Doug Benson Movie Interruption: Collateral Beauty

CB23832.dng
3/27 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and friends (who in the past have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the couches, mics in hand, and say whatever pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen. This month’s pick is Collateral Beauty!

Dir. David Frankel, 2016, DCP, 97 min.

Prevenge

prevenge-2016-comedy-horror-alice-lowe-graveyard
3/27 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting. A Shudder exclusive.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Watch the trailer!

Kedi (with director Ceyda Torun in person!)

kittens in kedi
3/28 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

In the age of peak cat video saturation, just a tap of the finger is all it takes to gaze into the eyes of an adorable feline or watch an absurd cat gets-in-container situation unfold. But how many of those of videos follow their subjects – traversing a whole city via leading cat-characters?

Hundreds of thousands of cats roam Istanbul freely; they are as integral to the city as the Bosphorus strait and the city’s bazaars, beloved by tourists and locals alike. An incredibly warm, playful story of cats neither wild nor tame – and the people who love them – Kedi is the cat-lover’s new favorite film. Trust us.

Dir. Ceyda Torun, 2016, DCP, 80 min.

Watch the trailer!

Prevenge

Prevengepic1-600x429
3/28 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting. A Shudder exclusive.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Watch the trailer!

Eldorado

Eldorado
3/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“A dance about a piece of music within a film about dance.” -FIAF

With made-for-TV documentary Eldorado, filmmaker Olivier Assayas has completely redefined our expectations of what it means to be awestruck by a piece of art. Assayas’s vibrant, meditative picture pulls back the curtain on the collaborative creative process to reveal two masters of their craft working together toward a common goal: producing an avant-garde, contemporary ballet. His camera and its perfect frames shift between the rehearsal studio of French choreographer Angelin Preljocaj and the recording laboratory of legendary German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen (a mad scientist-level genius who once claimed to have been born on a planet orbiting a nearby star Sirius). Much like the mythical city that gives the ballet – and the film – its name, Assayas has discovered an intangible alchemy between choreographer, composer, and filmmaker. There’s nothing quite like watching commanding innovators speak the same language about distinct artist practices, but Preljocaj and Stockhausen’s synergized revelations – not to mention their remarkably distinct final product, which we are granted the privilege of watching performed in its entirety – make for one of the most captivating documentations of the organic creative process in recent memory.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2008, Digibeta, 102 min.

Prevenge

alice-lowe-in-prevenge
3/29 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting. A Shudder exclusive.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Watch the trailer!

Kedi

9-gamsiz-in-kedi-_lores
3/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

In the age of peak cat video saturation, just a tap of the finger is all it takes to gaze into the eyes of an adorable feline or watch an absurd cat gets-in-container situation unfold. But how many of those of videos follow their subjects – traversing a whole city via leading cat-characters?

Hundreds of thousands of cats roam Istanbul freely; they are as integral to the city as the Bosphorus strait and the city’s bazaars, beloved by tourists and locals alike. An incredibly warm, playful story of cats neither wild nor tame – and the people who love them – Kedi is the cat-lover’s new favorite film. Trust us.

Dir. Ceyda Torun, 2016, DCP, 80 min.

Watch the trailer!

Donnie Darko Off-Site at Vista (with Richard Kelly in person!)

01100001
3/30 - 10PM
$14/free for members

Brand new restoration with director Richard Kelly in person! Off-site at The Vista (4473 Sunset Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027).

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 113 min.

Prevenge

prevenge-2016-alice-lowe
3/30 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting. A Shudder exclusive.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Watch the trailer!

Kedi

kedi2
3/31 - 7PM
$12/free for members

In the age of peak cat video saturation, just a tap of the finger is all it takes to gaze into the eyes of an adorable feline or watch an absurd cat gets-in-container situation unfold. But how many of those of videos follow their subjects – traversing a whole city via leading cat-characters?

Hundreds of thousands of cats roam Istanbul freely; they are as integral to the city as the Bosphorus strait and the city’s bazaars, beloved by tourists and locals alike. An incredibly warm, playful story of cats neither wild nor tame – and the people who love them – Kedi is the cat-lover’s new favorite film. Trust us.

Dir. Ceyda Torun, 2016, DCP, 80 min.

Watch the trailer!

Donnie Darko (with Richard Kelly in person!)

01100006
3/31 - 9PM
$14/free for members

Brand new restoration with director Richard Kelly in person!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 113 min.

April Fool's Day (w/ director Fred Walton & cast in person!)

image-w1280
3/31 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Before Scream knocked the genre into the realm of post modernism, Fred Walton’s April Fool’s Day was the definitive deconstruction of the slasher film. Riding high on a cresting wave of holiday-themed killers, Walton’s film is a deft comedy with enough scares and kills to satisfy horror fans while also boasting production values that far exceed most low budget fare of the era. Also surprising is the cast of notables; Deborah “Valley Girl” Foreman, Amy “Friday the 13th Part 2″ Steele, Thomas “Back to the Future” Wilson and Ryan O’Neal’s son Griffin who was later convicted for manslaughter in the death of Francis Ford Coppola’s son! A rollicking genre-bender with a killer twist, this 80s classic demands to be celebrated every April 1st, so don’t be a fool – join us!

Dir. Fred Walton, 1986, 35mm, 89 min.

Watch the trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: April Fool's Day

SMC: April Fool's Day
4/1 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

This month, Saturday Morning Cartoons celebrates our favorite tricksters and fools, mischief makers and jesters! From the classic to the contemporary, cartoons can be crazy. For April Fool’s Day, join us to celebrate the insanity! We’ll watch the most cartoonish of cartoons with a swan-dive straight into the heart of some surreal animated worlds – featuring ‘toons that jest, joke, and bend reality.

Complimentary cereal bar. Pajamas encouraged.

Who's Crazy?

whoscrazycouple
4/1 - 3:30PM
$12/free for members

It doesn’t get more underground than this 1966 feature-length free-jazz freakout, which stars members of the legendary avant-garde Living Theatre group and features an ecstatic score by the late, great Ornette Coleman. Whispered about for decades, Who’s Crazy? finally re-emerged last year thanks to the dedicated sleuthing of an Ornette obsessive, who tracked the sole print in the director’s shed. Making its West Coast debut after 50 years – and not a second too late – the mostly-improvised film offers a heavy dose of mid-60s collective psychosis, unleashing a busload of lunatic hepcats on a sleepy Belgian countryside for a sustained bout of unstructured merrymaking. As their neo-dadaist hijinks escalate to the fever pitch of pagan ritual, Coleman matches their frenzy, laying down an emancipatory racket on saxophone, trumpet and violin. Like the best work of Warhol, Jack Smith or the Kuchars, it’s as much a happening as a film, with filmmaker Thomas White (al)chemically summoning spontaneous lunacy from his inspired collaborators.

Dir. Thomas White, 1966, DCP, 73 min.

Watch the trailer!

Kedi

kamil in kedi
4/1 - 5:30PM
$12/free for members

In the age of peak cat video saturation, just a tap of the finger is all it takes to gaze into the eyes of an adorable feline or watch an absurd cat gets-in-container situation unfold. But how many of those of videos follow their subjects – traversing a whole city via leading cat-characters?

Hundreds of thousands of cats roam Istanbul freely; they are as integral to the city as the Bosphorus strait and the city’s bazaars, beloved by tourists and locals alike. An incredibly warm, playful story of cats neither wild nor tame – and the people who love them – Kedi is the cat-lover’s new favorite film. Trust us.

Dir. Ceyda Torun, 2016, DCP, 80 min.

Watch the trailer!

Donnie Darko (with Richard Kelly in person!)

01100003
4/1 - 8:45PM
$14/free for members

Brand new restoration with director Richard Kelly in person!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 113 min.

Pink Floyd: The Wall

pink floyd the wall
4/1 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Presented in conjunction with Fight the Power!

Holy shit, ‘Floyd fans – if you’ve never seen Pink Floyd: The Wall, now’s the time to take the pill; as the film is more than a video album, more than a rock operetta, more than the sticky makeout party known as Laser Floyd at the Science Center. Director Alan Parker takes classic-rock-giant Pink Floyd’s eleventh (and most contentious) studio album and adds dimension after visual dimension to its iconic composition, slowly revealing the plummeting and heartbreaking internal depths of The Wall’s unexplored stories.

Following young Pink through a childhood of turmoil and hostility, The Wall is a visually rich yet morally devoid bildungsroman of mounting anxiety, as Pink struggles for connection and expression in an uncaring, violent world. Written by Roger Waters, based on the life of rock ‘n roll’s arguable persephone Syd Barrett, and rife with psychedelia, the film hypnotizes us deeply into the psychological sub-terrains of a soul’s disconnection from society – in only the way Waters can be our Virgil. With animation by Gerald Scarfe that brings an interplanar breadth to this sludgy, woeful musical epic of postwar algos, Waters has crafted a crucial forewarning – perhaps now more relevant than ever – of the psychosis of a human kept behind a wall.

Dir. Alan Parker, 1983, 35mm, 95 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Who's Crazy?

whoscrazystill
4/2 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Jazz 45s set by Adam Hayden aka Mean Mr. Mustard

It doesn’t get more underground than this 1966 feature-length free-jazz freakout, which stars members of the legendary avant-garde Living Theatre group and features an ecstatic score by the late, great Ornette Coleman. Whispered about for decades, Who’s Crazy? finally re-emerged last year thanks to the dedicated sleuthing of an Ornette obsessive, who tracked the sole print in the director’s shed. Making its West Coast debut after 50 years – and not a second too late – the mostly-improvised film offers a heavy dose of mid-60s collective psychosis, unleashing a busload of lunatic hepcats on a sleepy Belgian countryside for a sustained bout of unstructured merrymaking. As their neo-dadaist hijinks escalate to the fever pitch of pagan ritual, Coleman matches their frenzy, laying down an emancipatory racket on saxophone, trumpet and violin. Like the best work of Warhol, Jack Smith or the Kuchars, it’s as much a happening as a film, with filmmaker Thomas White (al)chemically summoning spontaneous lunacy from his inspired collaborators.

Dir. Thomas White, 1966, DCP, 73 min.

Watch the trailer!

Kedi

kedi3
4/2 - 7PM
$12/free for members

In the age of peak cat video saturation, just a tap of the finger is all it takes to gaze into the eyes of an adorable feline or watch an absurd cat gets-in-container situation unfold. But how many of those of videos follow their subjects – traversing a whole city via leading cat-characters?

Hundreds of thousands of cats roam Istanbul freely; they are as integral to the city as the Bosphorus strait and the city’s bazaars, beloved by tourists and locals alike. An incredibly warm, playful story of cats neither wild nor tame – and the people who love them – Kedi is the cat-lover’s new favorite film. Trust us.

Dir. Ceyda Torun, 2016, DCP, 80 min.

Watch the trailer!

Donnie Darko

01100009
4/2 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand new restoration of the director’s cut!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 134 min.

Donnie Darko

01100042
4/3 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand new restoration!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 113 min.

1984

1984-john-hurt
4/4 - 7:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

In an age of alternative facts and challenges to civil liberties, together we must now do the daunting work of remembering a world that gave way to the infamous Big Brother, and what fate belied those who questioned Him. Please join The Cinefamily – and almost 90 other independent theaters across North America – on April 4th, 2017, as we screen this necessary and unflinching work in solidarity with those like Winston Smith (the late John Hurt), who love – and in loving, resist.

An eminent work like “1984,” oft-memed darling of English classes everywhere, is brought to a bleak apotheosis in Michael Radford’s (yes,1984) film adaptation. With its rote violence, its paralyzing portrayals of Orwell’s two-way telescreens – from which both public praise and hangings are administered ad insanium – and a palate that invokes only mud, we become privy and then prisoner to the normalization of a humanity traumatized by power. As Richard Burton – in his final performance, as INGSOC Party brainwasher O’Brien – taunts, “‘If you want a vision of the future … imagine a boot stamping on a human face forever.’”

Dir. Michael Radford, 1984, digital presentation, 113 min.

Tickets: Free w/ RSVP (first-come, first-serve). Donation to the ACLU suggested.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Also, as Cinefamily is a non-profit, all of our donating 1-year Black Card members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Donnie Darko

01100001
4/4 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand new restoration of the director’s cut!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 134 min.

Donnie Darko

01100006
4/5 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Brand new restoration!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 113 min.

Tickling Giants (Off-site at the Vista, w/ Sara Taksler, Bassem Youssef, and Larry Wilmore in person!)

TICKLINGGIANTS_032
4/5 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This show will take place at the Vista, located at 4473 Sunset Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

“If your regime is not strong enough to handle a joke, then you don’t have a regime.”

Followed by a Q&A moderated by Larry Wilmore (The Daily Show, The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, Black-ish)!

The Daily Show producer Sara Taksler’s exuberant, prescient doc follows the rise and fall of Bassem Youssef – “Egypt’s Jon Stewart.” Leaving a successful career as a cardiac surgeon, Youssef brought satire to Egypt in the throes of the Arab Spring, with his show (Al-Bernameg aka “The Show”) which regularly drew 30 million views – to put that in perspective, we’re talking about 40% of the population of Egypt. The charismatic Youssef waged a fight for free speech that is – unfortunately – still extremely fraught.

Dir. Sara Taksler, 2016, DCP, 111 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Donnie Darko

01100042
4/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Brand new restoration of the director’s cut!

“And finally, I looked in the mirror. Not just in the mirror. I looked through the mirror. In that image, I saw my ego reflection.”

The Last Temptation of Christ for Reagan-era suburbia, Richard Kelly’s Donnie Darko breathes anew with every generation exposed to it. A box office flop upon initial release, it became a rousing word of mouth success on the home video market, making it truly one of the last “cult” films of its time – and a metaphysical midnight movie for the ages. Hours before a jet engine mysteriously crashes through his room, a sleepwalking teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) receives an end times prophecy from a demented looking 6-foot tall bunny named “Frank.” Cult-like infomercials and chest-bound wormholes are spliced with encounters with high school bullies as the film careens between sci-fi tripper and coming of age love story – aka My Girl meets The Dead Zone. Newly restored!

Dir. Richard Kelly, 2001, DCP, 134 min.

Adalen 31 (encore!)

adalen 31
4/9 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“Widerberg tells the film as gracefully as the impressionist painters” – Olivier Assayas

Bo Widerberg’s Adalen 31 is a seminal work by one of Sweden’s most seminal filmmakers. Winner of a Special Jury prize at Cannes in 1969, it is a gorgeous ode to the workers who striked, struggled, in some cases died in the 1931 Adalen Riots – a historical confrontation between the military and labour demonstrators that ended in tragedy, but paved the way for worker’s rights in the following century. Widerberg is sometimes called the anti-Bergman, because he is more concerned with man’s relationship with his fellow man, than his relationship with God. Serious as the subject is, Widerberg finds charm and humanity in the day to day lives of his town of sawmill workers, who must while away the weeks, hungry and out of work, waiting for a new era to come. By finding a light touch – with cinematic grace galore – Widerberg transmits the emotional power of their struggle with strength. Shown in 35mm, with an imported print from the Swedish Film Institute.

Dir. Bo Widerberg, 1969, 35mm, 110 min.

Sans Soleil

unnamed
4/9 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“The first image he told me about was of three children on a road in Iceland, in 1965. He said that for him it was the image of happiness and also that he had tried several times to link it to other images, but it never worked. He wrote me: one day I’ll have to put it all alone at the beginning of a film with a long piece of black leader; if they don’t see happiness in the picture, at least they’ll see the black.”

And so begins the legendary epistolary film that is Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil. While dispatches from Japan and Guinea-Bissau – written by a Sandor Krasna (an alter-ego for Marker himself) – are read aloud, this spellbinding travelogue-cum-philosophical inquiry traverses the nature of time, memory, and history. Tender recollections take us from a temple consecrated to cats to the lunar landscapes of Iceland, from the depths of psychedelic video art to the mysteries of Hitchcock’s Vertigo. With irrepressible curiosity and a tinge of melancholy, this is filmmaking that truly quickens the heart – screening on a gorgeous 35mm print.

Dir. Chris Marker, 1983, 35mm, 100 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Do the Right Thing

do the right thing
4/12 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Presented in conjunction with Fight the Power!

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for Do the Right Thing.

Da Mayor: Always do the right thing.
Mookie: That’s it?
Da Mayor: That’s it.
Mookie: I got it, I’m gone.

Greg sez: Spike Lee’s sensitive, perceptive, funny, horrifying masterpiece about race, bigotry and humanity. From the opening titles with Rosie Perez furiously dancing to Public Enemy we are off to the races. The hottest day of the summer is when Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn boils over. Mookie works for Sal the Italian guy who has fed the neighborhood pizza for years. But everyone is not happy with the state of race, sex, the white heroes on the wall, and especially – justice. When the white cops arrive the end of the day to, it all explodes in a terrifying climax. Sal’s becomes the epicenter of a neighborhood dealing with all the issues we will find so pertinent in the age of Mango Mussolini and his white supremacist administration. Great performances all around and a great cast. Get down and laugh, get down and cry, get up and organize. This movie is the real deal. Come and open your mind. We are all brothers and sisters.

Dir. Spike Lee, 1989, 35mm, 120 min.

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life
4/14 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

Three Ages (new restoration!)

three ages
4/15 - 2PM
$12/free for members

One of the earliest Keaton features, Three Ages uses the multi-part structure of D.W. Griffith’s epic Intolerance both as a form of parody, and for practical reasons. At the time, it was unproven whether or not Buster could successfully wear multiple hats (writing, directing and acting) on a feature film, so should the venture have tanked, it was deliberately built so that it could be cut and re-distributed into three separate two-reelers, a form he had already conquered. In the film, Buster plays a young man in competition for a lady’s hand, in a story told across three time periods: the Stone Age, the Roman Empire and the present day. It was also the first film to use the talents of Keaton’s loyal staff of comedy writers, who would remain with him throughout most of the ‘20s. Lucky for us, its modest success paved the way for an extraordinary string of almost a dozen more silent features from Keaton before the end of the decade.

Dirs. Buster Keaton & Eddie Cline, 1923, DCP, 111 min.

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life 01
4/15 - 7PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

Get High Watch Wrestling with Ron Funches & X-Pac

unnamed (1)
4/15 - 9:30PM
$20

Comedian Ron Funches and pro wrestling icon Sean “X-Pac” Waltman get high, watch and make fun of classic and modern wrestling matches with a group of famous friends. Join us!!!!

Wild in the Streets

wild in the streets
4/15 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“America’s greatest contribution has been to teach the world that getting old is such a drag.”

Imagine… POTUS Jim Morrison, “peace and Love” re-education camps for everybody over 30, and mandatory LSD consumption for all. With baby boomers making up the majority of America, it’s more possible than you might think! A 22 year old millionaire rock singer (who makes his own LSD) works to lower the voting age to 15 and major changes ensue, in this savvy satire of the clashes between generations and the boom of 60s youth culture. Along with the drive-in classics The Trip and Psych-Out, this is another American International Pictures (AIP) counterculture cash-in, and written by Robert Thom, who, with his acerbic purple prose, was one of the most talented and entertaining players on the AIP payroll. With Oscar nominated editing, an eclectic cast including Hal Holbrook, Shelley Winters, Dick Clark, Ed Begley and Richard Pryor, and minor hit single “Shape of Things To Come,” Wild in the Streets is an absurd, campy time capsule. Or a sign of what’s to come…

Dir. Barry Shear, 1968, 35mm, 97 min.

David Lynch: The Art Life

1000
4/16 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life
4/17 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life 01
4/18 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

1000
4/19 - 11PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

David Lynch: The Art Life

the art life
4/20 - 5PM
$12/free for members

“My boyhood was See Spot Run. Elegant old homes, tree-lined streets, the milkman, building backyard forts, droning airplanes, blue skies, picket fences, green grass, cherry trees. It was a dream world – Middle America as it’s supposed to be. But on the cherry tree, there’s this pitch oozing out – some black some yellow, and millions of red ants crawling all over. I discovered that if one looks a little closer at this beautiful world, there’s always red ants underneath.” – David Lynch

Sketching and smoking in his home studio, David Lynch – a lifelong artist whose fixation on the concept of moving, audible paintings begat arguable cinematic masterstrokes like Eraserhead and Mulholland Drive – credits not his “normal” childhood, but the mysterious sensations and surreal encounters within it, as coloring a lifetime of the work we know well: one that explores, challenges, subverts (and yet, celebrates), the inherent darkness within American normalcy. As textural and synesthetic as a Lynch film itself, David Lynch: The Art Life is the rare artist’s biography that lets the subject – and his eerie and thrilling visual art – speak for itself.

Dir. Jon Nguyen, 2016, DCP, 90 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Apple

theapple
4/22 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Set in “1994”, this absurd-o Biblical allegory concerns the perils of a young couple discovered by an all-powerful fascistic funk band’s Satanic manager, who exploits them for his own ungodly gain. If that already sounds like a hoot, toss into the mix henchmen, bad accents, chorus-girl firing squads, circus acts, disco odes to amphetamines, hippies, sequined jockstraps, kvetching yentas, clothed orgies, Carpenters rip-offs, flying Cadillacs and a jivin’ production number set in the depths of Hell — all brought to you by director Menahem Golan, also responsible for Over The Top and The Delta Force!

“Only The Apple has the audacity to dream up a future where a Lou Pearlman-like Svengali is as powerful as Josef Stalin, and disco’s bleary hedonism not only survived the ’70s, but grew in strength and power until it conquered the world.” – The AV Club

Dir. Menahem Golan, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Privilege

privilege
5/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“A rock concert is in fact a rite involving the evocation and transmutation of energy. Rock stars may be compared to priests.” – William Burroughs

The first narrative feature from documentary director Peter Watkins (The War Game, Punishment Park), Privilege is a verité-style projection of the near-future 1970s, greatly influenced by direct cinema classic Lonely Boy. Starring Manfred Mann’s Paul Jones, the film projects a future where corporate commercialism, pop music, organized religion, and state-controlled nationalism come together to manipulate the minds of teeny-boppers. Featuring surreal TV commercials, a Franciscan Monk garage band, and a rock concert/political rally packed with kids chanting “we will conform,” Privilege is a surreal, chilling meeting of Triumph of the Will and Top of the Pops.

Dir. Peter Watkins, 1967, 35mm, 103 min.

Born in Flames (w/ Lizzie Borden in person!)

Brody-Political-Passions-of-Born-in-Flames
5/12 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Presented by Women of Cinefamily

Preserved by Anthology Film Archives with restoration funding by The Hollywood Foreign Press Association and The Film Foundation.

On the tail end of one revolution and the eve of the next, two feminist pirate radio stations (“Radio Ragazza” and “Phoenix Radio”) broadcast commentary on the failing socialist state from a future utopian/dystopian New York, where the dream of the left’s takeover has come and gone. Lizzie Borden’s stellar and ferociously beloved documentary-style sci-fi social drama, restored by Anthology Film Archives, envisions an imagined future that upon contemporary viewing looks almost—but not quite—like the past, eerily affecting even beyond its time-capsule appeal. Circling around issues of race, gender, and class that apparently never get old, Born In Flames is revolutionary beyond its political narrative. Shot on a shoestring over a period of five years, using non-actors and little in the way of an advance script, it feels like a feat, carried to completion by the sheer force of ideas and passion.

Dir. Lizzie Borden, 1983, 35mm, 80 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

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