The Five Minutes Game: 2017 Edition

5 minutes game
5/29 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Summer’s around the corner, and you know how we here at the theater love two things in tandem: busting out the patio grill, and The Five Minutes Game. What’s all this about a game, you ask? We’re firm believers in “every movie is interesting for at least its first five minutes,” those fascinating moments when you’re still entering the new world a film presents you, and trying to figure out what the hell’s going on. We’ll choose fifteen movies you’ve likely never seen before (with most of them still unavailable on DVD), line ‘em up and only show you the first five minutes of each (excluding the opening credits). Then you, the audience, will vote on which film to watch in its entirety. So bring something to cook on our grill and let’s get started!

5:00-6:30PM – The Five Minutes Game!
6:30-7:30PM – we tally the votes and BBQ on the patio!
7:30-9:00PM – we watch the winning film!

Love & Anarchy (newly restored!)

love & anarchy
6/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Set in a masterfully art-directed, palazzo-style Roman brothel, Italian auteur Lina Wertmüller’s seventh feature begins railing off raunchy dialogue at the pace of a Robert Altman film, yet finds itself, finally, in the same thematic waters as weighty wartime meditations like All Quiet on the Western Front or The Battle of Algiers. Throw in some torchy Italian folk interludes and you’ve got Love & Anarchy, which blends a fish-out-of-water tale of sex and romance in the big city with a serious examination of the ways in which individual humanity becomes submerged by political imperative. Wertmüller regulars Giancarlo Giannini and Mariangela Melato, appearing as a farmer and prostitute conspiring to assassinate Benito Mussolini, once again display an uncanny talent for pulling from a grab bag of moods and affectations—from the brash pitch work of the bordello foyer to the righteous conviction of the politically persecuted. It’s fast-firing, hilarious stuff, and when the narrative pitch turns anxious and eventually abject in the film’s final act, the full weight of this radical undertaking will hit you like a ton of bricks.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1973, DCP, 124 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Mystery Meat

Mystery-Meat-web-listing-question
6/1 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

From Cinefamily’s very beginnings, one of our greatest loves has been the joy of discovery — the extreme curio factor — the “what the hell am I watching?!” feeling that envelops us like a cocoon whenever we stumble across celluloid of unknown artistic origins. Running Cinefamily brings a game of limitations, though — in particular, what we’re doing is intended for an “audience.” But what about the films made for no one? The ones we want to show “just because”? And what about the ones we’ve never even seen ourselves, but sound so out-there that we simply must screen them, just to find out – films too difficult to parse from their flaws, too confusing, too challenging, or just too damn strange. It’s all part of the fun.

We don’t promise these films will be “good.” We offer them with no explanations, no justifications, no apologies, and no refunds. And we won’t even tell you what they are. Welcome to Mystery Meat.

Warning: These screenings are not for civilians.

Vintage Sci-Fi Anime Party

vlcsnap-2017-05-22-13h40m03s167
6/2 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Of all the galaxies far, far away, sci-fi anime of the 70s and 80s inhabits one that’s particularly fuzzy, fantastical and forever embedded in the hearts of many. One of those hearts belongs to Xavier the Spaniard, ABD’s youngest programmer, a lifelong, obsessive devotee of the genre. Alas, our Spaniard must soon return to Spain – but not before leaving us with his love letter to Japanese animated space operas: The Vintage Sci-Fi Anime Party! Prepare yourself for epic space battles, giant robot show downs, sentai and mecha madness, and monstrous extraterrestrial foes – all brought to you by masters like Osamu Tezuka, Rintaro, and Katsuhiro Otomo. Not to mention Hayao Miyazaki’s first TV incursions, macho Philip K. Dickian masterpieces like Space Adventure Cobra, and King Beast GoLion, the action-packed anime that transformed into beloved cult-fave Voltron.

Come join our late night celebration of subtitle-bejeweled intergalactic adventures from the golden age when anime first reached western shores, and bid adios to Xavier before he takes off for his home planet!

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Greatest Bad Guys

meet the beat alls
6/3 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

Hello boys and girls! Join us this month as we showcase our favorite cartoon baddies; mad scientists, cranky western gunslingers, absent minded hunters, and peg legged Pete’s are essential to the stories we love and grew up with. What would Popeye be without Bluto? How boring would the Powerpuff Girls be without Mojo Jojo? Without Dr. Claw, Inspector Gadget is useless! Cartoon heroics simply couldn’t exist without cartoon villainy.

Join us as we celebrate the unsung heroes of the bad guy world. Complimentary cereal bar. Pajamas encouraged.

The Captive

the captive
6/3 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Premiere of a new restoration!

Featuring live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick

Long believed to be lost, Cecil B. Demille’s The Captive has been recently restored by the archival team at Paramount. A romantic melodrama set during the Balkan Wars, the screenplay was co-written with Jeanie Macpherson (who also wrote the play on which the film was based and even has a supporting role in the film). In Montenegro, a young woman (Blanche Sweet)’s life is occupied by family obligations until a captured Turk nobleman and prisoner of war enters her life – throws the film into the realm of love story, all while the war rages on around them. Join us for this very rare screening!

Dir. Cecil B. DeMille, 1915, digital presentation, 50 min.

The Seduction of Mimi (newly restored!)

seduction of mimi
6/3 - 5PM
$12/free for members

A massive international hit, The Seduction of Mimi is the film in which Wertmüller found her style, a unique brew of outrageous adult grotesquerie and sexual-political satire, making it the ideal starter kit for neophytes to her oeuvre. Not only was it her first collaboration with her husband, the brilliant costumier and production designer, but, maybe even more importantly, it was her first in a run of successes with her favorite actor, Giancarlo Giannini. As a working class schlub, always kicked around the block by life – either by the Man, the mafia, or the Marxists – Giannini brings a kind of expressive sensitivity to his roles, and a kind of everyman sympathy to the most base of characters; he’s like an R-rated silent clown, falling somewhere between a Zap comic character and Charlie Chaplin. Climaxing in one of the most iconic and embarrassingly hilarious sex scenes in Wertmüller’s – or anyone’s – filmography, The Seduction of Mimi is sure to provoke – be it laughter or outrage, and sometimes both at the same time.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1972, DCP, 112min

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Dumb: The Story of Big Brother Magazine (Free sneak peek!)

Paulo Diaz Big Brother Magazine
6/3 - 8PM
Free w/ RSVP

When maverick skateboard company owner Steve Rocco kept having his controversial ads rejected by the prominent skateboard magazines in 1992, he did the next logical thing: create his own magazine to publish anything he wanted. Founded on being censorship-free in a time before the internet, Big Brother went on to gain cult notoriety for its irreverent, naughty, and blatantly stupid content.

Told through present-day interviews and archival footage – much of which has never been seen before – Dumb is a look back at the story of Big Brother and the dysfunctional family of misfits – including Jeff Tremaine, Johnny Knoxville, Chris Pontius, and Steve-O – that eventually outgrew the pages and home videos of the magazine to give birth to MTV’s Jackass, forever leaving a smear on pop culture. A Hulu Original Documentary.

The film will be accompanied by an exhibition in our Looking Garden Gallery – featuring works by Big Brother Magazine photo editor Rick Kosick, original ephemera, magazines, and more. On view through Sunday, June 4th.

Dir. Patrick O’Dell, 2017, DCP, 79 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Wild at Heart

Wild at Heart
6/3 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

David Lynch tackles the dual fantasticness of The Wizard of Oz and Elvis to produce one of the most memorable cult films of the ‘90s. This wicked, lurid, picaresque tale follows cool King worshipper/ex-con Sailor Ripley (Nicolas Cage) and his perpetually horny girlfriend Lula (Laura Dern) on the way to New Orleans while Lula’s witchy, twitchy obsessive mother (Diane Ladd) chases them across the country via a hired killer. In a nonstop tornado of epic gory weirdness, Cage and Dern run across the ultimate rogue’s gallery of filmic freakazoids played by Isabella Rossellini, Harry Dean Stanton, Sherilyn Fenn, Crispin Glover, Grace Zabriskie, Jack Nance, and Willem Dafoe (in the funky role of a lifetime) as a mentally malformed, lecherous, lizard-like greaseball unparalleled in movie villainy. This oh-so-quotable, deep-fried slice of lunacy can’t be seen enough times, so click your heels three times and come on down to pay tribute to this CinemaScope comic nightmare.

Dir. David Lynch, 1990, 35mm, 124 min.

All Screwed Up (newly restored!)

all screwed up
6/4 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Sitting comfortably in the firing-on-all-cylinders period of Lina Wertmüller’s directing career – a five-year run of masterpieces from Seduction of Mimi to Seven Beauties – 1974’s lesser known, but equally fantastic All Screwed Up follows the struggles and misadventures of a group of young Sicilian migrants trying to make a life for themselves in the bustling city of Milan. Seamlessly blending sex farce, sociopolitical drama, and physical comedy into an episodic rumination on the trials of the urban working class, Wertmüller keeps her touch light while never shying away from the unpleasantries of life and love among Europe’s lower castes. Pulsing with a great 70s funk score – perfect accompaniment to the smog-drenched cityscapes – All Screwed Up highlights Wertmüller’s keen sense of the absurd and cements her status as a unique yet versatile cinematic voice.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1974, DCP, 105min

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Fantastic Planet (Off-site at Zebulon)

fantastic planet
6/4 - 8PM
$5/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office and Zebulon LA

After-soirée and DJ set by Zebulon DJs!

This event will take place at Zebulon, located at 2478 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039. Doors open at 7pm, show at 8pm.

Join your favorite blue aliens for a screening of 1973 cult French classic, Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage), the hypnotic sci-fi masterpiece by director René Laloux and illustrator Roland Topor. Based on the French sci-fi novel Oms en série by Stefan Wul, Fantastic Planet follows a revolutionary clash on the alien planet Ygam, where enslaved humans – Oms – are treated as pets by their giant native blue masters – Draags – in their meditation-based utopia. Developed at the Jirí Trnka Studios in the old Czech Republic, Fantastic Planet is a landmark of hallucinatory animation, thanks to Topor’s surreal, eerie creature and background designs, and an amazing, psychedelic soundtrack by French jazz pianist Alain Goraguer (sideman of Boris Vian and Serge Gainsbourg).

Dir. René Laloux, 1973, digital presentation, 72 minutes

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Jackass: The Movie

Jackass The Movie (1)
6/4 - 8PM
$12/free for members

Charlie Chaplin-via-Slayer; low-budget exploitation suspense on a skateboard; The French Connection made by morons; or, for Richard Roeper, the “feel-sick movie of the year.” Jackass feels just as delectably twisted and abhorrent today as it did in 2002 – a primal scream of pointless white-boy idiocy whose influence is felt in everything from Ali G to Odd Future to The Eric Andre Show. A long-player version of MTV’s hit TV show, Jackass follows Johnny Knoxville, Steve-O, Wee Man, Bam Margera, Ryan Dunn and company (partially assembled from affiliates of Big Brother magazine) as they dive into alligator-infested waters, crash golf carts, affix muscle stimulators to genitals; and defecate in public, amongst other hilarious, repellant, utterly enrapturing stunts. It’s also a time capsule, a document of The Wild Bunch of skateboarding riding the irrationally exuberant 1990′s straight to hell. Co-starring Rip Taylor, Mat Hoffman, Spike Jonze, Henry Rollins, and Tony Hawk.

Dir. Jeff Tremaine, 2002, 35mm, 87 min.

Jackass Number Two

jackass 2
6/4 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Jean-Luc Godard wrote of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Wrong Man, “the subject of this film lies less in the unexpectedness of events than in their probability.” He might as well have been writing on the opening scene in Jackass Number Two – in which Chris Pontius slips a mouse costume over his genitals, then feeds it through a glory hole into a snake-filled tank. Or when Bam Margera sketches a stunt involving Wee Man jumping off a bridge whilst tied to Preston Lacy with a bungee cord. Or even when Steve-O runs a fish hook through his cheek and dives into shark-infested waters. Though the gross-out factor puts Jackass Number Two closer to De Palma than Hitch, this sequel’s true modus operandi is to up the ante Gremlins 2 or Magic Mike XXL-style; it’s ruthlessly funny, expertly paced, and so uncompromising in its vision of reckless asininity that it approaches an almost pure cinema.

Dir. Jeff Tremaine, 2006, 35mm, 92 min.

Seven Beauties (newly restored!)

seven beauties 2
6/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

1975’s Seven Beauties finds vanguard director Lina Wertmüller at the top of her game, landing her the honor of being the first woman ever nominated by the Academy for best director. Using every filmic device at her disposal – including graphic violence, farcical humor, and experimental montage – Wertmüller details the picaresque survival odyssey of a dandy (roguish, heavy-lidded Wertmüller muse Giancarlo Giannini) in Mussolini’s fascist Italy. Capturing Giannini’s desperation in long, handheld takes, the film dazzles with its confidence – both in its technical mastery of the medium and its unflinching delivery of scathing socio-political commentary – while being fast-paced and flat-out entertaining. A true tour-de-force and defining work of one of cinema’s greatest auteurs, female or otherwise.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1975, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Dr. Katz: The Audio Files Live!

960
6/6 - 7:30PM
$25 GA/$40 VIP

Presented by Audible Comedy

When the beloved, Squigglevision-animated Dr. Katz aired its final episode in 1999 – after six memorable and amazing seasons – we were all left with comedy abandonment complexes. And maybe we’re projecting, but Dr. Katz was more than a comedy therapist to us; with his soft-spoken and laid back wit, empathetic spirit and kind humour, he was also one of the best TV dads around. Well, he’s back and ready to heal our wounds and renew our entertainment attachments, with a new audio series on Audible – the perfect format for his musical cadence and dry improvisational stylings. It’s Dr. Katz: The Audio Files – and we’re lucky enough to record one live here at Cinefamily, with Jonathan Katz, Laura Silverman, and 5 very special celebrity patients!

VIP Tickets include priority seating. Purchase them here.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

Twin Peaks - Fire Walk With Me
6/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me rates as one of Lynch’s most shattering works, a true horror film that shocks and haunts the viewer long after the final frame. Following the secret, sordid life of golden girl Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) as she descends into drug-fueled madness due to years of abuse at the hands of her possibly possessed father (an incredible Ray Wise), the film eschews much of the show’s lighter touches for hysteria and terror – a choice that suits the dark roads leading to Laura’s inevitable outcome. Surrealistic flourishes abound, brought on in part by Laura’s chemically-induced mania but also as mythology elements, like the infamous Black Lodge – a disembodied location where strange characters deliver cryptic messages to future hero Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan). Aside from the cast regulars the film also features cameos from Lynch himself, crooner Chris Isaak and a particularly bizarre and wonderful turn from the late great David Bowie.

According to Lynch himself, a refresher-viewing of Fire Walk With Me is highly recommended before indulging in Twin Peaks Season 3…

Dir. David Lynch, 1992, DCP, 135 min.

The Phantom Carriage w/ live accompaniment by Matti Bye

phantomcarriage_website
6/7 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

Featuring accompaniment by Matti Bye!

A gorgeous liquid nightmare of a movie, the dark Swedish masterpiece The Phantom Carriage is still, over ninety years since its release, nothing short of shocking. Filmed in 1920 and released the following New Year’s Day, this story of a girl’s dying wish to redeem one troubled man’s soul remains one of the most sumptuously shot and technically accomplished films ever made, silent and otherwise. Years before the availability of the optical printer, director/star Victor Sjöström utilized painstakingly timed hand-cranked cameras and intricate edits to execute its flashbacks-within-flashbacks and countless double exposures — lending this ghost story a haunting, vivid dimension, from the otherworldly and familiar specter of Death to the chilling Swedish landscape that exists as its own character. As well, it has the distinction of originating an immeasurable number of elements throughout cinematic history, from The Seventh Seal’s hooded Reaper to Nicholson’s axe-wielding rampage in The Shining. It’s no wonder that Ingmar Bergman called it “the film of all films,” and watched it at least once a year following his first viewing at age fifteen. It’s a film that elevated its medium to heights it still, to this day, only rarely attains.

Dir. Victor Sjöström, 1921, DCP, 104 min.

A Night Full of Rain (35mm!)

night full of rain
6/7 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

A Night Full of Rain gleefully pits communism against feminism in the form of a doomed couple (played by Wertmüller favorite Giancarlo Giannini and a stunning Candice Bergen), as seen from the perspective of the “friends” – a Greek chorus of judgmental spectators. This claustrophobic portrait of a couple swings between the past and present, as husband and wife engage in a night-long marital drama set to the tune of torrential downpours and TV news of apocalyptic levels of atmospheric pollution. Alternately titled The End of the World in our Usual Bed in a Night Full of Rain, this first-English language effort from Wertmüller is perhaps her most bizarre, high concept film – but also one that rewards – both with enrapturing, formally ambitious cinematography, and its much needed interrogation of the concept of “communist chic.” Not to be missed.

Dir. Lina Wertmüller, 1978, 35mm, 104 min.

Print courtesy of the Istituto Luce Cinecittà
Luce Cinecetta

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Fox and His Friends

fox and his friends
6/8 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

For those who prefer their trenchant class commentary served with a side of beefcake, Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Fox and His Friends drops a rags-to-riches Cinderella tale into the singular milieu of the 1970s Munich gay scene. After a blue-collar bathroom cruiser and erstwhile circus freak (played with deep empathy by Fassbinder himself) wins a small fortune on the lottery, the sudden boost in social status that this fortune affords places him among company far more treacherous than the crooks, queens, and hustlers he knew on the street.

With painterly compositions (featuring a cheekily phallocentric mise-en-scène) and a brilliant tone at once deadpan and melodramatic, Fox and His Friends extracts curious humor and sincere humanity from a fall to ruin as heartbreaking as it is ultimately predictable. You’re likely to watch this nightmare of a love story through parted fingers, waiting to flinch.

Dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1975, 35mm, 123 min.

MULTI CULT

MULTICULTflyer_c_sm2
6/8 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

MULTI CULT is a ritual variety show hosted and curated by Lyra Hill. MULTI CULT celebrates diversity of experience and difference of opinion as the true path to enlightenment. MULTI CULT makes up and breaks down spiritual experiences with rigor and spectacle. MULTI CULT grins and bears the truth. MUTLI CULT is sweet too.

This edition of MULTI CULT will explore: an animated Nigerian space station; sacred clowning; cartoon sunsets; participatory physical academia; revelatory storytelling; self-aware paranoia; a ghost meter; a sermon; live musical accompaniment by Tyson Thurston and live visual accompaniment by Jason Ogawa.

Featuring:
Adebukola Buki Bodunrin & Ezra Claytan Daniels / Ruji “Stargatekeeper” Chapnik / hollis j. hart / Lyra Hill / Jason Ogawa / Vanja Smiljanic / Tyson Thurston / Sasha Tracy / Dav Yendler

LYRA HILL is a filmmaker, cartoonist, performer, educator, radio host, and radical priestess. From 2011-2014 she hosted and organized BRAIN FRAME, the legendary underground performative-comix reading series. She has screened, published, and performed in Canada, Mexico, Scotland, England, Australia, Greece and across the US. In 2016 NewCity Magazine called her Chicago’s “Best Urban Ritualist.” She lives in Los Angeles.

Variety (w/ Bette Gordon in person)

Variety_still booth
6/9 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Drenched in the sumptuous cherry red neon of a pre-Guiliani Times Square, Variety is a Hitchcockian thriller flipped on its axis: our voyeur is a Hitchcock blonde and her objet a man. Christine (Sandy McLeod) takes a job at a porn theater, where she sits in a vestibule selling tickets to men – a trifling job which begets deep fascinations. Gordon sketches Christine’s psychic transformation with mesmerizing, cinematic sequences that tease out the authoritative power of particularly gendered transactions and spaces – like a dreamy montage of men shaking hands, the seedy Variety theater itself, black town cars on financial district streets, and the Fulton Fish Market. It’s also a who’s who of downtown NY – penned by Kathy Acker, scored by Jim Jarmusch collaborator John Lurie, and with appearances by Nan Goldin, Luis Guzman, and Cookie Mueller. Upon its release, the film ran at the real Variety theater, no doubt to some audience members that could just as easily be denizens of the film’s world.

Dir. Bette Gordon, 1983, 35mm, 100 min.

Peeping Tom (introduced by Bette Gordon)

peeping-tom
6/9 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…

Dir. Michael Powell, 1960, DCP, 101 min.

The Wraith

the wraith
6/9 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Like it’s titular rider, The Wraith is one of the 80s more below-the-radar gems, and a tire-squealing, good-time ghost ride. Pre-winning (but really winning) Charlie Sheen plays a mysterious teen who comes to a desert town looking for love and maybe a lil’ vengeance, and finds an absurdly hot Sherilyn Fenn, who is being harassed by her murderous, street racing ex-boyfriend – played with scenery-chewing gusto by John Cassavetes’ son and future director himself, Nick Cassavetes. Got all that? To say more would spoil the fun; if you love 80s horror and/or motorcycle exploitation and you’ve somehow missed this turbo-charged thrill-ride, it’s time to rectify that with some high octane, big screen, beyond the grave vengeance!

Print courtesy of the American Genre Film Archive.

Dir. Mike Marvin, 1986, 35mm, 93 min.

Bette Gordon & Lizzie Borden in conversation, featuring The Drowning

BC_Photo_03
6/10 - 5PM
$14/free for members

Independent filmmakers, friends – and bearers of sonically similar names – Lizzie Borden (Working Girls, Born in Flames) and Bette Gordon (Variety, Handsome Harry) join us for a conversation! Following their discussion, we’ll screen Gordon’s new film, The Drowning.

Based on a Pat Barker novel, The Drowning is a taut thriller – a genre Gordon mastered with the 1983 Variety. The film follows an exceedingly normal couple (played by Josh Charles and Julia Stiles) as the glassy ordinariness of their lives is easily punctured by the appearance of a young, unpredictable man. Charles’s character is a child psychologist and the film is a psychological thriller, for certain – but it is ultimately Gordon’s interest in narrative tension that takes center stage.

Dir. Bette Gordon, 2016, DCP, 95 min.

Klute (introduced by Lizzie Borden)

klute
6/10 - 9PM
$12/free for members

“I love Klute for Jane Fonda’s Bree, full of contradictions – in one scene, she hums a hymn while smoking a joint and consulting Linda Goodman’s Sun Signs. No victim, she feels empowered by hooking and objectified by modeling auditions. She is the most modern of sex workers.” –Lizzie Borden

Moody neo-noir and the first film in Alan J. Pakula’s paranoid trilogy (followed by The Parallax View and All the President’s Men), murder mystery Klute is a stylish and shadowy hot bolt of anxiety. Bree Daniels (a steely Jane Fonda at the height of her fame) is a brash, bohemian call girl, thrust into the orbit of small town detective Klute (Donald Sutherland in one of his first major performances) yet determined to maintain the power she so effortlessly wields. The film’s magnetic dread washes over the two – and 1970s New York – as they marginally upend each others’ psyches, bit by bit. Ambiguous editing and masterful cinematography by Gordon Willis (The Godfather, Manhattan) ratchet up terror around the mysterious, murderous presence, but also the film’s other horror: the violent politics of relationships between men and women.

Dir. Alan J. Pakula, 1971, 35mm, 114 min.

Desperate Living

desperate living
6/10 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

John Waters’ first film without regular leading lady Divine is also one of his most extreme and gut-busting trash epics, kicking off with perhaps the funniest ten minutes he ever filmed as harried mental patient Peggy Gravel (Mink Stole) loses her marbles and, with the aid of obese maid Grizelda (Jean Hill), smothers her husband to death. On the lam, these “sisters in crime” wind up in the evil magic kingdom of Mortville, presided over by the sadistic and completely insane Queen Carlotta (Edith Massey) who forces her male guards to perform strip routines. Toss in a dog food murderer, a nudist garbage man, a panty-sniffing patrol cop, gaudy production design including a cut-rate Day-Glo palace, a rabid princess, and a most wince-inducing scissors sex change, and you’ve got an X-rated bedtime story that only the maker of Pink Flamingos could tell.

Dir. John Waters, 1977, 35mm, 90 min.

Private Rental

6/11 - 7PM

For this timeslot, we will not be open to the public, as some lucky patron has rented our theater — both supporting the Cinefamily and using the beautiful Silent Movie Theatre for their own event. The theater can be yours, too! Weddings, premieres of your film with an on-site afterparty, business-related entertaining, great birthdays, bar or bat mitzvahs, or any other kind of celebration you can imagine — it’s better at the movies. For more information, email “events@cinefamily.org”

Harold and Maude

harold and maude
6/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for Harold and Maude.

“I don’t like to tell lies.” -Hal Ashby

Greg sez: The movie we need right now. While Orange 45 confuses and depresses us with chaos and misrule, we can grab life by the neck and give it a big kiss. Harold is a young man who doesn’t want to live. Maude is an older woman who has a talent for living. They meet at a funeral and the fun begins there. The quirky and intelligent Hal Ashby (Being There, Coming Home) made a poignant, romantic film that wasn’t initially a hit but became the very definition of a cult classic. Written by Colin Higgins – who also wrote Greg Proops Film Club feminist offering 9 to 5Harold and Maude is an amazingly moving comedy about life, love, loss, and family. Maude is a cheerleader for living your life, doing her best to persuade the suicidal Harold of what is important: singing, not respecting authority, and running around the world like a mad person. Ruth Gordon is delightful and wise as Maude, and Bud Cort, for better or worse, defined his career with his brilliant take on the morbid Harold. Come down to the movies with your friend or date and have some popcorn and soda and laugh and cry goddammit. LIVE, LIVE! Otherwise, you got nothing to talk about in the locker room.

Dir. Hal Ashby, 1971, 35mm, 91 min.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

fire walk with me 2
6/13 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me rates as one of Lynch’s most shattering works, a true horror film that shocks and haunts the viewer long after the final frame. Following the secret, sordid life of golden girl Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) as she descends into drug-fueled madness due to years of abuse at the hands of her possibly possessed father (an incredible Ray Wise), the film eschews much of the show’s lighter touches for hysteria and terror – a choice that suits the dark roads leading to Laura’s inevitable outcome. Surrealistic flourishes abound, brought on in part by Laura’s chemically-induced mania but also as mythology elements, like the infamous Black Lodge – a disembodied location where strange characters deliver cryptic messages to future hero Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan). Aside from the cast regulars the film also features cameos from Lynch himself, crooner Chris Isaak and a particularly bizarre and wonderful turn from the late great David Bowie.

According to Lynch himself, a refresher-viewing of Fire Walk With Me is highly recommended before indulging in Twin Peaks Season 3…

Dir. David Lynch, 1992, DCP, 135 min.

The Leather Boys (w/ writer Rachel Kushner and director Sidney Furie in person!)

leather boys
6/14 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This sharply observed slice-of-life takes the speedy marriage of cockney teens Dot and biker Reggie as its premise. The marriage sours instantly, leading Reggie to take refuge with his biker friends, particularly Pete – with whom he enjoys a whirlwind romance of a friendship, the implications of which he is slow to face. With The Leather Boys, Furie crafted both a touchstone of queer cinema and a seminal example of British kitchen sink realism. The film will be presented by Rachel Kushner (author of Telex from Cuba, The Flamethrowers) who counts it among her favorites. Following the screening, she will moderate a Q&A with director Sidney Furie!

The Leather Boys is one of my all-time favorite movies. An incredible time capsule of the biker scene at London’s legendary Ace Cafe, it is also a subversive masterpiece about bleak working class destiny.” – Rachel Kushner

Dir. Sidney Furie, 1964, 35mm, 108 min.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me

fire walk with me
6/14 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me rates as one of Lynch’s most shattering works, a true horror film that shocks and haunts the viewer long after the final frame. Following the secret, sordid life of golden girl Laura Palmer (Sheryl Lee) as she descends into drug-fueled madness due to years of abuse at the hands of her possibly possessed father (an incredible Ray Wise), the film eschews much of the show’s lighter touches for hysteria and terror – a choice that suits the dark roads leading to Laura’s inevitable outcome. Surrealistic flourishes abound, brought on in part by Laura’s chemically-induced mania but also as mythology elements, like the infamous Black Lodge – a disembodied location where strange characters deliver cryptic messages to future hero Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan). Aside from the cast regulars the film also features cameos from Lynch himself, crooner Chris Isaak and a particularly bizarre and wonderful turn from the late great David Bowie.

According to Lynch himself, a refresher-viewing of Fire Walk With Me is highly recommended before indulging in Twin Peaks Season 3…

Dir. David Lynch, 1992, DCP, 135 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses2
6/16 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

OK Computer 20th Anniversary feat. Meeting People Is Easy

radiohead-GWSJ_o_tn
6/16 - 10PM
$12/free for members

This summer marks 20 years since Radiohead unleashed their epochal art-rock masterpiece OK Computer on an unsuspecting world. Thom Yorke’s angst-laden lyrics painted a digitally disconnected age of unease marked by globalization, paranoia, and the wish that aliens would just take us away from it all (sounds about right). It’s precisely this mood of modern melancholy and isolation that documentarian Grant Gee expertly captured with Meeting People Is Easy, a cinematic counterpart so fitting it might as well be OK Computer: The Movie. Impressionistic and wildly experimental, Gee oscillates between film and digital, black & white and hyper-saturated color, double-exposure and time lapse, languid takes and stroboscopic editing to create an appropriately unnerving visualization of both the album’s themes and the band’s mental state. We get a fly-on-the-wall’s eye view as they dodge questions from journalists, hide out in hotel rooms, rehearse and undertake a recording session for an elusive (and still unreleased) song – all interspersed with incredible live performances and moments of naked candor.

Film preceded by a lovingly curated mix of vintage Radiohead favorites and rarities!

Dir. Grant Gee, 1998, 35mm, 99 min.

Which Way Is Up?

which way is up 1977
6/16 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Considering the stratospheric celebrity Richard Pryor enjoyed by the late 1970s, the singularly profane comedian could afford some eccentric career moves, and ’77 Lina Wertmüller adaptation Which Way Is Up? has to be first among them in terms of sheer improbability. Made in collaboration with El Teatro Campesino — a theater troupe affiliated with Cesar Chavez’s United Farm Workers — Michael Schultz’s film transports Wertmüller’s politically-aware sex comedy The Seduction of Mimi to the contentious — and conspicuously black and Hispanic — gestalt of the mid-century American labor movement. If this is starting to sound a little too highbrow, make no mistake — it’s not. Pryor stars in triplicate (Nutty Professor-style!), his invariably over-the-top characters bedecked in an array of discerning physical extrema, including iron grey eyebrow adhesives and one of those windswept bouffants Al Sharpton used to wear in his James Brown-managing heyday. From comically discrete camera frames, this unruly mob of Pryors play out Freudian rivalries and tit-for-tat infidelities, effectively skewering union politics, consumerist dogma, and ‘70s New Age spiritualism in the process.

Dir. Michael Schultz, 1977, 35mm, 94 min.

Kékszakállú

kekszakallu
6/17 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Presented by Acropolis Cinema

A meandering portrait of several young girls, Gastón Solnicki’s Kékszakállú is a beautifully ephemeral palette of color and tones. In the intensely creative world of independent Argentine filmmaking, Solnicki occupies a unique place. A trained musician, he has jumped from films about music composition and performance (Süden) to reformulating his own family’s home movies (Papirosen) to this latest, a Bluebeard inspired, impressionistic coming-of-age nonpareil. It’s a mesmerizing string of photographically and architecturally inspired set pieces, held together by a soundtrack blasting with Bela Bartok’s electrifying opera, “Bluebeard’s Castle.” Kékszakállú (“Bluebeard” in Hungarian) isn’t about the notoriously bloodthirsty character, but rather the drama of young women’s departure from childhood. Narrative conceit aside, Kékszakállú is heavy with the allure of adolescence and gracefully matter-of-fact in regards to its accompanying losses.

Dir. Gastón Solnicki, 2016, DCP, 72 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses3
6/17 - 8PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

The Company of Wolves

the company of wolves
6/17 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Little Red Riding Hood gets a gorgeous, horrific makeover in this dreamlike breakthrough classic from Neil Jordan. In a fantasy world imagined by young girl Rosaleen, a stern granny (Angela Lansbury) lectures her about the dangers of straying from the path and encountering hairy men harboring slavering wolves inside them. Spinning off into a series of breathtaking set pieces, this visual feast was initially lost in the ‘80s tumble when distributors tried to pass it off as another werewolf flick, sort of The Howling for the English lit crowd. The late English writer Angela Carter adapts her own stories to craft an unforgettable twilight journey through the forbidding depths of female adolescence, where a dash of lipstick is enough to unleash any number of hairy beasts hiding in the woods.

Dir. Neil Jordan, 1984, 35mm, 95 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

funeralparadeofroses5
6/18 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses6
6/19 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses2
6/20 - 12PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Monterey Pop 50th Anniversary

020.tif
6/20 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Presented by DKTR

Summer of Love & Summer Solstice celebration!

50th Anniversary Release! New restoration from Janus Films.

The electric, magnetic, vital portrait of one of the most incredible musical lineups ever assembled — and the gold standard for all rock festival films! Produced by impresario Lou Adler and The Mamas And The Papas’ John Phillips, 1967’s Monterey International Pop Music Festival was the first of its kind, and featured career-making crossover moments for Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Otis Redding — alongside equally shattering performances from The Who, Canned Heat, The Animals and a blissful Ravi Shankar. In Monterey Pop, director D.A. Pennebaker (fresh off the legendary Dylan doc Don’t Look Back) captures these landmark live sets intersecting with the very best of vintage peaceful California culture. Alongside the on-stage splendor of guitars and harmonies, Pennebaker’s roving cameras capture a host of vivid and stimulating eye candy amongst the throngs of festival-goers, also making the film an essential sociological document. With beautiful people, beautiful sounds and kaleidoscopic sights, Monterey Pop is an indispensable historical treasure — and a smashing good time.

Dir. D.A. Pennebaker, 1968, DCP, 79 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses3
6/21 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

funeralparadeofroses5
6/22 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Black Moon

black moon
6/22 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Every big-name internationally adored director, after years of critical acclaim, is bound to craft an off-the-cliff piece of one-for-the-ages capriciousness — and Louis Malle’s turn came with this seldom-seen, magically insane ‘70s fable. Drawing inspiration from Lewis Carroll, the story follows a lost English girl through a woodland landscape of the future, where men and women have declared war with one another and people can communicate with animals. She falls in with Joe Dallesandro and his incestuous sister, which leads to even more surreal developments (and some very uncomfortable nudity) leading up to a poetic finale involving a unicorn. Beautifully shot by the great Sven Nykvist at Malle’s own French home at the time, this stream-of-consciousness reverie remains rare, so come experience this love-it-or-hate-it brainblaster on the big screen while you can.

Dir. Louis Malle, 1975, 35mm, 100 min.

Alice in Wonderland: An X-rated Musical Fantasy

alice x rated
6/24 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

The makers of the softcore hit Flesh Gordon returned with this naughty, notorious musical comedy featuring sweet ‘70s starlet Kristine DeBell (Meatballs) banging, blowing, and finger-fiddling her way through Lewis Carroll’s goofy gallery of beloved characters. Sweet librarian Alice gets cold feet about going all the way with her boyfriend and follows the White Rabbit (played by a pseudonymous Larry Gelman from “The Bob Newhart Show”) into a Wonderland that leaves her a whole lot less inhibited thanks to a filthy Mad Hatter, a skinny and very frisky Tweedledum and Tweedledee, and a nasty Queen of Hearts, among many others. Sweet, witty, and naughty in the way only the ‘70s could be, this nifty time capsule feels like an off-Broadway musical staged by the staff of Penthouse. Don’t bring the kiddies to come and see a side of Alice that Tim Burton and Disney would never, ever dare show you.

Dir. Bud Townsend, 1976, 35mm, 81 min.

Freeway

MSDFREE EC006
6/25 - 8PM
$12/free for members

“Mix together one cup of Natural Born Killers with a half-cup of Los Olvidados, sprinkle liberally with freeze-dried bile and bake for 98 minutes… [Matthew] Bright, mercifully, is an allegorist who consistently prefers projectiles to platitudes.” – Allan Ulrich, San Francisco Chronicle

Reese Witherspoon struts her stuff in what is easily one of her best performances, as a jailbait Red Riding Hood named Vanessa tearing down the I-5 to see her granny, all the while being stalked by cunning, murderous pervert/child shrink Bob Wolverton (Kiefer Sutherland). This clever, hilarious genre mishmash marked the directorial debut of former Oingo Boingo member Matthew Bright (who co-wrote Forbidden Zone) and is just as wild as you’d expect, in addition to offering a surprisingly effective parable about the corrosion of the American justice system! Don’t miss this rare opportunity to experience this disturbing and weirdly uplifting gem in a theater the way the movie gods intended.

Dir. Matthew Bright, 1996, 35mm, 110 min.

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

valerie and her week of wonders
6/30 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

As joyful as it is impossible to pin down, Valerie is a haunting, psychoactive period piece which plunges the beautiful heroine Valerie into a phantasmagorical world of thirsty vampires, the dark arts, and dreamy free love — all set to one of the great film scores of the era, a cocktail of psych-folk and avant-garde classical by the great Lubos Fiser. The film opens with 13-year-old Valerie’s first menstruation and subsequent sexual awakening, her unsteady discovery of which lets loose a torrent of quixotic, hallucinatory experiences both terrifying and beautiful; amongst a haze of shifting tones and a flurry of role reversals and Gothic nightmares in broad daylight, Valerie floats along, buoyed by the fears and fantasies that come with nascent sexuality and teenage fantasy. This bewitching brew is a must to behold on 35mm — do not miss it.

Dir. Jaromil Jires, 1970, 35mm, 77 min.

Page 1 of 4712345...102030...Last »
http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org