Harold and Maude

harold and maude2
6/24 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“I don’t like to tell lies.” -Hal Ashby

In the words of Greg Proops, this is the movie we need right now: While Orange 45 confuses and depresses us with chaos and misrule, we can grab life by the neck and give it a big kiss. Harold is a young man who doesn’t want to live. Maude is an older woman who has a talent for living. They meet at a funeral and the fun begins there. The quirky and intelligent Hal Ashby (Being There, Coming Home) made a poignant, romantic film that wasn’t initially a hit but became the very definition of a cult classic. Written by Colin Higgins (9 to 5), Harold and Maude is an amazingly moving comedy about life, love, loss, and family. Maude is a cheerleader for living your life, doing her best to persuade the suicidal Harold of what is important: singing, not respecting authority, and running around the world like a mad person. Ruth Gordon is delightful and wise as Maude, and Bud Cort, for better or worse, defined his career with his brilliant take on the morbid Harold. Come down to the movies with your friend or date and have some popcorn and soda and laugh and cry goddammit. LIVE, LIVE! Otherwise, you got nothing to talk about in the locker room.

Dir. Hal Ashby, 1971, 35mm, 91 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses6
6/24 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Alice in Wonderland: An X-rated Musical Fantasy

alice x rated
6/24 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

The makers of the softcore hit Flesh Gordon returned with this naughty, notorious musical comedy featuring sweet ‘70s starlet Kristine DeBell (Meatballs) banging, blowing, and finger-fiddling her way through Lewis Carroll’s goofy gallery of beloved characters. Sweet librarian Alice gets cold feet about going all the way with her boyfriend and follows the White Rabbit (played by a pseudonymous Larry Gelman from “The Bob Newhart Show”) into a Wonderland that leaves her a whole lot less inhibited thanks to a filthy Mad Hatter, a skinny and very frisky Tweedledum and Tweedledee, and a nasty Queen of Hearts, among many others. Sweet, witty, and naughty in the way only the ‘70s could be, this nifty time capsule feels like an off-Broadway musical staged by the staff of Penthouse. Don’t bring the kiddies to come and see a side of Alice that Tim Burton and Disney would never, ever dare show you.

Dir. Bud Townsend, 1976, 35mm, 81 min.

Watch the trailer!

Freeway

MSDFREE EC006
6/25 - 8PM
$12/free for members

“Mix together one cup of Natural Born Killers with a half-cup of Los Olvidados, sprinkle liberally with freeze-dried bile and bake for 98 minutes… [Matthew] Bright, mercifully, is an allegorist who consistently prefers projectiles to platitudes.” – Allan Ulrich, San Francisco Chronicle

Reese Witherspoon struts her stuff in what is easily one of her best performances, as a jailbait Red Riding Hood named Vanessa tearing down the I-5 to see her granny, all the while being stalked by cunning, murderous pervert/child shrink Bob Wolverton (Kiefer Sutherland). This clever, hilarious genre mishmash marked the directorial debut of former Oingo Boingo member Matthew Bright (who co-wrote Forbidden Zone) and is just as wild as you’d expect, in addition to offering a surprisingly effective parable about the corrosion of the American justice system! Don’t miss this rare opportunity to experience this disturbing and weirdly uplifting gem in a theater the way the movie gods intended.

Dir. Matthew Bright, 1996, 35mm, 110 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Meeting People is Easy (encore!)

meetingpeopleiseasy011-640x420
6/25 - 10PM
$12/free for members

This summer marks 20 years since Radiohead unleashed their epochal art-rock masterpiece OK Computer on an unsuspecting world. Thom Yorke’s angst-laden lyrics painted a digitally disconnected age of unease marked by globalization, paranoia, and the wish that aliens would just take us away from it all (sounds about right). It’s precisely this mood of modern melancholy and isolation that documentarian Grant Gee expertly captured with Meeting People Is Easy, a cinematic counterpart so fitting it might as well be OK Computer: The Movie. Impressionistic and wildly experimental, Gee oscillates between film and digital, black & white and hyper-saturated color, double-exposure and time lapse, languid takes and stroboscopic editing to create an appropriately unnerving visualization of both the album’s themes and the band’s mental state. We get a fly-on-the-wall’s eye view as they dodge questions from journalists, hide out in hotel rooms, rehearse and undertake a recording session for an elusive (and still unreleased) song – all interspersed with incredible live performances and moments of naked candor.

Film preceded by a lovingly curated mix of vintage Radiohead favorites and rarities!

Dir. Grant Gee, 1998, 35mm, 99 min.

“Friends of Cinefamily” members-only screening

6/26 - 8PM

For this timeslot, we will be closed to the public, for a special “Friends of Cinefamily” members-only screening. Our members aren’t just film lovers – they’re filmmakers too. These special screenings honor Cinefamily members who have made new films. To find out more and get invited to the next one, become a member here.

The House on Coco Road (with director Damani Baker in person)

House+on+Coco+Road+Press_+DAMANI
6/27 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

“Grenada was a beacon of light for oppressed people all over the world.”
—Angela Davis

Set amidst the Grenada Revolution, The House on Coco Road follows one family’s flight from racial tensions in 1980’s Oakland, California, only to find themselves settled directly in the path of a U.S. military invasion in Grenada. First hand accounts from activists Angela Davis, Fania Davis and Fannie Haughton weave together director Damani Baker’s family portrait of utopic dreams, resistance and civil unrest with music composed by Grammy Award nominated luminary, Meshell Ndegeocello.

Dir. Damani Baker, 2016, DCP, 78 min.

Meeting People is Easy (encore!)

meeting_people_is_easy2
6/27 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

This summer marks 20 years since Radiohead unleashed their epochal art-rock masterpiece OK Computer on an unsuspecting world. Thom Yorke’s angst-laden lyrics painted a digitally disconnected age of unease marked by globalization, paranoia, and the wish that aliens would just take us away from it all (sounds about right). It’s precisely this mood of modern melancholy and isolation that documentarian Grant Gee expertly captured with Meeting People Is Easy, a cinematic counterpart so fitting it might as well be OK Computer: The Movie. Impressionistic and wildly experimental, Gee oscillates between film and digital, black & white and hyper-saturated color, double-exposure and time lapse, languid takes and stroboscopic editing to create an appropriately unnerving visualization of both the album’s themes and the band’s mental state. We get a fly-on-the-wall’s eye view as they dodge questions from journalists, hide out in hotel rooms, rehearse and undertake a recording session for an elusive (and still unreleased) song – all interspersed with incredible live performances and moments of naked candor.

Film preceded by a lovingly curated mix of vintage Radiohead favorites and rarities!

Dir. Grant Gee, 1998, 35mm, 99 min.

Go Nightclubbing's SUICIDE LIVE (1980)

Suicide Live
6/28 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Video artists Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong, in the pre-MTV days from 1977-80, spent their nights documenting New York’s nascent punk and no wave scenes. Armed with portapak cameras, they shot now legendary shows and on-camera interviews, including this amazing Suicide performance.

Conventional wisdom tells us that punk began in ‘75 or ‘76. Not for Suicide, a punk band since 1970. Innovators Alan Vega and Martin Rev put forth the model for the synth duos that went on to dominate the ‘80s – but with their own unmatched style and legendary use of drum machines, organs, and synths. Travel back in time with us for this SUICIDE LIVE show!

Private Rental

6/29 - 6PM

For this timeslot, we will not be open to the public, as some lucky patron has rented our theater — both supporting the Cinefamily and using the beautiful Silent Movie Theatre for their own event. The theater can be yours, too! Weddings, premieres of your film with an on-site afterparty, business-related entertaining, great birthdays, bar or bat mitzvahs, or any other kind of celebration you can imagine — it’s better at the movies. For more information, email “events@cinefamily.org”

L'Atalante

l'atalante
6/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Don’t be fooled by the flying cat gags or that scene where Michel Simon does the Dougie — for all its playfulness, Jean Vigo’s 1934 romance L’Atalante is an obsessively precise work, anchored by a deep reverence for the cinematic craft. The only feature of Vigo’s abbreviated career (tuberculosis), L’Atalante dots a modest storyline with scenes of jaw-dropping visual reverie so tonally and rhythmically sophisticated they might pass for the contemporary work of any of the more aesthetically open-handed modern auteurs (think Nicolas Winding Refn, Alfonso Cuarón, Barry Jenkins). As on all his films, Vigo here enlists cinematographer Boris Kaufman, the youngest brother of Soviet documentarian Dziga Vertov, with whom the young Pole shared a delighted fascination with the unique technical potential of film. Despite mannered performances entirely typical of the pre-Method era, Juliette (Dita Parlo) and Jean’s (Jean Dasté) tempestuous honeymoon comes brightly to life on screen, largely thanks to Kaufman’s dynamic camera, which plies the decks of the titular vessel and its lovers’ tangled bodies with startling intimacy.

Dir. Jean Vigo, 1934, 35mm, 89 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses2
6/30 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

valerie and her week of wonders
6/30 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

As joyful as it is impossible to pin down, Valerie is a haunting, psychoactive period piece which plunges the beautiful heroine Valerie into a phantasmagorical world of thirsty vampires, the dark arts, and dreamy free love — all set to one of the great film scores of the era, a cocktail of psych-folk and avant-garde classical by the great Lubos Fiser. The film opens with 13-year-old Valerie’s first menstruation and subsequent sexual awakening, her unsteady discovery of which lets loose a torrent of quixotic, hallucinatory experiences both terrifying and beautiful; amongst a haze of shifting tones and a flurry of role reversals and Gothic nightmares in broad daylight, Valerie floats along, buoyed by the fears and fantasies that come with nascent sexuality and teenage fantasy. This bewitching brew is a must to behold on 35mm — do not miss it.

Dir. Jaromil Jires, 1970, 35mm, 77 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Super Heroes

SMC Heroes
7/1 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

Look up in the sky! Is it a bird? Is it a plane? NO! It’s this month’s crime-fighting, justice-preserving, gadget-wielding cartoons! From heroes to mutants – who battle villains both sympathetic and sociopathic – caped crusaders were around long before Christian Bale was Batman. Underdogs and dark-winged ducks, Batmen and Wonder Women – cartoon superheroes taught us about right and wrong, bravery and cowardice, and how to rock tights and still look good.

Saturday Morning Cartoons have always had superheroes at their core, and we are very proud to give them their time in the bat-signal spotlight.

Complimentary all-you-can-eat cereal bar. Pajamas encouraged.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses3
7/1 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Funeral Parade of Roses

funeralparadeofroses5
7/2 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Stalker

stalker
7/3 - 4PM
$12/free for members

“Perhaps it was in Stalker that I felt for the first time the need to indicate clearly and unequivocally the supreme value by which, as they say, man lives.” – Andrei Tarkovsky

One of the greatest films of all time – and perhaps the single greatest science fiction film – Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker has long been both a rarity and a touchstone. Smartly flipping a common trope of post-nuclear anxieties, the film follows three men – known simply as Stalker (Aleksandr Kaydanovskiy), Writer (Anatoliy Solonitsyn), and Professor (Nikolai Grinko) – into a government-controlled lockdown zone in search of a room capable of granting its visitors’ innermost desires. With stunning visuals and almost impossible philosophical scope, Tarkovsky enshrouds religious allegory and political anxieties in quiet realism, constructing a dialogic meditation on art, faith, religion, and love. Thanks to a new restoration from Janus Films, this staple of the cinematic canon once again graces the big screen.

Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979, DCP, 161 min.

Dick

dick7
7/3 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Let’s escape in our time machines, if only for a night, to remember just how far we haven’t come as a nation… all through a good, old-fashioned American skewering of perhaps the greatest bureaucratic scandal in our nation’s history: that hilarious bungle, Watergate! Post-The Craft Andrew Fleming employs teenaged, Bobby Sherman-infatuated Michelle Williams and Kirsten Dunst as his ditzy proxies through which to reimagine the genesis of famed informant Deep Throat in this late-90s, pre-Dubya, pitch-perfect political parody. As if our leading ladies weren’t enough of a star-studded sell, Dick also boasts the talents of Will Ferrell and Kids in the Hall’s Bruce McCulloch as Washington Post “radical muckraking bastards” Woodward and Bernstein, Teri Garr, Dave Foley, Ryan Reynolds, and, in perhaps the most brilliant casting turn in decades, Dan Hedaya as Tricky Dick Nixon. Never underestimate the power – flower or otherwise – of a female teenager scorned.

Dir. Andrew Fleming, 1999, 35mm, 94 min.

Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

valerie and her week of wonders
7/3 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

As joyful as it is impossible to pin down, Valerie is a haunting, psychoactive period piece which plunges the beautiful heroine Valerie into a phantasmagorical world of thirsty vampires, the dark arts, and dreamy free love — all set to one of the great film scores of the era, a cocktail of psych-folk and avant-garde classical by the great Lubos Fiser. The film opens with 13-year-old Valerie’s first menstruation and subsequent sexual awakening, her unsteady discovery of which lets loose a torrent of quixotic, hallucinatory experiences both terrifying and beautiful; amongst a haze of shifting tones and a flurry of role reversals and Gothic nightmares in broad daylight, Valerie floats along, buoyed by the fears and fantasies that come with nascent sexuality and teenage fantasy. This bewitching brew is a must to behold on 35mm — do not miss it.

Dir. Jaromil Jires, 1970, 35mm, 77 min.

Stalker

stalker 1
7/4 - 4PM
$12/free for members

“Perhaps it was in Stalker that I felt for the first time the need to indicate clearly and unequivocally the supreme value by which, as they say, man lives.” – Andrei Tarkovsky

One of the greatest films of all time – and perhaps the single greatest science fiction film – Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker has long been both a rarity and a touchstone. Smartly flipping a common trope of post-nuclear anxieties, the film follows three men – known simply as Stalker (Aleksandr Kaydanovskiy), Writer (Anatoliy Solonitsyn), and Professor (Nikolai Grinko) – into a government-controlled lockdown zone in search of a room capable of granting its visitors’ innermost desires. With stunning visuals and almost impossible philosophical scope, Tarkovsky enshrouds religious allegory and political anxieties in quiet realism, constructing a dialogic meditation on art, faith, religion, and love. Thanks to a new restoration from Janus Films, this staple of the cinematic canon once again graces the big screen.

Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979, DCP, 161 min.

Stalker

stalker 2
7/4 - 8PM
$12/free for members

“Perhaps it was in Stalker that I felt for the first time the need to indicate clearly and unequivocally the supreme value by which, as they say, man lives.” – Andrei Tarkovsky

One of the greatest films of all time – and perhaps the single greatest science fiction film – Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker has long been both a rarity and a touchstone. Smartly flipping a common trope of post-nuclear anxieties, the film follows three men – known simply as Stalker (Aleksandr Kaydanovskiy), Writer (Anatoliy Solonitsyn), and Professor (Nikolai Grinko) – into a government-controlled lockdown zone in search of a room capable of granting its visitors’ innermost desires. With stunning visuals and almost impossible philosophical scope, Tarkovsky enshrouds religious allegory and political anxieties in quiet realism, constructing a dialogic meditation on art, faith, religion, and love. Thanks to a new restoration from Janus Films, this staple of the cinematic canon once again graces the big screen.

Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979, DCP, 161 min.

Stalker

stalker 3
7/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“Perhaps it was in Stalker that I felt for the first time the need to indicate clearly and unequivocally the supreme value by which, as they say, man lives.” – Andrei Tarkovsky

One of the greatest films of all time – and perhaps the single greatest science fiction film – Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker has long been both a rarity and a touchstone. Smartly flipping a common trope of post-nuclear anxieties, the film follows three men – known simply as Stalker (Aleksandr Kaydanovskiy), Writer (Anatoliy Solonitsyn), and Professor (Nikolai Grinko) – into a government-controlled lockdown zone in search of a room capable of granting its visitors’ innermost desires. With stunning visuals and almost impossible philosophical scope, Tarkovsky enshrouds religious allegory and political anxieties in quiet realism, constructing a dialogic meditation on art, faith, religion, and love. Thanks to a new restoration from Janus Films, this staple of the cinematic canon once again graces the big screen.

Dir. Andrei Tarkovsky, 1979, DCP, 161 min.

Our Nixon

our nixon
7/6 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

We love all things archival, and Our Nixon, with its deft blend of humor and historical reflection, is one of the very best feature-length found footage films we’ve yet seen. The time-honored tale of the Oval Office in the ‘60s and ‘70s has been covered from a wide swath of angles, but you’ve never seen it delivered with humanizing, penetrating reality until now. Painstakingly sculpted from tens of thousands of hours’ worth of unearthed Super-8 home movies shot by Richard Nixon’s closest aides, Our Nixon emerges as one of 2013’s most engaging dramedies, capturing both seismic, world-changing events, and previously invisible domestic tableaux. The raw materials of this unique and personal visual record, created by H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman, and Dwight Chapin, were seized by the FBI during Watergate, filed away at the National Archives and forgotten for almost forty years. Obsessively documenting their experiences on film, these idealistic, dedicated young turks had no idea that just a few years later they’d all be in prison. They filmed because they thought that Nixon’s presidency would change the world forever — they were right.

Dir. Penny Lane, 2013, digital presentation, 84 min.

Moral Tales: The Bakery Girl of Monceau & Suzanne’s Career at Zebulon

bakerygirl3-1600x900-c-default
7/6 - 8PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

This event will take place at Zebulon, located at 2478 Fletcher Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90039. Doors open at 7pm, show at 8pm.

After party with DJs Mark Wright and Jessica Hardy from Décadanse Soirée

The Bakery Girl of Monceau

A frustrated romantic of a law student is torn between Sylvie, a spectral art gallery assistant, and Jacqueline, a coarse bakery shopgirl. Rohmer finds ethereal, universal themes of lust within a few square blocks – summoning the power of cinema to render the everyday bustle of Paris a staging ground for an obsessive drama. The first Moral Tale is pure Nouvelle Vague: shot guerilla-style on 16mm in the back alleys of the 8th arrondissement, delectably local, and featuring narration by fellow film titan Bertrand Tavernier.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1963, digital presentation, 23 min.

Suzanne’s Career

Rohmer has a gift for spotlighting idiosyncratic behavior – the unpracticed snowflake-qualities of real people that are usually lost on-screen, beneath layers of dramatic training and self-awareness. In the Moral Tales’ second episode, Rohmer develops his effortless blend of a novelist’s diary-style storytelling with naturalistic, acutely observed, and often contradictory human behavior. The result is raw and funny, tripping loosely around the lives of middle-class college students in a vivid time capsule of Paris’s Latin Quarter in the early ’60s. The young unknowns who fill out Suzanne’s Career really seem like college freshmen; babies in grown-up bodies opting for ill-conceived romances and failing their classes with the charming self-absorption of teenagers.

Dir. Éric Rohmer 1963, digital presentation, 54 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

8BALL TV featuring The Sixth Side of the Pentagon

sixth-face-stop-the-war-hand
7/6 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

“If the five sides of the pentagon appear impregnable, attack the sixth side.”
-Zen Proverb

On October 27, 1967, tens of thousands of protesters gathered in Washington, D.C. for the Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam. It was the largest protest gathering yet – a motley band of liberals, radicals, hippies, and Yippies. Among the thousands, Chris Marker led a team of filmmakers who both bore witness to this historic event, and captured a cultural moment through which images and criticism transformed (in the words of protesters) into direct action. With Marker’s patented sincerity of vision and wry commentary, Sixth Side less analyzes the politics of a time, than it purveys the mark history makes on the present.

Five decades later, on the occasion of Donald Trump’s Inauguration, 8BALL TV was launched. As a global public access station committed to the proliferation of political and experimental filmmaking, 8BALL echoes the demands of the protestors Marker documented: engagement, unification, and community. In this tradition, 8BALL TV provides a platform where the voices of emerging and established filmmakers from around the globe can be heard. Join us for the first public screening of work from 8BALL TV contributors, as well as Sixth Side, as we look to engage with our history, our communities, and the screen in new ways.

This program is curated by and co-presented with FACTS.

The Sixth Side of the Pentagon, dir. Chris Marker, 1967, digibeta, 26 min.

Scum

Scum1
7/7 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

Nasty Habits

nasty habits
7/7 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Leave it to the British to deliver the sharpest skewering of American politics; Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s 1977 Nasty Habits, an adaptation of Muriel Spark’s The Abbess of Crewe, manages to gather both the absurdity of Watergate and the callousness of religious hypocrisy into the same satirical net by transposing our country’s greatest scandal – at least until now – on to a power-play at a wealthy Philadelphia abbey. Glenda Jackson, in the “Nixon” role, anchors the piece with a finely-measured comedic performance, her arched-eyebrow scheming and erudite, with two-faced tyranny worthy of the best cinema villains. The rest of the cast, great female character performers filling out analogs for the Nixon administration, are equally possessed by the holy spirit of satire, relishing in the blasphemous fun of playing nuns breaking bad. With Geraldine Page, Sandy Dennis, Eli Wallach, and Rip Torn.

Dir. Michael Lindsay-Hogg, 1977, 35mm, 96 min.

Eve's Leaves

Eve'sLeaves001_0
7/8 - 2PM
$12/free for members

With live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick

After parting ways with Famous Players-Lasky (Paramount) in early 1925, famed director Cecil B. DeMille decided to try his own hand at playing studio boss, and began production on several films – including Eve’s Leaves. Based on the play by Harry Chapman Ford and directed by Paul Sloane, the film follows a sea captain who forces his daughter Eve (Leatrice Joy) to masquerade as a boy. Eve responds by provoking widespread mischief aboard her father’s tramp freighter (ironically named “The Garden of Eden”). While the plot is laden with melodrama, it is comedy that forms the true heart of this movie. William Boyd, who would later achieve greater fame as cowboy hero Hopalong Cassidy, is commendable as the object of Eve’s desire; but while their combined screen chemistry is palpable (as witnessed in the truly memorable “apple-kissing” scene), it is Joy’s ebullient performance that ultimately steals the show.

Dir. Paul Sloane, 1926, 35mm, 75 min.

Moral Tales: La Collectionneuse

La Collectionneuse
7/8 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

Witty, philosophical, erotic, and true to life, La Collectionneuse is like a dream-vision of the summer vacation in the south of France you never had. As contradictory, sensual, and sardonic as its languid heroes, the film throws a spotlight on small moments of romantic caprice or boredom, and practically heralds the new, bohemian style of dandyism as it emerged in the ’60s: voluntary unemployment, casual sex, avant-garde philosophy, pop music, and comic books. As he staged these gorgeous Côte d’Azur-set scenes, Rohmer obsessed himself with authenticity: visual artist Daniel Pommereulle plays himself and co-wrote the dialogue with the other two leads, and the filmmaker himself called around for collectors of insect noises to find the right species for Saint-Tropez in June.

Though made third, La Collectionneuse was conceived of as Moral Tale number four; it was made with an exceptionally limited budget while Rohmer waited for Jean-Louis Trintignant to be available for My Night at Maud‘s.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1967, DCP, 89 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Scum

Scum2
7/8 - 8PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

Funeral Parade of Roses

FuneralParadeofRoses6
7/8 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Long unavailable in the U.S., director Toshio Matsumoto’s shattering, kaleidoscopic masterpiece is one of the most subversive and intoxicating films of the late 1960s: a headlong dive into a dazzling, unseen Tokyo night-world of drag queen bars and fabulous divas, fueled by booze, drugs, fuzz guitars, performance art, and black mascara. No less than Stanley Kubrick cited the film as a direct influence on his own dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange. An unknown club dancer at the time, transgender actor Peter (from Kurosawa’s Ran) gives an astonishing Edie Sedgwick/Warhol superstar-like performance as hot young thing Eddie, hostess at Bar Genet – where she’s ignited a violent love-triangle with reigning drag queen Leda (Osamu Ogasawara) for the attentions of club owner Gonda (played by Kurosawa regular Yoshio Tsuchiya, from Seven Samurai and Yojimbo). One of Japan’s leading experimental filmmakers, Matsumoto bends and distorts time here like Resnais in Last Year at Marienbad, freely mixing documentary interviews, Brechtian film-within-a-film asides, Oedipal premonitions of disaster, his own avant-garde shorts, and even on-screen cartoon balloons, into a dizzying whirl of image and sound. Featuring breathtaking black-and-white cinematography by Tatsuo Suzuki that rivals the photographs of Robert Mapplethorpe, Funeral Parade offers a frank, openly erotic, and unapologetic portrait of an underground community of drag queens. A key work of the Japanese New Wave and of queer cinema, Funeral Parade has been beautifully restored in 4k from the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements for re-release by Cinelicious Pics and The Cinefamily.

Dir. Toshio Matsumoto, 1969, DCP, 107 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Scum

Scum3
7/9 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

Scum

Scum6
7/10 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

The Doug Benson Movie Interruption: Beauty and the Beast

beauty and the beast
7/11 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and friends (who in the past have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the couches, mics in hand, and say whatever pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen. This month’s pick is Beauty and the Beast!

Dir. Bill Condon, 2017, DCP, 129 min.

Scum

Scum1
7/11 - 11PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

Scum

Scum2
7/12 - 10:45PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

Scum

Scum3
7/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Criminally under known in the US, maverick filmmaker Alan Clarke was a thick scar on the visage of Margaret Thatcher’s Britain; concurrently hyperreal and surreal, Clarke’s films were explosive, scathing investigations into the darkest underbellies of British society, and inspired a generation of filmmakers from Harmony Korine to Gus Van Sant. There may be no better film to introduce new fans to his work than his early masterpiece, Scum. Starring a young and dynamic Ray Winstone as Carlin, a new inmate in a “borstal” – a youth detention facility – this highly controversial landmark of British cinema was originally made for the BBC, but was banned for its graphic depictions of suicide, rape, riots, and racism, and continued to be relatively underseen in the US and UK alike, partially due to obscenity lawsuits filed against any television network or VHS company who dared pick it up. The film’s violent immediacy culminates in Carlin’s retaliation sequence: the camera absorbing him in one of Clarke’s signature, haunting long-takes, as he exacts revenge with a pool ball-filled sock, seizes power, and declares “I’m the daddy now!”

Dir. Alan Clarke, 1979, DCP, 96 min.

Mystery Meat #2

Mystery-Meat-web-listing-question
7/13 - 10:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

From Cinefamily’s very beginnings, one of our greatest loves has been the joy of discovery — the extreme curio factor — the “what the hell am I watching?!” feeling that envelops us like a cocoon whenever we stumble across celluloid of unknown artistic origins. Running Cinefamily brings a game of limitations, though — in particular, what we’re doing is intended for an “audience.” But what about the films made for no one? The ones we want to show “just because”? And what about the ones we’ve never even seen ourselves, but sound so out-there that we simply must screen them, just to find out – films too difficult to parse from their flaws, too confusing, too challenging, or just too damn strange. It’s all part of the fun.

We don’t promise these films will be “good.” We offer them with no explanations, no justifications, no apologies, and no refunds. And we won’t even tell you what they are. Welcome to Mystery Meat.

Warning: These screenings are not for civilians.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Death Line (aka Raw Meat, w/ Gary Sherman, David Ladd, and Paul Maslansky in person)

death_line7
7/14 - 10:30PM
$14/free for members

Restored director’s cut!

A good cannibal film is best when rare, and for many years there was none rarer than Death Line, or as it was known here in the states, Raw Meat. Thankfully, due to home video, horror fans have been able to discover Gary Sherman’s wondrously bleak and gruesome 70s shocker, finally unearthed from its subterranean depths. The set-up is absolutely brilliant – far beneath the London streets, in Victorian catacombs, the last of a lineage of cannibals (the terrifyingly feral Hugh Armstrong, in a role nearly played by Marlon Brando!) prowls for fresh meat, pursued by a police detective played by the great Donald Pleasance. Sherman masterfully milks his setting for suffocating claustrophobia and dread, climaxing in a stomach-wrenching, gore-shock of an ending that will burn itself into your mind forever… and possibly leave you with some unholy cravings of your own. Join us for this filmic feast in the rarest of presentations – on the big screen!

Dir. Gary Sherman, 1972, DCP, 87 min.

Moral Tales: My Night at Maud’s

My Night at Maud's
7/15 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

With a DJ set by Jim Smith from The Smell

My Night at Maud’s is one of those movies with truly great dialogue – the kind of late-night heart-to-hearting and waxing philosophical that you recognize more from life than from other movies. Deep-dives that wantonly break the “sex/politics/religion” rule and life-like skirmishes played out awkwardly via unspoken social cues will make you laugh or wince with recognition. Rohmer remains obsessively devoted to wrapping reality up in fiction, casting a Marxist to play a Marxist and intertwining his protagonist’s romantic troubles with the writings of mathematician-philosopher Blaise Pascal. If that sounds pretentious and unromantic, Rohmer knows it – his specialty is in vain male heroes bumbling through tangled webs of self-deception. With the third (but fourth released) Moral Tale, the formula finally won him a breakout success, garnering praise at Cannes and even penetrating mainstream theaters in the U.S., where Rohmer landed his only Oscar nomination. It introduced Rohmer to America as the New Wave’s most understated master – novelistic, quietly satirical, and a keen observer of the subtle beauty and absurdity of human behavior.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1969, 35mm, 110 min.

Print courtesy of the Institut Français. Special thanks to the Cultural services of the French Embassy.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

All the President's Men

All_The_Presidents_Men
7/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Part of our Impeach the President: Watergate on Film series

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for All the President’s Men.

Greg sez: The crowning achievement of Alan J. Pakula’s Paranoid trilogy (Klute, Parallax View). Two sexy reporters, (Robert Redford and his groovy 70’s hair and Dustin Hoffman playing it low-key with a mullet ) are thrown together by their gruff-but-lovable editor, (the gruff-but-lovable Jason Robards) to uncover mayhem, skullduggery, and corruption at the Imperial Nixon White House. Hellbent on the scoop, they press and lie and wheedle and have furtive secret meetings with anonymous sources played by a dazzling array of character actors in parlors and car parks. All evidence leads to one conclusion: the President is a spying, duplicitous, maniac surrounded by corrupt henchman. No one will be seated till someone is impeached.

Dir. Alan J. Pakula, 1976, 35mm, 138 min.

All the President's Men

7/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Night of the Creeps (with director Fred Dekker in person)

night of the creeps2
7/21 - 10PM
$14/free for members

Director’s cut!

Though it was overlooked during the busy summer movie schedule of 1986, Fred Dekker’s Night of the Creeps has gone on to become a quintessential cult classic. A loving homage to the B movies of the 1950s, Dekker’s winningly gruesome horror comedy mashes up elements of atomic age sci-fi, Romero zombies, slashers, and 80s teen comedy, magically landing on a recipe for pure fun. Leads Jason Lively and Steve Marshall have a great rapport as best buds dealing with a campus infested with space slug-controlled zombie schoolmates, with B movie leading man Tom Atkins bringing the funny as the quipping alcoholic detective who finds himself caught up in the madness, leading to some of the film’s irresistibly quotable lines. A perfect summer movie, Night of the Creeps has proved highly influential, inspiring James Gunn’s pre-Guardians of the Galaxy creepfest, Slither. The good news is that we’re throwing a rare screening of the director’s cut with special guests… the bad news is that they’re dead!

Dir. Fred Dekker, 1986, DCP, 88 min.

Kuso

kuso1
7/21 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

Moral Tales: Claire's Knee

clairesknee-2
7/22 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

“Something close to a perfect film… Claire’s Knee unfolds like an elegant fairy tale in a series of enchanted and enchanting encounters, on the lake, in gardens heavy with blossoms, in interiors that look like Vermeers… it is so funny and so moving, so immaculately realized, that almost any ordinary attempt to describe it must, I think, in some way diminish it,” wrote The New York Times‘ Vincent Canby in 1971.

Arguably Rohmer’s masterpiece, the fifth installment of his Moral Tales sextuplet, Claire’s Knee, traces the lustful pangs of Jérôme, a diplomat stationed at Lake Annecy in Western France, as he encounters and muses with Aurora, a wizened novelist, and two teenage girls. Unfolding in a novelistic, stream-of-consciousness style across July 1970, Claire’s Knee achieves as close to pure heartbeat-editing as ever attempted in French cinema. The moody photography (Rohmer’s second film in color) is utterly entrancing; the performances deftly subtle; the drama purely human. Canby placed the film within the company of Intolerance, Rear Window, and My Darling Clementine – works that not only attest to the power of the cinematic form, but could only exist because of it.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1970, 35mm, 105 min.

Print courtesy of the Institut Français. Special thanks to the Cultural services of the French Embassy.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Kuso

kuso2
7/22 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

Série noire

serie noire
7/23 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Patrick Dewaere, one of the most talented French comic actors of the 70s, may have the saddest face in cinema. Known in the US mainly for his terrific performances in Bertrand Blier’s hit absurdist comedies Going Places and Get Out Your Handkerchiefs, Dewaere was a human “Pierrot” (the iconic sad clown of French theatre and Italian Commedia dell’arte) who found a neurotic humor in his own very real fragility; tragically, Dewaere’s own battles with depression culminated in his eventual suicide in 1982. This makes Serié noire one of the most simultaneously emotionally affecting and tragic of Jim Thompson’s adaptations (by Georges Perec, no less). In the Thompson cavalcade of misanthropists, nihilists, and misogynists, one feels Dewaere’s desperation to be a hero, as he ends up just another pathetic sucker, impotent against the fates and destined to be eaten by bigger and smarter fish, with no morals, instead of few. A rare screening on 35mm of an overlooked gem.

Dir. Alain Corneau, 1979, 35mm, 111 min.

Kuso

kuso3
7/23 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

Kuso

kuso1
7/24 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

Kuso

kuso2
7/25 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

Kuso

kuso3
7/26 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

The Untamed

THE UNTAMED
7/27 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Take a healthy dose of sexually charged interpersonal drama, mix in some Lovecraft by way of Zulawski’s Possession and stew in a broth of Mexican mysticism and you have Amat Escalante’s The Untamed. Following up his critical darling Heli, Escalante, a supernova among Mexico City’s new wave of rising star directors, has a flawless sense of tone, deftly balancing the light and dark of his character’s explosive personal lives with shocking cosmic weirdness, body horror, and graphic sex. In exploring the interplay between machismo, homophobia and closeted homosexuality, as framed in Latin culture, the film becomes both a literal and metaphorical monster movie, its tentacled, pleasure-offering creature a corporeal manifestation of the characters’ tortured quest for satisfaction of both body and spirit. More than mere provocation, Escalante’s vision is every bit as honest as it is horrifying and beautiful, a bold cinematic voice that is sure to find an international audience.

Dir. Amat Escalante, 2016, DCP, 100 min.

Kuso

kuso1
7/27 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

“The grossest movie ever made.” –The Verge

“Those who walked out were completely right to do so… Kuso is destined to be legendary.” –The Film Stage

“I tried to warn folks.” –Flying Lotus

Get ready for Kuso, Steve Ellison aka Flying Lotus’ film debut, and the latest entry in midnight movie history – a challenging, perverse, free-jazz, body horror psycho-scape of epic and disgusting proportions. In a series of sketches featuring a cast of funkadelic freakazoids and comic maniacs – from George Clinton to Tim Heidecker and Hannibal Buress – and with animations by Newgrounds pioneer David Firth, Kuso is a visual feast – just a rotting, putrid, and otherworldly one that that would make Matthew Barney queasy. Only playing at midnight.

Dir. Flying Lotus, 2017, DCP, 105 min.

Moral Tales: Love in the Afternoon

Love in the Afternoon
7/29 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

With a DJ set by Jim Smith from The Smell

“I dream of a life comprised of first loves and last loves…” muses Bernard Verley’s satiated Parisian lawyer in Rohmer’s final Moral Tale – at once the funniest, most probing, and arguably greatest of the series. Verley assures us, of course, that his wandering eye is purely part of his escapist routine, much like his beloved novels: fancies and fancies alone, that ultimately affirm his fidelity. That is, until his will is tested by après-midi encounters with Chloé, played by the iconic model and socialite Zouzou, whose free-wheeling, laissez-faire lifestyle offers an escape hatch from his comfortable bourgeois existence. Rohmer and his trusted cinematographer Nestor Almendros (Days of Heaven, frequent Truffaut collaborator) working at the height of their powers, marry refined classicism with the post-Nouvelle Vague‘s loose naturalism – a collection of stolen moments and cinematic reveries, like the story itself. After years of investigating the nature of male lust, Rohmer reaches a peace with monogamy in the film’s climax: that though we can’t stop ourselves from wanting what we don’t need, we may be surprised at how much we need what we don’t want.

Dir. Éric Rohmer, 1972, 35mm, 97 min.

Print courtesy of the Institut Français. Special thanks to the Cultural services of the French Embassy.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Secret Honor (with Philip Baker-Hall in person!)

SHon3
8/1 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

A loaded revolver, a bottle of whiskey, a tape recorder, and a fleet of surveillance monitors: these are Nixon’s only friends in one of Robert Altman’s criminally underseen masterpiece. Phillip Baker Hall’s Nixon broods, sputters, and rants – recounting with frustration and paranoia his life and disgraced career – in a single, unbroken monologue (interrupted chiefly by Dick telling his inanimate interlocutor, “Roberto, erase that” as he rambles into absurdist tangents). Originally written for the stage by a political dramatist and a former NSA and DOJ lawyer, Secret Honor counter-mythologizes Nixon, imagining him as a paid shill for a greater American political conspiracy, with Watergate as the public-facing controversy which hid from view the “real” corruption behind the throne. A favorite of Paul Thomas Anderson (who later cast Hall in Sydney, Boogie Nights, and Magnolia), Altman’s enrapturing investigation of power is also an ancestor of the independent film movement – shot on a shoestring budget for his filmmaking class at the University of Michigan – a visual exercise in space, pacing, and restraint.

Print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive.

Dir. Robert Altman, 1984, 35mm, 90 min.

The Tenant

the tenant
8/4 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Of Roman Polanski’s noted apartment trilogy – which also includes Repulsion and Rosemary’s Baby, his 1976 capper The Tenant is often given the least attention, which is a shame as it may be his most personal and harrowing. A Kafkaesque descent into madness and paranoia, the film concerns the claustrophobic apartment-based interactions of a Parisian transplant, played by an uncredited Polanski himself, and the neighbors who may or may not be conspiring against him. Aside from the flop-sweat-inducing tension and palpable sense of escalating panic, the film is a dizzying whirlwind of subtext, both sexual and political – and the sort of perfectly focused tonal pastiche that only a master with Polanski’s skill could pull off. With Melvyn Douglas, Shelly Winters, a bewitching Isabelle Adjani, and a shock ending that is as hilarious as it is horrifying, The Tenant will take up permanent residency in your shattered nerves.

Dir. Roman Polanski, 1976, 35mm, 126 min.

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Origins

SMC Origins
8/5 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

This month we’re going back into the archives and looking at origins – that means pilot episodes, first appearances of our favorite characters, and the origin stories that formed the worlds we love. Saturday morning ‘toons were foundational for so many of us, so we’ll be revisiting our own origins too, as we travel back to when we first let cartoons into our hearts and minds. This celebration of firsts will feature notable beginnings like the first Adventure Time, the first Daffy Duck cartoon, the first time Sylvester bests Tweety, and the origins of Popeye and Olive Oyl’s relationship.

As always, pajamas encouraged. Come hungry, for our complimentary all-you-can-eat cereal bar.

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