The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/22, 7:30pm)

texaschainsawmassacre2_website
7/22 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/22, 10:00pm)

texaschainsawmassacre3_website
7/22 - 10PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
YouTube Preview Image

A Hard Day's Night (7/23)

harddays1_480_309
7/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Directed with raucous, pioneering anything-goes verve by Richard Lester and featuring a slew of iconic pop anthems, including the title track, “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “I Should Have Known Better,” and “If I Fell,” A Hard Day’s Night reconceived the movie musical, exerted an incalculable influence on the music video, and remains one of the most deliriously entertaining movies of all time. Initially conceived as a low-budget cash-in quickie, this gale-force charmer, which hit theaters just three months after the first day’s filming, famously features The Beatles playing wily, exuberant versions of themselves. Presciently, it captures the astonishing moment when they both officially became the singular, irreverent idols of their generation and changed music forever. And, the style that Lester lays down — one which VitaMixes together old-school slapstick, European art film techniques and TV commercial zazz — is the perfect compliment to the group’s own timeless energy. Bring a friend, a loved one, the parents, grandparents, the kids; round up the whole gang to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of this exhilarating classic.
Dir. Richard Lester, 1964, DCP, 87 min.

To watch the trailer for “A Hard Day’s Night”, visit the top of this series page!

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/23)

texaschainsawmassacre3_website
7/23 - 10PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
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DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: The Case of the Three-Sided Dream (West Coast premiere) + Mabon "Teenie" Hodges: A Portrait of a Memphis Soul Original

caseofthethreesideddream_website
7/24 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“We hope you stay on the case. Don’t get inside the case ’cause if you get inside the case, they’ll shut the case up on you and you’ll never get out again.” — Rahsaan Roland Kirk

“Hendrix idolized him; Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore wore a T-shirt with his picture on it; everyone from the Animals’ Eric Burdon to Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood have given him props as one of the most inspiring jazz musicians of all time.” — Rolling Stone
Rahsaan Roland Kirk was a one of a kind musician, personality, satirist and windmill-slayer who despite being blind, becoming paralyzed, and facing America’s racial injustices — did not relent. His life’s work was exploring sound, as he made music on three horns simultaneously — but beyond that, he was an outspoken activist who started a political movement to get more exposure for jazz in America, particularly on TV. At the age of 40, at the apex of his career, Rahsaan suffered a stroke which left him half paralyzed. Despite this, he continued to tour and play music, with the use of only one hand, literally until the day he died. Filmmaker Adam Kahan digs through the blind multi-instrumentalist’s early life, his musical career and his penchant for fuelling his far-out improvisations on wax with a sense of social justice. Filmmaker Adam Kahan in person! Plus, our program begins with Mabon “Teenie” Hodges — A Portrait of a Memphis Soul Original, the new half-hour doc on the late close collaborator of Al Green.
The Case of the Three-Sided Dream Dir. Adam Kahan, 2013, DCP, 88 min.
Mabon “Teenie” Hodges: A Portrait of a Memphis Soul Original Dir. Susanna Vapnek, 2013, digital presentation, 34 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Case of the Three-Sided Dream”
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DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Beautiful Noise (second encore, filmmakers in person!)

beautifulnoise_web
7/24 - 10:45PM
$12/free for members

Director Eric Green & producer Sarah Ogletree in person! “An in-depth exploration of the dense, sensuous, and extremely loud movement in ‘80s/’90s U.K. rock tagged “shoegaze” by the British press. Tracing its influences back to the Cocteau Twins’ ethereal ambiance and the Jesus and Mary Chain’s brash guitar sound, the film explores how bands like My Bloody Valentine, Ride and Lush fused these two disparate sounds together to create a distinctive, new musical style that furthered the genre’s ideals of sonic experimentation without the grandiose stage personas of traditional pop stars. First-time director Eric Green scores a coup by getting this notoriously press-shy bunch to open up about the class politics behind the genre’s poor treatment in the British press, MBV’s infamous falling-out with Creation Records, and how that band became sonic innovators whose music is only now truly receiving its due respect” (Seattle International Film Festival.) Almost a decade in the making, Beautiful Noise features interviews with members of Cocteau Twins, The Jesus and Mary Chain, My Bloody Valentine Ride, Slowdive, Chapterhouse, Lush, Curve, Swervedriver, Medicine, Pale Saints, Seefeel, AR Kane, Telescopes, Catherine Wheel and Flying Saucer Attack.

Watch the trailer for “Beautiful Noise”!
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Sexperiments: A Collection of Turned-On Shorts (feat. "Christmas On Earth" w/ live score by White Rainbow!

sexperiments_website
7/25 - 8PM
$12/free for members

As constraints on representing sexuality were loosened for mainstream films starting in the late ‘60s (a la Midnight Cowboy, A Clockwork Orange), so were the shackles around experimental artists, who were finally freed to fearlessly explore and blow minds with alternate views on the love act (or “amourous congress”, as they used to say in olden times.) The filmmakers selected for tonight’s shorts compilation — including luminaries like Gunvor Nelson, Constance Beeson, Paul Sherits, and animators like Vince Collins — employed a myriad of styles, from strobic overstimulation (Peace Mandala) and haunting meditations on the human form (The Operation), to freaked-out comics of morphing genetalia (Desire Pie). Tonight’s centerpiece film even comes complete with a live score! Filmmaker Barbara Rubin was a 20-year-old denzien of Warhol’s Factory, and along with being credited as discovering the Velvet Underground, she also made Christmas On Earth, in which participants in the experiment donned tribal body paint as they proceeded to explore each other every which way but loose. The film’s “screenings” were often at friends’ apartments, with musical accompaniment ranging from turning the radio dial to the Velvets playing live. We’re pleased to announce Portland, OR’s prolific White Rainbow will be supplying tonight’s accompanying soundscape to this carnal free-for-all of fingerpainting and fingerbanging.

Watch Cinefamily’s original NSFW trailer for “Sexperiments!”

Cannibal (director Manuel Martín Cuenca in person!)

cannibal_website
7/26 - 5PM
$12/free for members

Director Manuel Martín Cuenca in person! “Cannibalism pops up with fair regularity now; between the original and remake of We Are What We Are and the TV series Hannibal, it seems a particular kind of obsession/evil that we find interesting. At what point would you eat a human being? Only for survival? Rather than take a melodramatic, religious, or psycho-killer approach, Cannibal is a minimalist thriller, a story of love and pain, stripped of veneer and yet controlled and refined, with a incredible central performance by Antonio de la Torre. Carlos, a men’s tailor who lives a relatively isolated life in Granada, is also a cannibal, killing young, foreign women with few ties who cross his path, preparing their meat and eating, mainly alone, in his small flat. After he eats his neighbour, her sister inquires after her whereabouts. Despite himself, Carlos begins to help Nina, and a strange romance begins. The reasons behind Carlos’ gastronomic interest are never really explored; but then, do they need to be? Cannibal gives us a meditative examination of the strangeness of this particular human heart, without resorting to cheap violence, but instead presenting a meditative study in precision, pain, loneliness and redemption.” (Twitch Film)
Dir. Manuel Martín Cuenca, 2013, DCP, 116 min.

Watch the trailer for “Cannibal”!
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Artcore: The Films Of Stephen Sayadian, Night #1 ("Cafe Flesh", Stephen Sayadian & Jerry Stahl in person!)

cafeflesh_website
7/26 - 8PM
$12/free for members

“Stephen Sayadian is a born provocateur. A gregarious storyteller. A genre unto himself. The genre he created, dominated and left behind could best be described as surrealist nightmare art-porn. But funny. With his twin early-’80s epics Nightdreams and Café Flesh created under the pseudonym “Rinse Dream”, Sayadian lifted from experimental theatre (where he has also worked extensively), silent cinema and absurdist comedy to create X-rated films that are hallucinations that stick with you.” (Twitch Film) We’re very proud to welcome Stephen in-person for a boffo night of conversation spanning his entire career, from his earliest days as a creative director in the Hustler Magazine empire, to artist behind some of the most iconic ‘80s movie poster art (Dressed To Kill, Body Double), to visionary maker of the most unusual adult cinema ever lensed in 35mm. Then, it’s time for Café Flesh, Sayadian’s slice of nightmarish, New Wave sci-fi avant-gardism set in a post-apocalyptic, post-sex society — one where the last remaining erotic creatures are made to display their prowess in a seedy, insane cabaret that mixes early music video aesthetics, Dada and dong-age to stunning effect. Tonight’s other special guest is Jerry Stahl (“Permanent Midnight”), the film’s co-writer!
Dir. Stephen Sayadian (aka Rinse Dream), 1982, 35mm, 80 min. (Print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive)

Watch an excerpt from “Cafe Flesh”!
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Watch Cinefamily’s original NSFW trailer for “Sexperiments!”

HEAVY MIDNITES: My Own Private Idaho (presented by Xiu Xiu)

myownprivateidaho_website
7/26 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Xiu Xiu are a longtime favorite band around here, a unique blend of post-punk heartache and experimental ideals — so we’re excited that frontman Jamie Stewart is stopping by in the midst of a national tour, to present a film that’s deeply influenced his life and music. Gus Van Sant’s poetic 1991 road movie is truly affecting, traveling a sad, lonely and visually stunning path that beautifully evokes a state of drifting need and passionate longing. River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves star as young hustlers: Mike, a sensitive narcoleptic dreaming of the mother that abandoned him, and Scott, the wayward son of a rich family and the object of Mike’s desire. Navigating a volatile world of junkies, thieves and johns, they take a dreamy quest from the grungy streets to the open highways in search of home. But, don’t fear, it’s not a total downer; Udo Kier even sings and dances with a lamp. A pioneering American work filled with stylized flair, surreal imagery, Shakespeare references and two seriously sexy leads exploring their abilities, My Own Private Idaho helped take New Queer Cinema mainstream, cemented Phoenix’s legacy and still leaves an impact on everyone that watches it.
Dir. Gus Van Sant, 1991, 35mm, 104 min.

Watch the trailer for “My Own Private Idaho”!
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We Are The Best (7/27)

wearethebest_website
7/27 - 5PM
$12/free for members

We Are The Best has gotten pretty much everyone in our entire office excited. It’s a great film for a list of reasons, but the two main ones are: 1) in an international cinematic landscape filled with coming-of-age classics about nothing but boys (The 400 Blows, Pather Panchali, etc.), this is one of the best female-driven coming-of-age stories we’ve ever seen; 2) out of the many, many films about punk rock to hit the screen over the decades (and trust us, we’ve seen many), this is one of the very best. Filmmaker Lukas Moodysson has crafted what might be the best look into middle school-dom in recent memory, perfectly capturing how 13-year-old outcast girls would react to indifferent parents, sleepy snow-covered towns offering little to do, alcohol, parties, forming a band with no previous experience, and how to deal with each other when boys get thrown into the mix. Best of all, We Are The Best never panders to either punk or femme stereotypes, instead giving us one of the strongest groups of teenage characters since John Hughes’ heyday.
Dir. Lukas Moodysson, 2013, DCP, 102 min.

Watch the trailer for “We Are The Best”!
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Artcore: The Films Of Stephen Sayadian, Night #2 ("Nightdreams")

nightdreams_website
7/27 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…
Dir. Francis Delia, 1981, 35mm, 78 min.

Watch the trailer for “Nightdreams”!
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Watch Cinefamily’s original NSFW trailer for “Sexperiments!”

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/27)

texaschainsawmassacre1_website
7/27 - 9:50PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
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GREG PROOPS FILM CLUB: Bull Durham

gregproops_bulldurham_website
7/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for the seriously fun ‘80s Kevin Costner sports saga Bull Durham. Greg sez: “The best baseball movie because it’s foremost a sexy movie that includes baseball. The anti-Natural — nobody wins the big game, no slo-mo home run with lights bursting. This is a character study with loads of laffs. Costner, when he was dead sexy before he Danced with Wolves, is a minor league catcher on his last few laps, brought in to nursemaid the new fireballing phenom pitcher (Tim Robbins, before he saved the world). They vie for the attention of the fabulously radiant Susan Sarandon, who’s a font of wisdom: literary, baseball and sexual. She mentors only one player each season. Nuke needs a nanny, Crash needs a break, Annie needs a reason. This movie answers the question, “What are they talking about on the mound?” Perfect summertime fare. Male bonding and dreams that may come true.”
Dir. Ron Shelton, 1988, 35mm, 108 min.

Q: Does Greg talk over the movies, like the Benson Interruption?
A: No. It is a recording of his podcast, followed by a screening of the film.

Watch an excerpt from “Bull Durham”!
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The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/28)

texaschainsawmassacre2_website
7/28 - 10:45PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
YouTube Preview Image

FREE SNEAK PREVIEW: James Franco's "Child of God"

childofgod_website
7/29 - 7:30PM
free admission (first-come, first-served)

“The remarkably prolific James Franco’s recent projects have addressed, in various forms, the idea of the American outsider, from the street hustlers in his My Own Private River installation, through the fetishists of Interior: Leather Bar to performative seances with visual artist Laurel Nakadate. Child of God, adapted from Cormac McCarthy’s novel, extends Franco’s ambitions into considerably more dangerous and disturbing terrain. Lester Ballard (Scott Haze) is an abandoned soul, unable to fit into the social order. As he withdraws into his own mind, he turns to violence and, ultimately, necrophilic relationships, looking for solace in a world that continually rejects him. The town sheriff, both sympathetic to and fearful of the man, slowly closes the net around him — but a mob of townfolk have ideas of their own. Franco hits an impressive new stride as a filmmaker, laying bare his characters against a beautifully textured palette of grey and beige, proposing unusual camera angles to destabilize our expectations. And as the film reaches its surprising climax, his experiments with lighting result in some of the most striking images in cinema this year.” (Noah Cowan, Toronto Int’l Film Festival)
Dir. James Franco, 2013, DCP, 104 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Watch the trailer for “Child of God”!
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The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/29)

texaschainsawmassacre3_website
7/29 - 10PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
YouTube Preview Image

We Are The Best (7/30)

wearethebest_website
7/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

We Are The Best has gotten pretty much everyone in our entire office excited. It’s a great film for a list of reasons, but the two main ones are: 1) in an international cinematic landscape filled with coming-of-age classics about nothing but boys (The 400 Blows, Pather Panchali, etc.), this is one of the best female-driven coming-of-age stories we’ve ever seen; 2) out of the many, many films about punk rock to hit the screen over the decades (and trust us, we’ve seen many), this is one of the very best. Filmmaker Lukas Moodysson has crafted what might be the best look into middle school-dom in recent memory, perfectly capturing how 13-year-old outcast girls would react to indifferent parents, sleepy snow-covered towns offering little to do, alcohol, parties, forming a band with no previous experience, and how to deal with each other when boys get thrown into the mix. Best of all, We Are The Best never panders to either punk or femme stereotypes, instead giving us one of the strongest groups of teenage characters since John Hughes’ heyday.
Dir. Lukas Moodysson, 2013, DCP, 102 min.

Watch the trailer for “We Are The Best”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (40th Anniversary restoration, 7/30)

texaschainsawmassacre1_website
7/30 - 10PM
$12/free for members

One of the ultimate landmarks in modern horror film, Tobe Hooper’s astoundingly executed dose of visceral kineticism is the gritty look at down-home cannibalism in the outskirts of the Lone Star State that became an instant smash upon its release in 1974, and was the first film to genuinely fuse avant-garde experimental filmmaking techniques to the horror genre. Shell-shocked LSD-influenced editing, dislocating setpieces staged in searingly broad daylight and grinding musique concrète on the soundtrack all elevate The Texas Chainsaw Massacre from something merely “scary” to an indelible nightmare that never fails to freak the pants off of any viewer, first-time or otherwise. As well, the brilliant bits of scenic detail make you believe you’ve seen more than you really have, creating an atmosphere of pure hell on earth, as if the actual celluloid has been soaking in the air of a slaughterhouse for far too long. Most importantly, Hooper has more on his mind than to just give you a queasy feeling — he successfully posits that, in addition to mere entertainment, horror movies can also be works of art.
Dir. Tobe Hooper, 1974, DCP, 84 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”!
YouTube Preview Image

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: The Possibilities Are Endless (L.A. premiere!)

possibilities_website
7/31 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Imagine your mind has been wiped: memories, knowledge, experiences, language, every word you ever spoke. If eventually you were able to find words, what would you say? First rising to rock prominence in the early ‘80s post-punk scene with his band Orange Juice, Collins — a celebrated lyricist and frontman — could only speak two phrases after waking up from a severe stroke in 2005, which effectively deleted the contents of his mind: “Grace Maxwell” (his wife’s name), and “The possibilities are endless.” As Edwyn submerges himself in a landscape of memories, trying to unlock the story of his past, The Possibilities Are Endless places us directly inside Edwyn’s mind for a lyrical first-person journey, as he comes back from the brink of death back to language, music, life and love.
Dirs. James Hall & Edward Lovelace, 2014, HD presentation, 83 min.

Watch an excerpt from “The Possibilities Are Endless”!
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Watch Cinefamily’s original teaser for “The Possibilities Are Endless”!

Moebius (8/1)

moebius_01_large.png
8/1 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dirs. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

Watch the trailer for “Moebius”!
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DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: BMI Roundtable 2014

BMI_Logo_Final_BLK_Hi-480x309
8/2 - 1PM
$7/free for members

Full description coming soon…

Join us for an intimate discussion of the changing landscape for music rights and new media. Musicians can find out how to get their music into films, TV and new media, and filmmakers can learn how to clear the rights for music for their work.

THE SILENT TREATMENT: Hell's Angels

hellsangels_website
8/2 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Perhaps Hollywood’s greatest-ever eccentric, Howard Hughes brought a strange, showman-like air to every creative project he touched — and no film, not even his productions of Scarface, The Outlaw and The Front Page, matched the ambition of this 1930 masterpiece. Originally filmed as a silent, Hell’s Angels was converted by producer/semi-director Hughes (several others contributed to the directing, including a fresh-faced James Whale) into one of moviedom’s first talkies, complete with a thick layer of juicy Pre-Code slang. Stanley Kubrick once declared that this was one of the films that most influenced his own style, and, once you catch one look at its meticulously designed, WWI-era aerial dogfight recreations, it’s easy to see why. Hubba-hubba co-star Jean Harlow alone is reason enough for a Hell’s Angels viewing, but Hughes is pretty much the real star on display, as the film’s displays of deadly daring-do remain to this day some of the most stirring and dramatic ever filmed. Come revel in this sparkling 35mm restoration from the UCLA Film & Television archive, complete with hand-tinting and the legendary Technicolor sequence!
Dir. Howard Hughes, 1930, 35mm, 131 min. (Print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive)

Moebius (8/2)

moebius2_480_309
8/2 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dirs. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

Watch the trailer for “Moebius”!
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FREE SNEAK PREVIEW: The Trip To Italy

triptoitaly_website
8/3 - 7:30PM
free admission (first-come, first-served)

“The dynamic duo of Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon return for another highly entertaining round of travel and food porn in The Trip to Italy, a most welcome sequel to 2010’s The Trip that follows our intrepid armchair gastronomes on a carb-heavy tour of Italy, from northern Piemonte to the sun-drenched Amalfi Coast. Resolving not to fix what wasn’t broken, director Michael Winterbottom once again gives free reign to his stars’ improvisational gifts, juxtaposed with heaping plates, reflections on art and literature, and incessant celebrity vocal impressions. A hangout movie in the purest sense, the first Trip threw Coogan and Brydon — cast as slightly exaggerated, odd-couple versions of themselves — together in an SUV and sent them on a culinary odyssey through the north of England. This Trip more or less sticks to the same template; much of the pleasure comes from Coogan and Brydon interacting with their surroundings, using ancient history as rich comic fodder. But even when it’s just ambling about, The Trip To Italy casts a warm, enveloping spell, letting us ride along with two very funny men as they indulge in haute cuisine, serenely beautiful landscapes, and the pleasure of each other’s company.” — Scott Foundas, Variety
Dir. Michael Winterbottom, 2014, DCP, 108 min.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Watch the trailer for “The Trip To Italy”!
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Moebius (8/3)

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8/3 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dirs. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

Watch the trailer for “Moebius”!
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Moebius (8/4)

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8/4 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Through his meticulously crafted, boundary-pushing body of work and a tireless drive to innovate within his own hermetic universe, Kim Ki-Duk’s risen to become one of the world cinema’s great agent provocateurs in the lofty company of Lars Von Trier, Sion Sono and Gaspar Noe. Moebius might just be his most furthest-reaching effort to date: with nary a single line of dialogue or hardly any refrains of music, its seismic Greek tragedy is conveyed through mad spectacle, dark sexuality, the blackest of humor and an unending fountain of unpredictability. A cheating father — the passive son — the enraged, literally castrating mother and the local convenience store owner (the same actress, in totally night-and-day performances) all collide in a crazed love quadrangle that rivals Takashi Miike’s infamous Visitor Q for sheer force. Moebius will divide audiences fer shure, but sometimes we like that best, for you’re guaranteed to have a strong, engaging opinion. This “controversial auteur has achieved something that is nothing short of remarkable: a balance between the themes he wishes to underscore, his extreme tendencies, his own dark side and the mechanics of effective storytelling.” (Twitch Film)
Dirs. Kim Ki-Duk, 2013, DCP, 89 min.

OFFSITE @ ACE HOTEL: Pulp - A Film About Life, Death & Supermarkets (Jarvis Cocker & filmmaker in person!)

pulp_website
8/5 - 9PM
All tickets $20

Co-presented by CINESPIA, FYF, DON’T KNOCK THE ROCK and ACE HOTEL.

LOCATION: The UA Theater at The Ace, 929 S. Broadway, 90015. Doors 8:00pm, show 9:00pm.

“Moving, funny, sweet, eccentric — and the reaction from the audience, well, it’s the kind of thing that makes you feel like you are smiling with your heart. Two people who I spoke with were moved to tears. How many rock docs can you say that about?” — Richard Metzger, Dangerous Minds

Jarvis Cocker and filmmaker in person! Pulp, best known stateside for their deliriously infectious anthem “Common People”, are one of the quintessential Britpop bands, so distinctly carrying their Northern UK heritage on their sleeve that to know them is to become an honorary citizen of Sheffield, their hometown. Taking that to heart, co-director Florian Habicht teams up with highly charismatic Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker to produce both a concert film chronicling the band’s 2012 farewell Sheffield show, and a “family album” of Sheffield regulars: the Common People. Habicht gets these vox populists to wax fondly about what the town means to them, and how Pulp has woven itself into the very fabric of the town’s lasting culture. “Cocker’s knack for keeping it real, for drawing from regular experience and feeding back into it, is the film’s effortlessly realised QED. If you ever had your head invaded for days on end by Pulp’s ‘Common People’, prepare to have it reoccupied, this time with a portrait gallery for company. If you haven’t, there could hardly be a more irresistible invitation to join the party.” (New Zealand Int’l Film Festival)
Dir. Florian Habicht, 2014, digital presentation, 90 min.

Watch an excerpt from “Pulp: A Film About Life, Death and Supermarkets”!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Boyce & Hart - The Guys Who Wrote 'Em (Bobby Hart & more in person!)

boyceandhart3_website
8/7 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Just as the Sixties turned from black-and-white to Technicolor, they went from starving in New York City to stardom in Hollywood. Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart were best known for writing some of the Monkees’ most popular hits, but that’s really only the beginning. They were actors, activists, singers, songwriters and pop culture icons who helped lead a movement to lower the national voting age to eighteen. However, at the apex of their success, they were managed by a brilliant con artist who absconded with most of their earnings. Their lasting legacy became a brilliant catalog of songs, but more importantly, an enduring contribution to the American political landscape. They changed lives and they changed law. Following their journey from overnight successes to devastating failure, to being unlikely political crusaders, The Guys Who Wrote ‘Em skips the usual talking heads and lets B&H’s own home movies, photos, and personal archives tell the real story. Schedules permitting, Bobby Hart and Keith Allison in person!
Dir. Rachel Lichtman, 2014, DCP, 82 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Guys Who Wrote ‘Em!

The Dog + Dog Day Afternoon

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8/8 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

THE DOG – 7:30pm
This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character. Our opening night includes a double feature with Dog Day Afternoon!
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

DOG DAY AFTERNOON – approx. 9:30pm
“When I made those films, I wasn’t allowed to make a normal picture. Every picture I made had to have this thing in it. There was a kind of unconscious pressure I felt.” — Al Pacino, speaking in 2004

“After Serpico, Pacino’s second collaboration with [director Sidney] Lumet gave the actor another opportunity to serve as kind of a mouthpiece for the angst of the American male in a period of transition. Dog Day Afternoon may not present [The Dog’s John] Wojtowicz’s reality to the letter, but given the period and the circumstances of its production, it’s a fairly radical work, concerned with “reality” in ways that were both daringly topical at the time of its release and prescient, particularly in regards to its depiction of stardom in an always-on media age. [For Serpico], the actor relied heavily on the time he spent with the inspiration for the character. Not so [here] the second time. Working without referencing the primary source, Pacino built his character the Actors Studio way. Lumet estimated that 60 percent of the dialogue was improvised. While they followed the structure of [Frank] Pierson’s Oscar-winning screenplay, within that structure, improvising the actual spoken language fit with Pacino’s version of the Method, his process of becoming another person by drawing on his own personal thoughts, feelings and experiences.” — Karina Longworth, Al Pacino: Anatomy of an Actor
Dir. Sidney Lumet, 1975, 35mm, 125 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

Watch the trailer for “Dog Day Afternoon”!
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FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS: Motel Hell (Blu-Ray release party, filmmakers in person!)

motelhell_website
8/8 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Co-presented by SCREAM FACTORY

Co-writers/producers Robert & Steven-Charles Jaffe, and co-star Paul Linke in person! Complete with an infamous dueling chainsaw showdown, Cheers regular John Ratzenberger and scratchy-voiced radio legend Wolfman Jack, Motel Hell remains an engaging cult oddity that yearns for new blood. Vincent (western star Rory Calhoun) and his sister run the charming Motel Hello, along with a popular smoked meat product line: “It takes all kinds of critters to make Farmer Vincent’s fritters.” Of course, said critters include people unlucky enough to get planted up to their necks in the motel’s garden — fattening up until they’re prime sausage material. A real surprise at the dawn of the slasher era, Motel Hell first grabbed attention when its disturbing image of a maniac in a bloody pig mask wielding a chainsaw landed on the cover of Fangoria, causing the issue to get pulled from stands. Many assumed it was another Tobe Hooper-esque variation, but it’s really one of the most twisted black-comedy horror films in mainstream American cinema, closest in spirit to fare like Parents and Eating Raoul. Real juicy fun, with a curtain-dropping line of dialogue for the ages.
Dir. Kevin Connor, 1980, 35mm, 102 min.

Watch a vintage TV commercial spot for “Motel Hell”!
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The Dog (8/9)

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8/9 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

HEAVY MIDNITES: Robot Jox (25th Anniversary, Stuart Gordon in person!)

robotjox_website
8/9 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Schedule permitting, director Stuart Gordon in person! Break out the oil cans and oversized wrenches; we’ve got the film that proves once and for all there’s nothing cooler than giant robots beating the crap out of each other. So feast your eyes on the ultimate killing machine: part man, part metal and all awesome. In this brutal post-apocalypse, patriotic heroes must pilot multi-storied, mechanized death-bots to settle disputes as electric gladiators. The most expensive movie ever birthed by Charles Band’s Empire Pictures (the house that gave us Ghoulies, Trancers and other VHS staples), Robot Jox is awash with ambitious stop-motion animation and in-camera effects, impressive miniatures and practical models, a great orchestral score, plus the stylish attitude and directorial flourishes of filmmaker Stuart Gordon (Re-Animator, From Beyond, Stuck). It’s a rollicking piece of futuristic entertainment, scripted by famed genre author Joe Haldeman as a combination of Saturday morning cartoons and serious science fiction. A perfect late night flick filled with Cold War allusions, Greek mythology and even a gigantic robot chainsaw penis!
Dir. Stuart Gordon, 1989, 35mm, 85 min.

Watch the trailer for “Robot Jox”!
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The Dog (8/10)

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8/10 - 8:45PM
$12/free for members

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

The Dog (8/11)

thedog_480_309
8/11 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

Show & Tell w/ Larry Flynt

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8/12 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

Description coming soon…

The Dog (8/12)

thedog1_480_309
8/12 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

The Dog (8/13)

thedog2_480_309
8/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Led Zeppelin Played Here (L.A. premiere!)

ledzeppelinplayedhere_website
8/14 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Starting with the brilliant landmark ‘80s short Heavy Metal Parking Lot, Jeff Krulik has blazed a trail of idiosyncratic documentary works that turn our pop-culture world on its ear, in an ongoing, charming portrait of skewed Americana. We proudly welcome Jeff’s return to Cinefamily with his latest feature doc, examining a strange chapter in Maryland/D.C. rock lore. It’s 1969: Man lands on the moon, half a million strong show up at Woodstock, Sesame Street makes its debut — and a young Led Zeppelin perform in the gym of the Wheaton Youth Center on Georgia Avenue, in front of fifty confused teenagers. Or did they…? Krulik sets out to separate the truth from the rumors, re: the endearing local legend about the night of January 20, 1969, during the first Presidential Inauguration of Richard Nixon. Featuring interviews with rock writers, musicians, and fans, including several who claim they were there witnessing history that night. Plus, a look at one of the most amazing collections of Led Zep memorabilia ever!
Dir. Jeff Krulik, 2013, digital presentation, 90 min.

Watch the trailer for “Led Zeppelin Played Here”!
YouTube Preview Image

The Dog (8/14)

thedog_480_309
8/14 - 10:20PM
$12/free for members

This riotously entertaining new doc highlights one of those master outside-the-box thinkers that make an era like the Seventies still so wonderfully alluring: the vivacious John Wojtowicz, the bank robber who was the inspiration for Pacino’s character in the film classic Dog Day Afternoon. Way more than just a rundown of the real-life heist, this is an intimate portrait of Wojtowicz’s intense psychological makeup: coming of age in the ‘60s, “The Dog” took pride in being a pervert, displaying a bisexual libido excessive even by the libertine standards of the era. Amongst the tumult of the early gay liberation movement, one of his lovers needed to finance their sex-reassignment surgery — and Wojtowicz had what he thought was the quick solution. Filmed over the course of a decade, Wojtowicz lets loose with a torrent of incredible, quotable quips (pretty much everything he’s ever said on-camera is pure gold), amongst extraordinary archival footage and interviews capturing the many sides of this larger-than-life persona: lover, husband, soldier, activist, mama’s boy and uniquely American character.
Dirs. Allison Berg & François Keraudren, 2013, DCP, 100 min.

Watch the trailer for “The Dog”!

An Evening With Joan Micklin Silver (feat. "Chilly Scenes of Winter")

eveningwithjoanmicklinsilver_website
8/17 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Description coming soon…
Chilly Scenes of Winter Dir. Joan Micklin Silver, 1979, 35mm, 92 min.

TV TUESDAYS: A Tribute To "Inside Out"

8/19 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Description coming soon…

FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS: 28 Days Later

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8/22 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Time flies when you’re having fun; can you believe it’s been over a decade since Danny Boyle’s 28 Days Later hit the horrorsphere like a rage virus, and changed the zombie genre forever? Its core concept — that a man wakes up in a hospital to find the world decimated by plague — has been imitated ad nauseum, and the deployment of “fast zombies” (though technically not “zombies” in the film’s context) has become standard operating procedure for apocalyptic horror in the indelible wake of the film’s 2002 release. Shot on consumer-grade digital video, Boyle’s masterpiece has an urgency that the found footage genre wishes it could capture, while never sacrificing anything in regard to special effects, production value, or sheer blood-soaked beauty. Add to that career-defining performances by Cillian Murphy, Brendan Gleeson and Naomie Harris, and you have an experience that earns every critical accolade that defines a modern classic. We feel it’s high time to get our rage on, and revisit this milestone on the big screen, so come gnaw on your neighbor’s leg and join us!
Dir. Danny Boyle, 2002, 35mm, 113 min.

Watch Cinefamily’s original trailer for “28 Days Later”!

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