosmos

cosmos06
8/28 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

titicutfollies3_480_309
8/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Cosmos

COSMOS_Ausschnitt3-omeu
8/29 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

titicutfollies4_480_309
8/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Cosmos

Cosmos_Victória Guerra (front), Jonathan_Genet (r)
8/30 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Titicut Follies (35mm Restoration!)

titicutfollies1_480_309
8/31 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The first feature-length effort by lawyer-turned-documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, Titicut Follies is a cinéma-vérité portrait of the appalling patient conditions inside Bridgewater State Hospital for the Criminally Insane, a correctional institution in Massachusetts. Over the course of 29 days–what would become the typical amount of time for the filmmaker to spend in each of the American institutions he depicted over the course of his 50 years of filmmaking–Wiseman and his synchronized-sound 16mm camera unflinchingly capture the unsanitary living environment and basic human rights violations nakedly unfolding before him. Banned upon its 1967 release due to questions of ethics and patients’ rights, Titicut never shies away from the painful, harsh realities of existence inside a mental institution, marking newcomer Wiseman almost instantly as the quintessential observational filmmaker of contemporary institutional life in America.

Dir Frederick Wiseman, 1967, 35mm, 84 min.

Cosmos

cosmos5-1600x900-c-default
8/31 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Zulawski’s final film–a begrudgingly apt swan song–follows a freshly-failed law student’s descent into a bed and breakfast’s vortex of pulsating ids. Based on Witold Gombrowicz’s surreal novel of the same name, the story leaps from free-associative monologues (sometimes in the voice of Donald Duck) declaring Sartre a “mistaken crosseye” to an indulgent obsession with a dead sparrow in the woods, as our Byronic protagonist broods around the property, falls in love, and lusts to touch a hairlip. Dense and deliberate, eerie tableau vivants see Zulawski’s characters writhing on the floor in intense episodes of pain/ecstasy, building a mystery–but one that the audience nonetheless may not, and need not, fully parse.

Dir. Andrzej Zulawski, 2015, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Syl Johnson: Any Way the Wind Blows

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9/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Fans of 1960s R&B music know Syl Johnson as an influential African-American artist who cut under-appreciated classics like “Come On Sock It To Me” and “Is It Because I’m Black.” Despite enormous talent and a dynamic stage presence, mainstream success never happened for Syl. He drifted into obscurity while his smooth, sexy-voiced rival Al Green (“Let’s Stay Together”) zoomed to stardom. Syl eventually quit music and opened a chain of fast-food fish restaurants after disco crushed the memory of soul. Story over, right? Not so fast. Payback’s a bitch, and Syl—a righteously aggrieved curmudgeon—took his revenge in a most satisfying way. The opening seconds of his 1967 song “Different Strokes”—primal grunts over a stark drumbeat with Minnie Riperton’s laughter swirling overhead—became one of the most sampled breakbeats in hip-hop, and Syl turned into a litigation machine. And he was a natural! Syl got so much money from RZA and the Wu-Tang Clan that he now calls his home “The House That Wu Built.” While he chased down more people to sue, a new generation of fans discovered his classic records through the reissue record label Numero Group, and Syl’s on-stage career was reborn. With a funky, energetic soundtrack, an original score by Yo La Tengo, and interviews with hip-hop icons RZA, Prince Paul, Jazzy Jay, and Peanut Butter Wolf, this documentary is a buoyant and satisfying celebration of an unsung legend who stuck around around long enough to finally enjoy his redemption.

Dir. Robert Hatch-Miller, 2015, DCP, 85 min.

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

High School (35mm Restoration!)

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9/2 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

highschool2_480_309
9/3 - 3PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

highschool3_480_309
9/4 - 5PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

highschool4_480_309
9/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

highschool_480_309
9/6 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

High School (35mm Restoration!)

highschool2_480_309
9/7 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

The eternally youthful vibes of Otis Redding’s “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” guide us through establishing shots of suburban Philadelphia and onto the campus of Northeast High School, the setting for Wiseman’s sophomore filmmaking effort. From the hip-as-heck teacher who asks her students to tune into the poetry of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Dangling Conversation” to the brutal body politics of a homegrown fashion show, High School captures a day-in-the-life of the students and faculty at an upper-middle-class establishment, wandering from homeroom to the gymnasium to capture—with always-impeccable framing—the microdramas inherent in this most American of institutions.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1968, 35mm, 75 min.

Law and Order

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9/10 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Watching Law & Order, one feels almost as if the black and white 16mm film is the only signifier of time having passed; Wiseman’s attention to the structures of law enforcement and their interaction with race and class seems not to have aged one bit, even 47 years later. The made-for-TV, Emmy-winning doc (best news documentary in 1969) is the filmmaker’s foray into the riots-era Kansas City, MO police department of 1968. As his camera roves, it captures myriad situations that officers are called upon to resolve – some appropriately within their jurisdiction, and others seemingly dumped upon them because civilians didn’t know where else to turn; one such a case is a domestic dispute over child-custody which results in the officer telling the child’s father that he simply must hire a lawyer if anything’s to be done. Wiseman’s hard look at the relations between officers and civilians is sympathetic and genuine, attuned to the limitations of the staid categories of law and order, and the humanity and chaos that spill out of them.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1969, 16mm, 81 min.

Hospital (35mm Restoration!)

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9/16 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

35mm Restoration courtesy of the Library of Congress

In pre-HIPAA 1970, inside the four walls of the Metropolitan Hospital in New York’s East Harlem, Frederick Wiseman made a film that depended on a degree of access to doctors and patients that is unfathomable today. We see overtaxed doctors handle everything from stoned hippies to neglected children to alcoholics–lots of alcoholics. Wiseman’s attentive gaze never leans on simplification, even as he stares stereotypes in the face. Doctors aren’t villains–they’re flawed and overworked, and sometimes they go the extra mile for their patients while other times they discuss lunch alongside deep suffering. The alcoholics and druggies and various other oft-underprivileged patients that burst through the ER doors aren’t villains either– they are people at the mercy of a limited institution for care. This newly restored 35mm print is an invitation into the bowels of a place where the American movie-going public will likely never be invited again.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1970, 35mm, 84 min.

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Ticket to Write: The Golden Age of Rock Music Journalism

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9/22 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Q&A with filmmakers and rock journalist guest panel!

“We were rock stars!” explains former Creem editor Jaan Uhelszki. From 1966-81, music magazines gave counter culture its literary wit—and the writers were as flamboyant as the rock stars. Music critics like Lester Bangs, Richard Meltzer, Ben Fong-Torres, Gene Sculatti, Sandy Pearlman, Susan Whitall, Bill Holdship, and Sylvie Simmons developed followings of thousands of music listeners who loyally read their writing in the pages of Crawdaddy, Rolling Stone, Creem, Circus, Hit Parader, Trouser Press, New York Rocker, Who Put the Bomp, Mojo and countless other zines, alt-weeklies, and student rags. However, when MTV emerged in 1981, the magazines saw their market share collapse as America shifted from print media to cable television—young people wanted their MTV. Follow the rise and fall of the rock n’ roll magazine!

Dir. Raul Sandelin, 2016, Digital Presentation, 85 min.

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

Basic Training

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9/24 - 4PM
$12/free for members

As dozens of plainclothes youth, their hair still long and their blue-jeaned gait still casual, stream out of a bus and into an unmarked building, we are invited to take part in Basic Training, Frederick Wiseman’s immersive portrait of the nine weeks of Army training camp that each new enlisted and drafted recruit must endure. Intense discussions on the ethics of combat precede automatic weapons training, the severity of this message somewhat undone by the ridiculous moral tales in their marching cadences, and a moment of levity during a dental hygiene video. Embedded deeply within the rank-and-file at Fort Knox, Wiseman’s observant camera follows each detail and process as new intakes learn the proper way to scrub a urinal, sergeants hammer through marching drills, and the highest-ranking officers deliver motivational speeches to the impressionable minds that stare a potential Vietnam deployment squarely in the face.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1971, 16mm, 80 min.

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Gary Numan: Android in La La Land

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9/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Android In La La Land is a celebration of a British music-making pioneer and the love story that helped him turn his life around. At the end of the 1970s, Gary Numan found himself to be one of the world’s biggest-selling artists, “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?” and “Cars” were huge hits, no-one had heard, or seen, anyone like him.

Asperger’s syndrome helped forge Numan’s ambition, his music and image, but it brought problems. At a time when the public knew little about the condition, the press labeled him a freak, one paper suggested his parents should have been doctored for giving birth to him. Depression, near bankruptcy and a period in the wilderness followed. Then Numan fell in love with his biggest fan, and married her…

Dir. Steve Read & Rob Alexander, 2016, DCP, 85 min.

Watch the trailer!

Essene

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10/1 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Named after the ascetic community purported to have scribed the Dead Sea Scrolls, Essene finds Wiseman immersed in a Benedictine monastery in rural Michigan, whose members struggle to reconcile their individual idiosyncrasies with the community’s collective needs. He films the brethren in prayer, at study, holding mass, and maintaining the grounds, granted access even to private counseling sessions. In a departure from earlier works, he returns to a few subjects, allowing them to become characters in their own right, including one monk on the brink of a nervous breakdown. Wiseman’s presence is all but invisible here, including one virtuosic 360-degree handheld shot around the abbot in the middle of a mass service.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1972, 16mm, 86 min.

Juvenile Court

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10/8 - 4PM
$12/free for members

An attentive and non-judgemental look at the youth courts system in Memphis, Juvenile Court showcases Wiseman’s inimitable observational abilities. Dealing with cases concerning everything from armed robbery and sexual assault to drug addiction, abuse, and foster care, Wiseman approaches each moment with his trademark respect for his chosen subject. Imbued with remarkably instinctual cinematography, rife with poignant imagery–a piece of tissue sticking to a young girl’s eye as she attempts to wipe the tears away, a badly burned young boy’s pained whisper as he tries to answer sensitive questions–and expertly crafted, Juvenile Court is a captivating document of the devastatingly human turmoil and confusion that finds its home in the supposedly ordered courtroom.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1973, 16mm, 144 min.

Primate

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10/15 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Wiseman’s visit to the Yerkes National Primate Research Center is a meticulous study of the processes used to test and document the behavior of various apes, including orangutans, chimps, and gorillas. Equal parts interspecies anthropological study and a slow-cooking horror-show, you’re just as likely to smile at nurses giving baby chimps little milk bottles and changing their diapers as you are to gasp at the harvesting of a gibbon’s brain. Wiseman balances long takes of surgery and observation with quick close-ups of the various instruments and machines used, representing increasingly experimental (think mad-scientist) procedures in excruciating detail, without sacrificing the sense of elapsed time.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1974, 16mm, 105 min.

Welfare

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10/22 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Welfare sees Frederick Wiseman’s steadfast gaze focus in on the operations of a single Manhattan government assistance office, right in the thick of the notoriously hard times that characterized New York City in the 1970s. When the needy (many desperately so) who line up in the early hours of the morning finally get a chance to speak with a government worker, a seemingly infinite maze of regulations comes into focus. Wiseman’s camera situates itself at the interface point between the office’s employees and visitors, attending to painfully drawn-out conversations that attempt to translate basic needs into line items–a Sisyphean task that often seems to reach no resolutions–as both parties become more deeply mired in the system’s bureaucracy.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1975, 16mm, 167 min.

Meat

meat_480_309
10/29 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Much like his earlier High School, Frederick Wiseman’s Meat is essentially concerned with the dehumanizing forces within certain North American institutions. On the surface, Meat is simply its title, but digging a bit deeper reveals a film concerned with the death of the Old West and a look at the myth of masculinity’s role in the workplace, punctuated by quiet moments of reprieve tinged in surrealism and brutality, like a goat leading a flock of sheep to their demise or a circle of steer heads on a line of hooks. Going predictably full-circle, Meat follows the industrial production from livestock to grocery store, the business side of meat manufacturing, and workers’ struggles and budget concerns. With inevitably stomach-turning footage of the process of transforming an animal from a living thing into a product, Wiseman locks his gaze on the simultaneously visceral and exhaustive process.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1976, 16mm, 112 min.

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