Get Rollin' (with director J. Terrance Mitchell in person!)

get rollin
8/16 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

Co-presented by Cinespia

This joyous and fascinating tribute to the glory days of roller disco in Brooklyn’s black community was nearly lost for almost 40 years, but is now ripe for rediscovery. Independently made by a young black director (J. Terrance Mitchell), Get Rollin made the NY Times Top 10 list, but after a botched release, it missed the disco craze, and sank into obscurity. Looking at it now, Get Rollin is more vibrant than ever: an eclectic potpourri of neon-drenched documentary snapshots that capture the scene around the famed Empire Rollerdome, and a fantastic portrait of vintage New York – including street crap games, Bed-Stuy pool halls, and a custom van show. All this is staged around a kitchen-sink storyline starring “Pat the Cat,” a self-made roller disco cowboy, and a caseworker named Vinzerelli, who wants to be the Muhammad Ali of roller boogie – and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records as the first roller skater to make a million dollars. “But then,” he tells the camera from inside his shag-carpet-ensconced, airbrush-laden hippie van, from the other side of rose-lensed aviators, “I realized, ‘but I can’t skate.’” It’s all outrageously fun, and filled with a spirit as optimistic as this magical time and place where it was cool and sexy to do synchronized dance moves and wear sunglasses indoors.

Dir. J. Terrance Mitchell, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

ABD presents: Fritz the Cat + Down and Dirty Duck

fritz-the-cat-movie-poster
8/17 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Presented by Animation Breakdown. Down & Dirty Duck director Charles Swenson in person!

The 70s spree of subversion left no stone unturned, and when it came for animation it set its sights on the adored animal idols of yesteryear. Dig if you will a picture of the US Air Force raining napalm on a ghetto riot as the silhouettes of Mickey and Donald cheer them on. The scene belongs to Fritz the Cat, animation auteur Ralph Bakshi’s revolutionary 1972 debut, and sums up the deviant detours toons would take in years to come. Loosely based on R. Crumb’s beloved drugged up, sex obsessed, miscreant meower but heavily baring Bakshi’s own brand, the film follows the crude and callous kitty as he cruises for lays, runs afoul of the fuzz, dabbles with radical politics, and gets mixed up with a fascist biker gang – tokin’ and jokin’ all along the way. Its X-rating, animation’s first, increased its legend but obscured its nature. Abundantly raunchy but far from porn, Bakshi succeeded in creating the urban “documentary of the 60s” he set out to, savagely satirizing race relations, free love, and politics by way of equal opportunity offending. 45 years later and more transgressive than ever, the gruff n’ heady cult classic has lost none of its barbarous bite.

Soon after Fritz grossed a surprising $90 million worldwide, young animator Charles Swenson (later co-director of Twice Upon A Time) approached Roger Corman with an idea for his own filthy fauna freakout. Corman gave the thumbs up and just $110,000 to create the hand drawn feature that would become Down & Dirty Duck, surely the 70s scruffiest, strangest and greatest animated oddity and one that feels like it ONLY ever screened after midnight. Fresh from animating the stand-out Dental Hygiene Dilemma segment for Zappa’s 200 Motels, Swenson recruited the Mothers of Invention’s Flo & Eddie (né Howard Kaylan and Mark Volman of The Turtles) to lend their voices, songs and warped brains to the mostly improvised film. What resulted was a stream of consciousness, offend-everyone-possible tale about a morose insurance co. flunky, the ribald humanoid duck he unwittingly inherits, and their surreal and smutty misadventures. All this combined with Swenson’s strikingly psychedelic style (shaggy doodles+cutouts+collage) puts Duck even further in the comix-esque vein than Fritz. Come discover what LA Times critic Charles Solomon once called “a sprawling undisciplined piece of sniggering vulgarity that resembles nothing so much as animated bathroom graffiti” – music to the ears of the midnight movie mindset!

Fritz the Cat, dir. Ralph Bakshi, 1972, 35mm, 78 min.
Down and Dirty Duck, dir. Charles Swenson, 1974, 35mm, 75 min

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean

PlasticD-1966-2
8/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Presented by Don’t Knock the Rock and Women of Cinefamily!

Introduced by KJ Relth, Programming Assistant at the UCLA Film and Television Archive, and Maya Montañez Smukler, film historian and author of “Liberating Hollywood: Thirty Years of Women Directors.”

This rare 60s gem was famously impossible to see for decades – unavailable on VHS, DVD, bootleg DVD, torrent, or punk rock 16mm collectors print. Scour the internet, and all you’ll find is a weird ad for it on a double bill of THE HARDER THEY COME, and an obscure reference by Stephen Colbert on The Colbert Report.

“Written, directed, and self-financed by Juleen Compton, The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean is the story of a clairvoyant teenage girl, Norma Jean (Sharon Henesy), taken advantage of by a boy band, fashioned after The Beatles, determined to exploit the young woman’s powers as part of a hoax revival. Filmed in the Ozarks with a cast of young, unknown actors (a 25-year-old Sam Waterston co-stars in his first film appearance), the picture’s opening title sequence — the two young leads walking through a bucolic setting with Michel Legrand’s sentimental score — suggests a tender tale about a pair of young companions. However, the movie quickly takes an unusual turn when Norma Jean and her friend Vance (Robert Gentry) pick up an enormous plastic dome they’ve ordered. Stylistically accomplished, the movie is an impressive example of American independent feature filmmaking during the mid-1960s and an uncommon portrayal, for the time, of female agency. During the 1970s, Compton moved to Los Angeles in hopes of directing features in Hollywood. Frustrated with Hollywood’s sexist hiring practices, she returned to New York City during the 1990s to run a successful off-Broadway theater company.” –Maya Montañez Smukler

Dir. Juleen Compton, 1966, 35mm, 82 min.

35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive.

Get Rollin'

get rollin 2
8/18 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinespia

This joyous and fascinating tribute to the glory days of roller disco in Brooklyn’s black community was nearly lost for almost 40 years, but is now ripe for rediscovery. Independently made by a young black director (J. Terrance Mitchell), Get Rollin made the NY Times Top 10 list, but after a botched release, it missed the disco craze, and sank into obscurity. Looking at it now, Get Rollin is more vibrant than ever: an eclectic potpourri of neon-drenched documentary snapshots that capture the scene around the famed Empire Rollerdome, and a fantastic portrait of vintage New York – including street crap games, Bed-Stuy pool halls, and a custom van show. All this is staged around a kitchen-sink storyline starring “Pat the Cat,” a self-made roller disco cowboy, and a caseworker named Vinzerelli, who wants to be the Muhammad Ali of roller boogie – and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records as the first roller skater to make a million dollars. “But then,” he tells the camera from inside his shag-carpet-ensconced, airbrush-laden hippie van, from the other side of rose-lensed aviators, “I realized, ‘but I can’t skate.’” It’s all outrageously fun, and filled with a spirit as optimistic as this magical time and place where it was cool and sexy to do synchronized dance moves and wear sunglasses indoors.

Dir. J. Terrance Mitchell, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Friday Night Frights: Bloodsucking Freaks

BloodsuckingFreaks
8/18 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Even in the depraved pantheon of midnight movies, few earn the sort of notoriety of Joel M. Reed’s 1976 splatterpiece Bloodsucking Freaks. Borrowing a page from Herschell Gordon Lewis, particularly his Wizard of Gore, Reed’s film concerns the Grand Guignol theater of Master Sardu (Seamus O’Brien, tragically and poetically stabbed to death a few years later), a sadomasochist master of ceremonies who, along with his little person helper (Luis De Jesus), stages scenes of torture and death to audiences under the pretense of it being faked theater. Blood flows and sexually-charged torture vignettes are performed with a clear sense of tongue-in-cheek camp, O’Brien vamping like Anton Lavey reimagined as a villain from the 60s Batman TV show. Tasteless in the best possible 70s Times Square seedy sort of way, the film clearly prefigures the torture porn craze of the aughts but does so with much needed irony and sleazy pizazz.

Dir. Joel M. Reed, 1976,

Watch the trailer!

Visa de censure n° X + Vite

unnamed
8/19 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Visa de censure n° X

Best known for his roles in Belle de jour, Sweet Movie, and many more, Pierre Clementi was also the architect behind a transgressive, high-minded, and disorienting cinema. Like an acid-soaked freefall, Visa de censure n° X is a rush of nudity and color from one of France’s most seductively watchable actors, set to an album’s worth of psychedelic prog rock (performed by the Delired Cameleon Family, a group featuring members of French band Clearlight).

Dir. Pierre Clementi, 1968, digital presentation, 44 min.

Vite

In 1969, the painter-sculptor Daniel Pommereulle made his third film, this one financed by Sylvina Boissonnas. Although only a short, Vite was one of the most costly of all the Zanzibar productions. It features, for instance, shots of the moon taken by a state-of-the-art telescope, the Questar, that Pommereulle first saw while visiting Marlon Brando in southern California in 1968. In Rohmer’s La collectionneuse, Pommereulle and his friend Adrien philosophize on how best to achieve le vide (emptiness) during their summer holidays. Three years later, Pommereulle would transform the word “vide” to “vite” (quickly), signifying his profound disenchantment with the aftermath of the revolution of May ’68. —Sally Shafto

Dir. Daniel Pommereulle, 1969, digital presentation, 37 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Get Rollin'

get rollin 3
8/19 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinespia

This joyous and fascinating tribute to the glory days of roller disco in Brooklyn’s black community was nearly lost for almost 40 years, but is now ripe for rediscovery. Independently made by a young black director (J. Terrance Mitchell), Get Rollin made the NY Times Top 10 list, but after a botched release, it missed the disco craze, and sank into obscurity. Looking at it now, Get Rollin is more vibrant than ever: an eclectic potpourri of neon-drenched documentary snapshots that capture the scene around the famed Empire Rollerdome, and a fantastic portrait of vintage New York – including street crap games, Bed-Stuy pool halls, and a custom van show. All this is staged around a kitchen-sink storyline starring “Pat the Cat,” a self-made roller disco cowboy, and a caseworker named Vinzerelli, who wants to be the Muhammad Ali of roller boogie – and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records as the first roller skater to make a million dollars. “But then,” he tells the camera from inside his shag-carpet-ensconced, airbrush-laden hippie van, from the other side of rose-lensed aviators, “I realized, ‘but I can’t skate.’” It’s all outrageously fun, and filled with a spirit as optimistic as this magical time and place where it was cool and sexy to do synchronized dance moves and wear sunglasses indoors.

Dir. J. Terrance Mitchell, 1980, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Liquid Sky (Off-site at the Vista w/ special guests in person!)

LiquidSky
8/19 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

This event will take place at the Vista, located at 4473 Sunset Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

With cinematographer Yuri Neyman, and production/costume designer Marina Levikova in person

One of the coolest, funniest, and freakiest distillations of the ‘80s post-punk underground, Liquid Sky is pure madness: blending drugs, UFOs, death by orgasm and a cacophony of searing synths into a jagged neon time capsule that still thrills. In a dual role, Anne Carlisle plays Margaret (a damaged lesbian fashion model) and Jimmy (a gay junkie fashion model), who collide in NYC’s robotic New Wave netherworld. When aliens happen to land on Margaret’s roof in a pint-sized flying saucer (on a mission to extract the life force from the human orgone), they vaporize her many lovers in a dogpile of kaleidoscopic nuttiness. Russian emigré director Slava Tsukerman, himself out of place in the alien world of the ‘80s Lower East Side arthole, has big fun piling on the primitive video abstractions, fractured music, and overwrought melodrama in order to deliver a skewering satire of a weird, weird world.

Dir. Slava Tsukerman, 1983, 35mm, 112 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Tokyo Drifter

tokyo drifter
8/20 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the Japan Foundation

Genre-smasher, jazz gangster, captain of cool: with Tokyo Drifter, maverick filmmaker Seijun Suzuki hit an avant-garde high that left an indelible mark on movie history. Tetsuya Watari – a then-massively famous Japanese pop star – is a wandering Yakuza on the run from ruthless, warring gangsters. Sounds like a million crime pictures you’ve seen before, but this is Suzuki at the pinnacle of his radical, individualist, genre reinvention. We are quickly whisked away into a non-linear, surrealist, absurdist landscape; together with Branded to Kill – which led to his termination from Nikkatsu studios – Suzuki crafted a pair of extravagant gangster film fever-dreams. A master of the widescreen (scope) frame, Suzuki uses every trick in the book this side of Godard or Bava – opening in lush black & white before exploding with vibrant neons, epic Spaghetti Western-esque close-ups and saloons, Vincente Minnelli musical numbers – in this veritable feast of stylized pop-art that influenced, among others, Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Dir. Seijun Suzuki, 1966, 35mm, 83 min.

Tokyo Drifter

tokyo drifter2
8/21 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the Japan Foundation

Genre-smasher, jazz gangster, captain of cool: with Tokyo Drifter, maverick filmmaker Seijun Suzuki hit an avant-garde high that left an indelible mark on movie history. Tetsuya Watari – a then-massively famous Japanese pop star – is a wandering Yakuza on the run from ruthless, warring gangsters. Sounds like a million crime pictures you’ve seen before, but this is Suzuki at the pinnacle of his radical, individualist, genre reinvention. We are quickly whisked away into a non-linear, surrealist, absurdist landscape; together with Branded to Kill – which led to his termination from Nikkatsu studios – Suzuki crafted a pair of extravagant gangster film fever-dreams. A master of the widescreen (scope) frame, Suzuki uses every trick in the book this side of Godard or Bava – opening in lush black & white before exploding with vibrant neons, epic Spaghetti Western-esque close-ups and saloons, Vincente Minnelli musical numbers – in this veritable feast of stylized pop-art that influenced, among others, Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Dir. Seijun Suzuki, 1966, 35mm, 83 min.

Dolores (Free sneak peek w/ Dolores Huerta and director Peter Bratt in person!)

#1 - United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta organizing marchers on the 2nd day of March Coachella in Coachella, CA 1969. © 1976 George Ballis - Take Stock - The Image Works
8/22 - 7:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

Followed by a Q&A with Dolores Huerta & Peter Bratt! Post reception on the patio with a DJ set by Sesamie (KXLU)!

History tells us Cesar Chavez transformed the U.S. labor movement by leading the first farm workers union. But missing from this story is his equally influential co-founder, Dolores Huerta, who tirelessly led the fight for racial and labor justice alongside Chavez, becoming one of the most defiant feminists of the twentieth century. Like so many powerful female advocates, Dolores and her sweeping reforms were and still are largely overlooked. She remains as steadfast in her fight as ever at the age of 87. Peter Bratt’s provocative and energizing documentary challenges this incomplete, one-sided history and reveals the raw, personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to the fight for justice. Interweaving archival footage with interviews from Dolores and her contemporaries (including Angela Davis, Gloria Steinem, and many more), the film sets the record straight on one of the most effective and undervalued civil and labor rights leaders in modern U.S. history.

Dir. Peter Bratt, 2017, DCP, 95 min.

Opens exclusively at the Landmark Nuart on September 8. Special appearances opening weekend.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

The Harder They Come

TheHarderTheyCome
8/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Co-presented by Hydro Studios

The epochal cultural moment that gave America its first true taste of Jamaica — and the film that made Jimmy Cliff an international superstar! Four decades on, The Harder They Come is still electric with the feeling of cinematic discovery right from its opening moments. This rare blend of crime drama and musical forms a kind of island Scarface, as Cliff’s country-boy-in-search-of-fame worms his way through Kingston in the successive guises of laborer, recording artist, convict, ganja dealer, and finally, outlaw folk hero on the lam. Amongst its perfectly balanced mix of police shootouts, love story tenderness, lush scenery, music biz vérité, and dirt-under-the-fingernails street-level reality, the film also comes fully-equipped with one of the most fantastic soundtracks in movie history — one that finds Cliff at the peak of his creative powers. Before The Harder They Come, our collective American perception of a “foreign film” was narrowly limited to the Bergmans and the Kurosawas of the cinematic sphere; this game-changer blew the doors off of that notion, and still hasn’t lost a single drop of its cool, its edge, and its ability to make you dance.

Dir. Perry Henzell, 1972, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Private Rental

8/24 - 6PM

For this timeslot, we will not be open to the public, as some lucky patron has rented our theater — both supporting the Cinefamily and using the beautiful Silent Movie Theatre for their own event. The theater can be yours, too! Weddings, premieres of your film with an on-site afterparty, business-related entertaining, great birthdays, bar or bat mitzvahs, or any other kind of celebration you can imagine — it’s better at the movies. For more information, email “events@cinefamily.org”

The Lovers

lesamants
8/25 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by the French Film and TV Office

With a DJ set by Ramakawa

In memory of Jeanne Moreau

Abandoning the gritty Parisian streets of Elevator to the Gallows, Moreau and Malle followed up that burst of jazz-crime for a seductive, novelistic meditation on bourgeois malaise a la campagne. Moreau’s Jeanne Tournier is a bored housewife living luxuriously in a Dijon mansion – her wandering eyes and affections drifting from her newspaper-tycoon husband to the polo-playing urbanite Raoul. The arrival of a third wheel, Bernard, results in two of Malle’s dreamiest, delectably Hitchcockian sequences – all photographed in lush black and white by New Wave legend Henri Decaë (The Red Circle, The Samourai, 400 Blows, etc). Although Moreau had already made nearly 20 films, her enrapturing performance in The Lovers springboarded her career into international stardom.

Dir. Louis Malle, 1958, 35mm, 89 min.

Jerry Beck's Midnight Madness

cobwebhotel
8/25 - 10PM
$12/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Animated shorts of all sorts were regularly part of midnight shows in the 1970s and 1980s. Between double features, preceding cult movies, and in between rock shows, cartoons were featured to keep the captive crowd on a contact high. Frequently, a whole program of campy, crazy, vintage ‘toons would hold forth from midnight till 3am. Cinefamily’s resident animation guru, Jerry Beck, actually curated several midnight cult cartoon fests at New York’s 8th Street Playhouse and Thalia repertory theaters back in the day. He’s consented to collect his favorite selection of groovy ‘toons, some from the golden age, others created by the earliest independent animators of the 60s and 70s, and he will give us some insights as to animation’s role in the history of Midnight movies. The Sunshine Makers, Bambi Meets Godzilla, and The Cobweb Hotel are among the films in this rare set. You don’t need to bring your legally prescribed medical marijuana… these cartoons will get you high on their own…

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Viva la Muerte

VivaLaMuerte
8/25 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

For fans of Jodorowsky’s transgressive surrealism and taboo-defying imagery, experimental Spanish playwright Fernando Arrabal’s work will be an exciting discovery. The two of them, along with artist Roland Topor (who created Fantastic Planet, as well as the credit sequence to this film) founded the Panique art movement — because they thought the Surrealist movement had become too mainstream. Viva la Muerte (“Long Live Death!”), Arrabal’s debut film, is a highly personal tale set during the Spanish Civil War, fueled by bizarre images of violence, sexuality, and biting political commentary.

It is more high-minded and challenging than one expects from typical midnight movie fare — it was probably only programmed by distributors chasing the success of El Topo — and a disturbing, striking tour-de-force considered by many critics to be the pinnacle of Spanish avant-garde filmmaking.

Dir. Fernando Arrabal, 1971, 35mm, 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Detruisez-vous + Acéphale

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8/26 - 6PM
$12/free for members

Detruisez-vous (Destroy Yourselves)

The first of the Zanzibar films, Détruisez-vous was also the debut work of Serge Bard, a student of ethnology at the University of Nanterre who had become disenchanted with the university system and abandoned his studies. Like Godard’s La Chinoise, which featured Anne Wiazemsky (herself a student at Nanterre at the time), the film is set in Nanterre where, just weeks before the student uprising in May 1968, Bard returned to shoot. Prefiguring the mounting militancy, Bard casts Alain Jouffroy as a professor and has him lecture in a nearly empty classroom on the necessity of revolution. —Sally Shafto

Dir. Serge Bard, 1969, digital presentation, 70 min.

Acephale

With its title taken from Georges Bataille’s journal Acéphale (literally, a headless man, but figuratively expressing the need to go beyond rational ways of thinking), Deval’s film is the most literary of the Zanzibar works. The film opens with an illustrative image: a head in the process of being shaved, in close up. This image is accompanied not by the sound of an electric razor but an electric saw, suggesting the need to achieve a tabula rasa by radical means. The story follows the adventures of a young man and his friends as they wander through a barely recognizable post–May 1968 Paris. In documenting the by-gone expressions and gestures of the ’68 generation in France, Acéphale becomes something of an anthropological film that reveals the rites and beliefs of the ideological novitiates. —Sally Shafto

Dir. Patrick Deval, 1968, digital presentation, 65 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Night of the Living Dead (Off-site at the Vista)

NightoftheLivingDead
8/26 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

This event will take place at the Vista, located at 4473 Sunset Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

Join us to celebrate the sadly-departed master with his essential contribution to the midnight movie canon.

Romero’s ‘68 masterpiece, elegant in its simplicity and stark in its depiction of an American populace sleepwalking through the Vietnam era, remains the template for the modern zombie film, even after all these years. Even if you think you know the film inside and out — when’s the last time you actually sat down and watched it? In 35mm? Come give it another whirl with us, and rediscover its brutal beauty.

Dir. George Romero, 1968, 35mm, 96 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Rocky Horror Show & Tell w/ Sal Piro and Larry Viezel

RockyHorror2
8/27 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Co-presented by Sins of the Flesh

No midnight movies retrospective would be complete without addressing the longest running (still playing theatrically after four decades at the Nuart theatre in West LA), cult-iest, most audience-engaging late night flick of all time… The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Rocky is more than just a film, it’s a phenomenon. We’ve invited Sal Piro (founding member of the Rocky Horror Picture Show fan club and member of the first shadow cast ever at the original Waverly Theatre) and super fan and collector Larry Viezel to help us host an evening of rare video clips, photographs, and other ephemera, to recreate and retell the story of how it all happened.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Dinner Game

the dinner game
8/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for The Dinner Game (Le dîner de cons.

Greg sez: The French do so many things well. Pastry, wine, (ah, wine), curating, (See: The Louvre). But one thing they do better than anyone is make fun of their own pretensions. The Dinner Game is a comedy of manners, where the wealthy and sophisticated seek to have their fun by making fools of the hard working boring people but les tables se mettent à l’écoute. The term “con” cannot successfully be translated into English – too much je ne sais quoi. Loosely rendered it falls somewhere between idiot and asshole. The gig is this; a group of rich nabobs throw a dinner party every Wednesday, a dinner of fools where each must bring a “con,” a fool whose plebian tastes and hobbies and opinions they praise and flatter and when they leave they discuss who brought the biggest con with the cynical devotion and meticulousness of the nobel committee. One Wednesday a friend calls Pierre (Thierry Lhermitte) to say he has found the biggest nitwit of all time… and the mayhem begins — morals are exposed and integrity comes to the fore. In this age of the Kremlin Kontrolled Karrot and his utter contempt for fair play, truth, and reality we felt we should show a little classic comedy that exposes cynical venality for what it is: a perk of toxic privilege. Buñeul meets Laurel and Hardy. Dead funny and a brisk 80 minutes. Sois amis pour une bonne nuit d’amusement.

Dir. Francis Veber, 1998, digital presentation, 80 min.

Goon: Last of the the Enforcers (Free sneak peek with Seann William Scott in person)

Goon2_Day15_SM_ 185.jpg
8/30 - 7:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

Sometimes Doug Benson likes to interrupt movies — and then there are times when he just wants to share a favorite with you “as is.” Some of you may remember his love of the under-rated Canadian sports comedy Goon, starring Seann William Scott as sweet dunderhead who lucks into hockey stardom through his brawling prowess. The film fits in nicely between underdog classics like Slap Shot, The Longest Yard and The Bad News Bears.

Doug sez: “I’m a big fan of pretty much every movie ever made about hockey or ice skating, don’t ask me why. I love Slap Shot, Miracle, The Cutting Edge, Ice Castles — even Blades of Glory. After finally getting around to watching Goon, I dare say I liked it better than all of those others.” Now, word has gotten around, and we get a treat… a chance for Doug and us to see the new sequel before anyone else! And for Doug to meet Seann William Scott for a Q & A afterwards.

Dir. Jay Baruchel, 2017, DCP, 101 min.

Exclusive Los Angeles Run at The Los Feliz 3 and on demand/digital begins September 1.

Q: Will Doug and/or anybody else be talking during the movie?
A: No. It is instead a straight-ahead screening

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Watch the trailer!

Mystery Meat #3

Mystery-Meat-web-listing-question
8/30 - 10:30PM
Free w/ RSVP

From Cinefamily’s very beginnings, one of our greatest loves has been the joy of discovery — the extreme curio factor — the “what the hell am I watching?!” feeling that envelops us like a cocoon whenever we stumble across celluloid of unknown artistic origins. Running Cinefamily brings a game of limitations, though — in particular, what we’re doing is intended for an “audience.” But what about the films made for no one? The ones we want to show “just because”? And what about the ones we’ve never even seen ourselves, but sound so out-there that we simply must screen them, just to find out – films too difficult to parse from their flaws, too confusing, too challenging, or just too damn strange. It’s all part of the fun.

We don’t promise these films will be “good.” We offer them with no explanations, no justifications, and no apologies. And we won’t even tell you what they are. Welcome to Mystery Meat.

Warning: These screenings are not for civilians.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Le révélateur (w/ live score by Mary Lattimore and Jeff Zeigler)

lereve
8/31 - 7:30PM
$18/free for members

Co-presented by La Collectionneuse

For those who favor the hallucinatory and the abstract, start revving your psychedelic engines for a dose of French master Philippe Garrel’s potent, shimmering physicality. Tragically unknown in the U.S. despite a significant global following, Garrel has charted an unlikely course from avant-garde provocateur to festival favorite in a revelatory four-decade career. Tonight, one of his earliest, most incendiary shorts is live-scored by harpist Mary Lattimore and multi-instrumentalist Jeff Zeigler, whose albums for the Thrill Jockey label (Slant of Light and The Withdrawing Room) weave an elaborate web of picturesque synthscapes. Le révélateur — made during Garrel’s youthful Zanzibar period spent on the Paris ‘68 frontlines and named for the revealing of images by film developer — “is a fractured and elliptical, but instinctive, elemental, and haunting rumination on the process of awakening, maturation, psychological trauma, and transformation of childhood memory” (Strictly Film School)

Dir. Philippe Garrel, 1968, digital presentation, 67 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

200 Motels

200motels
8/31 - 10PM
$14/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

With an introduction by Diva Zappa

Written in bits and pieces in hotels and motels over a five year period of touring (hence the title), this kaleidoscope of ideas both musical and cinematic was a double album, a symphony, a reinvention of the Mothers of Invention, and a very, very, very strange film. The first movie shot on video and subsequently transferred to film, this allowed for all kinds of wild and weird effects to be used, and on top of that, the collage of ideas and collaborators include animation director Charles Swenson (Dirty Duck), graphic production and production design by Cal Schenkel, Ringo Starr (“as” Zappa), Keith Moon playing a nun, legendary groupies Pamela Des Barres, Janet Ferguson and Lucy Offerall, Theodore Bikel, Flo and Eddie and, of course, The Mothers of Invention. This surrealistic musical comedy was, if anything, about how touring makes you crazy — and that craziness spread onto the set, with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra eventually finding they couldn’t handle it (at the end of filming they ripped up their rented tuxedos). Too out there for mainstream critics and filmgoers, it found an audience amongst the late night crowd. Now, the world has caught up to how special 200 Motels is, and it stands as both a midnight movie perennial and a rare cinematic rendering of the Zappa aesthetic.

Dirs. Frank Zappa (characterizations) and Tony Palmer (visuals), 1971, 35mm, 98 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Friday Night Frights: Plan 9 from Outer Space (w/ Larry Karaszewski & Dana Gould)

Plan9
9/1 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

This event will take place at The Silent Movie Theater, located at 611 N. Fairfax Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90036.

Presented by Friday Night Frights

For the uninitiated, Mr. Wood was a filmmaker who pooled all his resources to make movies in the 1950s and 60s; the thing is, the films aren’t very good. In fact, they’re legendarily “bad,” at least by any conventional definition—glued together with the no-budget, eager showmanship that later gave him the unfair title of Worst Director Ever and a fervent cult following from Danzig to Tim Burton. But let’s destroy the “so-bad-it’s-good” term. Ed Wood made lovable movies with strong atmosphere, awkward dialogue, implausible plots, and a static style that is as strange and seductive as it is hilarious. It’s been 50+ years since he made his magnum opus, Plan 9 from Outer Space — with an all-star cast of Tor Johnson, Vampira, Criswell, Bela Lugosi — and we’re here to celebrate with a rare 35mm screening!

Dir. Ed Wood, 1959, 35mm, 79 min.

Watch the trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Puppets

lambchop1
9/2 - 11AM
$10/free for members & kids under 14

Co-presented by the Los Angeles Guild of Puppetry

It’s time for another Saturday Morning Cartoons at Cinefamily! This month we are very excited to be partnering with the Los Angeles Guild of Puppetry to bring you a Saturday positively packed with puppet pandemonium! Though not technically cartoons, puppets (and Muppets) were as essential to our childhood as any animated adventure. We’ll revisit rarities and classic moments from our favorite moments from shows – like Fraggle Rock, Sesame Street, Lamb chop, Alf, the Muppet show and on and on.

Wear your pajamas, bring your favorite puppets, and come hungry (for our all-you-can eat complimentary cereal bar)!

Sieranevada

sieranevada-cristi-puiu-2-1024x554
9/2 - 3PM
$12/free for members

Presented by Acropolis Cinema

Voted the best undistributed film of 2016 by Film Comment magazine

“Puiu is confirming himself as one of the most truly distinctive (and philosophically fascinating) voices of 21st-century filmmaking; in his singularly thoughtful approach to cinematic realism, he is at once rigorous and quietly radical.” –Geoff Andrew, Sight & Sound

Writer-director Puiu’s fifth feature plays tricks with the viewer from its elusive start—an elaborate, extended street scene involving two testy parents and their young daughter—to a finale that brings this remarkably staged masterpiece to an unexpected end. In between is one of the most sustained extended sequences in movie history: A family memorial service/gathering for a doctor patriarch. Inside a Bucharest apartment, a whole macrocosm of Romanian society seems to be on display, with comedy, bitterness, paranoia, love, and barely concealed anger bouncing around the rooms. Cinematographer Barbu Balasoiu’s roaming camera becomes like a member of the family, capable of quirks and upsets and irony. As always, Puiu’s actors are superhuman, yet appear to be hardly acting at all.

Dir. Cristi Puiu, 2016, DCP, 173 min.

Blood Diner (InSanity tour finale w/ Jackie Kong in person!)

blooddiner7
9/16 - 8PM
$14/free for members

First they greet you, then they eat you! Blood Diner is a deliriously bonkers homage to the films of Herschel Gordon Lewis (the script initially began as a sequel to Lewis’ Blood Feast), as completely insane as you might imagine a 1987 homage to Lewis would be. The story follows two brothers, Michael (Rick Burks) and George (Carl Crew), who – at the behest of their deceased serial killer uncle (now just a talking brain in a jar) – must murder women in order to build a new body for an ancient demon goddess named Sheetar. And the parts they don’t use? They feed to the unwitting customers at their vegetarian diner! Directed by pioneering female genre filmmaker Jackie Kong (The Being), the film is wild, outlandish, grotesque, goofy, and above all else – relentlessly fun. With a killer soundtrack to boot! Join us for a full on party to celebrate the Blu ray release of this cult gem, with Jackie Kong in person. Plus a live performance from the film’s composer, Don Preston (keyboardist of Frank Zappa’s legendary band, Mothers of Invention) and an after party on the patio. Who knows, maybe we can all summon Sheetar?

Dir. Jackie Kong, 1987, DCP, 88 min.

Note: Your ticket also gets you entry to a mini block party following the screening, at Cellar 43. DJ Pervula will spin a Blood Diner dance mix, while the Tutman Boys sell real DONUT heads for your eating pleasure!

The Doug Benson Movie Interruption: The Fate of the Furious

fateofthefurious
9/19 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and friends (who in the past have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the couches, mics in hand, and say whatever pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen. This month’s pick is The Fate of the Furious!

Dir. F. Gary Gray, 2017, DCP 136 min.

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