Beau Travail (encore!)

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2/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

What happens when those who thrive on control find it slipping away? French Foreign Legion sergeant Galoup (Leos Carax regular Denis Lavant) violently fumbles with this quandary in Claire Denis’ masterful fifth feature, set in the Horn of Africa in the peacetime Republic of Djibouti. Like the rusting relics of this country’s militarized past, the chinks in Galoup’s armor begin to show as he struggles to maintain authority over his troops with the quiet desperation of a man newly drained of significance. As the lithe legionnaires run military drills (they are staying in shape for… what, exactly?), their perspiring bodies receive the same reverent lensing as the agile athletes of Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia, thanks to Denis’s longtime collaborator, cinematographer Agnès Godard. With simple stretching sessions blocked with geometric, Busby Berkeley-like precision, underwater sequences that flirt with the ghost of Esther Williams, and pulsing nighttime discotheques, Beau Travail looks back at its New Wave predecessors while tipping its beret to neoclassical ballet traditions for a singular piece of elliptical, formally abstracted cinema – with a final scene you might never forget.

Dir. Claire Denis, 1999, 35mm, 92 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Event (w/ director Sergei Loznitsa in person!)

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3/1 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This program is co-presented by Los Angeles Filmforum with the support of the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts

In August 1991 a failed coup d’état attempt (known as Putsch) was orchestrated by a group of hard-core communists in Moscow, and followed by the collapse of the USSR soon after. As president Gorbachev was detained by the coup leaders, state-run TV and radio channels broadcast nothing but Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake,” while crowds gathered in the streets. Via found footage taken by eight cameramen in St. Petersburg (where a young Putin can be briefly seen), Loznitsa examines those crowds, as they sway between confusion, disbelief, anger, and empowerment. A quarter of a century after the political upheaval it depicts, The Event asks what really happened during the tumultuous August of 1991 – the collapse of an empire, or simply its the seeds of its creative reimagining?

Dir. Sergei Loznitsa, 2015, DCP, 74 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Great Dictator

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3/3 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“Speak – it is our only hope.” – Commander Schultz, The Great Dictator

After holding out on making talkies longer than any other filmmaker, the first film in which Chaplin spoke turned out to be one of his greatest and most beloved successes, and one that still captivates audiences to this day, with its blend of heartfelt humanist intentions and the captivating physical comedy that Chaplin had so rigorously perfected. Inspired in part by a bizarre twist of fate that led both he and the rising fascist dictator of Germany to sport the same tiny moustache, The Great Dictator finds Charlie in the dual roles of wound-up, gibberish-spewing “Adenoid Hynkel” (leader of the fictional dictatorship Tomania) and The Tramp, a heroic Jewish barber who, after a Rip Van Winkle-like hospitalization, ruffles the government’s feathers. Featuring the famous “balloon ballet” sequence, along with countless other classic mirthful set pieces and an outstanding turn by beautiful co-star Paulette Goddard, The Great Dictator is “an impassioned plea for peace, tolerance, and humanity” (Allmovie.com).

Dir. Charles Chaplin, 1940, 35mm, 124 min.

Catfight

CATFIGHT 3
3/3 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Monsters

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3/4 - 11AM
$10/free for kids under 14

M is for March
M is for…
Monsters!

Join us for an abominable compilation of colossal cartoons plus our complimentary cereal bar! Pajamas encouraged.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Films of Guy Debord (with Olivier Assayas in person)

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3/4 - 6:30PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Olivier Assayas was 13 in May ‘68. Growing up in the Paris of the 70s and precociously political, he was absorbed in the work of writer, filmmaker, and founding member of the Situationist International Guy Debord (notably, of La société du spectacle fame). Assayas presents two underrated and underseen films by Guy Debord: Critique de la separation and In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.

Assayas on Debord:
“Debord published his Collected Cinematographic Works in 1980, I think, and then I read it. I had not seen the short films. No one had seen them. I had no idea—even remotely—what they looked like. I had read them and I loved them. And at the end, there was a text with a description of the new film. So basically, when In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni (We Spin Around the Night Consumed by the Fire) opened, I had already read the whole texts a couple of times. And when I saw the film, for me it was simply one of the meaningful modern works of art I had come across, at any level.”

Critique de la separation
Dir. Guy Debord, 1961, digital presentation, 20 min.

In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni
Dir. Guy Debord, 1978, digital presentation, 100 min.

Rare shorts & music films (with Olivier Assayas and Kim Gordon in person)

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3/4 - 9:30PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Emerging as a filmmaker in the 80s, Assayas’s early work coincided with the explosion of punk and subsequent post-punk music and culture. Assayas presents a selection of his rare shorts and music films, including a portrait of Winston Tong (of Tuxedomoon), music videos for French pop musician Jacno, and Hotel Atithi – a collage composed for Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore and named for a Mumbai hotel. With Kim Gordon in person.

Hotel Atithi
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2005, digibeta, 35 min.

Winston Tong en studio
Dir Olivier Assayas, 1984, 35mm, 10 min.

Rectangle – Deux chansons de Jacno
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1980, digibeta, 8 min.

Laissé inachevé à Tokyo
Dir Olivier Assayas, 1982, digital presentation, 22 min.

Segment from omnibus film Paris je t’aime
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2006, digibeta.

Catfight

catfight14
3/4 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Adalen 31 (with Olivier Assayas in person)

adalen
3/5 - 5PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“Widerberg tells the film as gracefully as the impressionist painters” – Olivier Assayas

Bo Widerberg’s Adalen 31 is seminal work by one of Sweden’s most seminal filmmakers. Winner of a Special Jury prize at Cannes in 1969, it is a gorgeous ode to the workers who striked, struggled, in some cases died in the 1931 Adalen Riots – a historical confrontation between the military and labour demonstrators that ended in tragedy, but paved the way for worker’s rights in the following century. Widerberg is sometimes called the anti-Bergman, because he is more concerned with man’s relationship with his fellow man, than his relationship with God. Serious as the subject is, Widerberg finds charm and humanity in the day to day lives of his town of sawmill workers, who must while away the weeks, hungry and out of work, waiting for a new era to come. By finding a light touch – with cinematic grace galore – Widerberg transmits the emotional power of their struggle with strength. Shown in 35mm, with an imported print from the Swedish Film Institute.

Dir. Bo Widerberg, 1969, 35mm, 110 min.

Irma Vep (with Olivier Assayas in person)

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3/5 - 8PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Olivier Assayas broke through internationally with his jazzy decoupage Irma Vep. Not content with documentary realism, Assayas introduced New Wave flourishes into this behind-the-scenes story, which follows actress Maggie Cheung (playing a fictionalized version of herself) as she navigates the screaming insecurities and general dysfunction of a French film set. Venerable auteur Rene Vidal (New Wave darling Jean-Pierre Leaud) casts her as the lead his remake of the Louis Feuillade’s Les Vampires. However, not everyone on the production agrees with his radical casting choice, or anything else for that matter; Cheung is subjected to petty squabbles, ego clashes, and a tightly stitched black latex body suit. Assayas drew upon the avant-garde, Hong Kong action movies, and silent shorts – infusing these styles with signature rhythm and deft vision, crafting an inspired pop filmmaking masterpiece. Newly restored!

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1996, DCP restoration, 99 min.

Screens with Man Yuk: A Portrait of Maggie Cheung
Dir. Olivier Assayas, 1997, digibeta, 5 min.

Catfight

CATFIGHT 2
3/5 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Clouds of Sils Maria

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3/6 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Kristen Stewart, not to be outdone by Twilight co-star Robert Pattinson’s partnership with David Cronenberg, set the arthouse world on fire with Clouds of Sils Maria, her first film with legendary French auteur Olivier Assayas (she also stars in his newest film, Personal Shopper, leading all of us to hope that the two keep working together). Stewart is the personal assistant to an international film star, played by the great Juliette Binoche; after the death of a playwright friend, the two ensconce themselves in his remote mountain home to rehearse lines. Barriers between the reality of their relationship, the fantasy of the play, and the world of the film itself quickly begin to blur. By the time Chloë Grace Moretz appears in a film-within-the-film as a gold leather-clad sci-fi warrior, well, things could get weirder. For Assayas fans, Clouds is a visual and emotional feast – and one of his most accomplished films in years. For newcomers, prepare for total cinematic envelopment as Kristen Stewart drives through the winding roads of Sils Maria set to Primal Scream.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2014, DCP, 123min

Catfight

CATFIGHT 3
3/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Catfight

catfight14
3/7 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Catfight

CATFIGHT 2
3/8 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

Fraud (w/ director Dean Fleischer-Camp & Nathan Fielder in person!)

fraud_bydeanfleischercamp_h_2017
3/9 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Followed by Q&A a with director Dean Fleischer-Camp, moderated by Nathan Fielder (Nathan for You)

A great feat of editing, Fraud follows a working class family in pursuit of the contemporary, ultra-capitalist American Dream… or so it seems. With an impressionistic meta-narrative constructed from one family’s 100+ hours of confessional YouTube uploads, Fleischer-Camp’s succinct piece revels in the slippery relation between fact and fantasy on the World Wide Web. Composed entirely of found-footage, Fraud challenges the bounds of both documentary and narrative at every turn, suggesting that perhaps, it’s neither.

Dir. Dean Fleischer-Camp, 2016, DCP, 52 min.

Watch the trailer!

Catfight

CATFIGHT 3
3/9 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Onur Tukel’s knockout satire Catfight could easily be subtitled, “A Comedy in Three Acts (of Sensational Violence).” When Veronica, a rich Soho wine mom (Sandra Oh) crosses paths with old college friend Ashley, a neurotic struggling artist (Anne Heche), underhanded compliments quickly give way to coma-inducing uppercuts. Two years later, Veronica wakes up to find she’s lost everything–but has gained a mortal enemy. Heche and Oh throw themselves into their roles–and at each other, delivering ferociously on the promise of the title. Between rounds, Catfight paints a bruisingly funny portrait of bourgeois dysfunction, ratcheting up the economic, racial, sexual and political resentment until mud-slinging explodes into mud-wrestling. Tukel delights as much in turning the tables on his snobbish protagonists–the idea of “punching up” has never been more painfully literal–as he does watching them bludgeon each other with the chairs. If a good comedy is supposed to leave you crying and gasping for breath, what we have here is the cinematic equivalent of a chokehold. Trust us: it’s a good thing.

Dir. Onur Tukel, 2016, DCP, 96 min.

Watch the trailer!

A Face in the Crowd

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3/10 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

A parable about the dangers of media sensationalism, the problems with “15-minute” fame culture, and unchecked greed, Kazan’s film came at the tail end of a string of masterpieces—among them A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, and East of Eden—and is a scathing indictment of the power of the media in American culture. From a script by long-time collaborator Budd Schulberg, Face follows the meteoric rise of folk singer Larry “Lonesome” Rhodes (Andy Griffith) as he moves from local drunkard to regional celebrity to national fame (with attendant political influence) due to his magnetic personality and “folk hero” persona. Behind the scenes, Lonesome is disparaging of his fans, writing them off as easily manipulated, unintelligent masses—a viewpoint which both shocks and disappoints Marcia Jeffries (Patricia Neal), a producer who sprang Lonesome from prison in the first place. A film that “speaks volumes about the media’s complicit involvement with corrupt governments owned by faceless corporations. . . A Face in the Crowd is, in fact, as fresh and relevant as tomorrow’s headlines” (Thomas Beltzer). –NW Film Center

Dir. Elia Kazan, 1957, 35mm, 126 min.

They Live

They Live
3/10 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Presented in conjunction with Fight the Power!

Upon its original 1988 release, John Carpenter’s Reagan era screed They Live went largely unsung; sure, smallish audiences thrilled to “Rowdy” Roddy Piper and Keith David’s endless knock-down, drag-out alley fight, and the general message of non-conformity was well received among the Carpenter-converted. But no one anticipated the film’s ever-building cult status, or how prescient it would be thirty years later. Chilling images of Carpenter’s skull-faced aliens and the film’s ominous slogans have inspired numerous artists (not the least of which is street artist/activist Shepard Fairey); to say that They Live has had a cultural impact beyond its initial release is something of an understatement. There is no horror movie more appropriate for our current political times, so it only seems fitting to revisit this masterful cinematic metaphor, and once again OBEY!

Dir. John Carpenter, 1988, 35mm, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Salvation Hunters

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3/11 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Josef von Sternberg’s first film – shot for less than $4,800 on location in San Pedro, Chinatown and the San Fernando Valley – was possibly Hollywood’s first “independent” production. The gritty realism of its locations, the lack of artifice in its story and the lower depths of its characters shocked audiences and the industry alike. The film remains thoroughly modern. Sternberg’s images thrive on composition and stasis. His ending resolves nothing and yet everything is different. The Salvation Hunters made a star not only of Sternberg, but also of Georgia Hale, who would play opposite Chaplin in The Gold Rush (1925). Jan-Christopher Horak, Courtesy of the UCLA Film and Television Archive

Dir. Josef von Sternberg, 1925, 35mm, 70min

35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive

A Grin Without a Cat

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3/11 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…

Dir. Chris Marker, 1977, 35mm.

Prevenge

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3/17 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Prevenge

alice-lowe-in-prevenge
3/18 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Prevenge

prevenge-2016-alice-lowe
3/19 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Doug Benson Movie Interruption: Collateral Beauty

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3/20 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and friends (who in the past have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the couches, mics in hand, and say whatever pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen. This month’s pick is Collateral Beauty!

Dir. David Frankel, 2016, DCP, 97 min.

Prevenge

prevenge-2016-comedy-horror-alice-lowe-graveyard
3/20 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Prevenge

Prevengepic1-600x429
3/21 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Prevenge

alice-lowe-in-prevenge
3/22 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

Prevenge

prevenge-2016-alice-lowe
3/23 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“You know, most people think babies are sweet… but I’m bitter. It’s you who needs to act now, Mummy. For the both of us.”

That voice you’re hearing might be your protective, motherly conscience – or it might be the voice of your unborn child, speaking to you from within your own possessed loins. British screenwriter and actress Alice Lowe (Garth Marenghi’s Dark Place, Sightseers) plunges her sharpened knife deep into her directorial debut with Prevenge, a cautionary tale of prenatal horror that stands hand-in-hand with early 90s French slasher Baby Blood – but with a feminist bent. A very pregnant Lowe (she was indeed with child during the two weeks of filming in bland, suburban Cardiff) plays mother-to-be Ruth, whose impending bundle of joy is making dead sure Mummy has no control over her mind – to say nothing of her body, which the charming, ruthless fetus wields like her favorite plaything. Lowe’s biting, warped satire and forays into extreme body horror take the male-dominated realm of genre filmmaking by the balls in this singular exploration of what not to expect when you’re expecting.

Dir. Alice Lowe, 2016, DCP, 87 min.

The King and the Mockingbird

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3/25 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Presented in conjunction with Fight the Power!

A delightfully aware and exquisite children’s tale about the dangers of fascism and the power of self-image, The King and the Mockingbird (Le roi et l’oiseau) tells of a vainglorious king’s painting coming to life and deposing of its image-sake. This new king hunts down the also-risen portraits of a young shepherdess he admires and her lover-boy chimney sweep in order to steal her hand. Based on the work of Hans Christian Andersen, this affably subversive animated adventure was scripted by legendary Jacques Prevert (Port of Shadows, Children of Paradise). A wildly inventive treat and apropos fable, the film took decades to see release and was a big inspiration for Studio Ghibli founder Hayao Miyazaki.

Dir. Paul Grimault, 1980, DCP, 83 min.

All the President's Men

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3/25 - 6:30PM
$12/free for members

“If you’ve got them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.” Alan Pakula’s deep-dive into deep-dives launched a thousand careers in journalism and reinvented the political conspiracy film. Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford deliver career performances as Woodward and Bernstein, the muckraking Washington Post reporters whose investigations of Nixon and his intelligence agency cover-ups ushered in our era of political paranoia. Pakula paces the story like a thriller – with every clack of a typewriter, hesitating voice on the phone, and reverberation in a courtroom, generating an ominous momentum towards shadowy conclusions. All the President’s Men is a commentary on conspiracy itself, on the paranoid style in American thinking, and how that style brushes up against the skill, power, and training of elite bureaucracy. Alongside The Godfather, Taxi Driver, and others, President’s is one of the New Hollywood masterpieces, bringing together the movement’s greatest cinematographer (Gordon Willis), composer (David Shire), and two of its most iconic stars.

Dir. Alan J. Pakula, 1976, 35mm, 138 min.

Demonlover

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3/25 - 9:45PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Critically maligned after it was unleashed upon the 2002 Cannes Film Festival, Assayas’ underseen, ice-cold cyber thriller hurtles 100 MPH down the transgressive path toward New French Extremity. The ruthless relations of international business and a grab-bag of post-9/11, globalized industry set the stage upon which Demonlover’s 3-D animated porn-slinging players – including the frigid Connie Nielsen, alluring Gina Gershon, and a French-speaking Chloe Sevigny – connive, drug, threaten, and seduce their way toward ultimate financial control over one salacious, interactive product. The characters’ attempts to navigate this confused conflation of power-hungry nations is mirrored in the film’s spectacularly schizophrenic soundtrack of heavy and black metal (Soulfly, Darkthrone), English electro-rock (Goldfrapp, Death in Vegas), and millennial post-punk (Sonic Youth contributes eight songs) for a time capsule of a sonic ride through this uncertain, newly paved, intangible terrain. We’re not entirely sure what Jean Baudrillard would think about Assayas’ neo-noir for a burgeoning digital age and its ever-present reminder of our slow, blind march into the simulacra – but he would certainly have choice phrases about the despicable culture Assayas so brutally predicts.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2002, 35mm, 129 min.

Clean

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3/26 - 4:45PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

The world revealed in Olivier Assayas’ films – cosmopolitan, kinetic, and ever-shrinking – has never felt more personal than it does in 2004‘s Clean, a wrenching and redemptive portrait of addiction. Clean finds the director working again with Irma Vep star Maggie Cheung (whose bracing multi-lingual performance earned a Best Actress award at Cannes) to tell the story of Emily, a former junkie struggling to collect the fragments of her life after the overdose of her rock-star lover. Aided by Eric Gautier’s brilliant, restless handheld cinematography, Assayas propels Cheung through crowded rock clubs, bustling restaurants and the dense urban landscapes of Paris and London, drawing both on her emotional depth and on the singular physicality that made her a Hong Kong action star. Perfectly cast as her bereaved father-in-law, Nick Nolte balances her desperation with wounded stoicism; the study in vulnerability that emerges between them is one of Assayas’ starkest and most moving.

Dir. Olivier Assayas, 2004, 35mm, 111 min.

April Fool's Day

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3/31 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Before Scream knocked the genre into the realm of post modernism, Fred Walton’s April Fool’s Day was the definitive deconstruction of the slasher film. Riding high on a cresting wave of holiday-themed killers, Walton’s film is a deft comedy with enough scares and kills to satisfy horror fans while also boasting production values that far exceed most low budget fare of the era. Also surprising is the cast of notables; Deborah “Valley Girl” Foreman, Amy “Friday the 13th Part 2″ Steele, Thomas “Back to the Future” Wilson and Ryan O’Neal’s son Griffin who was later convicted for manslaughter in the death of Francis Ford Coppola’s son! A rollicking genre-bender with a killer twist, this 80s classic demands to be celebrated every April 1st, so don’t be a fool – join us!

Dir. Fred Walton, 1986, 35mm, 89 min.

1984

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4/4 - 7:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

In an age of alternative facts and challenges to civil liberties, together we must now do the daunting work of remembering a world that gave way to the infamous Big Brother, and what fate belied those who questioned Him. Please join The Cinefamily – and almost 90 other independent theaters across North America – on April 4th, 2017, as we screen this necessary and unflinching work in solidarity with those like Winston Smith (the late John Hurt), who love – and in loving, resist.

An eminent work like “1984,” oft-memed darling of English classes everywhere, is brought to a bleak apotheosis in Michael Radford’s (yes,1984) film adaptation. With its rote violence, its paralyzing portrayals of Orwell’s two-way telescreens – from which both public praise and hangings are administered ad insanium – and a palate that invokes only mud, we become privy and then prisoner to the normalization of a humanity traumatized by power. As Richard Burton – in his final performance, as INGSOC Party brainwasher O’Brien – taunts, “‘If you want a vision of the future … imagine a boot stamping on a human face forever.’”

Dir. Michael Radford, 1984, digital presentation, 113 min.

Tickets: Free w/ RSVP (first-come, first serve). Donation to the ACLU suggested.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Also, as Cinefamily is a non-profit, all of our donating 1-year Black Card members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

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