THE FILMS OF KAREL ZEMAN: Inspiration + The Fabulous Baron Munchausen

zeman_480_309
4/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Czech That Film

Inspiration

A sparking, splendorous, 35mm strip of joie de vivre, Inspiration is perhaps Karel Zeman’s most dizzyingly impressive work. With unimaginable precision, Zeman tells a story in a fragile, miniature world, animating hand-blown glass! He’s master of this delicate universe, like a painter, sculptor, and dreamer all at once. You’ve got to see this one to believe it.

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1949, 35mm, 10 min.

The Fabulous Baron Munchausen

The oft-adapted tales of Baron Munchausen provide ideal fodder for Karel Zeman’s unique stylings, in this ceaselessly playful staple of Czech film. A mixture of live action and animation that takes us through romantically rendered space—from moon to earth, ocean to ocean, and through the belly of a whale—The Fabulous Baron Munchausen is a visual feast from beginning to end, evoking the engravings of Gustave Doré and proof Zeman mostly certainly deserves his unofficial title, “the Czech Méliès.”

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1962, 35mm, 83 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show

purplerain3_480_309
4/28 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

An Evening with Anna Karina featuring A Woman is a Woman

anna_480_309
4/29 - 7:30PM
GA - $25 / VIP Seating & Private Pre-Reception - $45

Women of Cinefamily presents an evening with actress, director, screenwriter, and legendary muse of the French New Wave, Anna Karina! Following a conversation with Karina, we will screen one of her celebrated collaborations with Jean-Luc Godard, A Woman Is A Woman.

Godard’s first in color and Cinemascope, A Woman Is A Woman is a bright, playful opera of opposition to the very end, with every moment a potential opportunity to burst into song and dance. In fact, the score is intrinsically linked to the characters’ melodic cadences and their flippant, impulsive actions. Youthfully veiling topics like politics, relationships, and the inherent challenges of love with carefree quips about correct pronunciation and book titles, characters casually break fourth walls, ride bicycles ’round dining room tables, and engage in highly competitive pose-offs. In her feature debut, Godard muse Anna Karina plays free-spirited beauty Angela, an impassioned striptease artist who yearns desperately for a child, tearing her between two men (Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean-Claude Brialy) engaged in lively competition for her affections. Every visual and aural element in this self-referential, smoky dreamscape of conceptual editing and musical direction is lightheartedly collaged into a delectable New Wave melting pot of experimentation, producing one of the ultimate paradigm-shattering takes on the classical romantic comedy.

Dir. Jean-Luc Godard, 1961, 35mm, 85 min.

Tickets – GA – $25 / VIP Seating & Private Pre-Reception – $45

THE FILMS OF KAREL ZEMAN:Inspiration + The Fabulous Baron Munchausen

baron_480_309
4/29 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Czech That Film

Inspiration

A sparking, splendorous, 35mm strip of joie de vivre, Inspiration is perhaps Karel Zeman’s most dizzyingly impressive work. With unimaginable precision, Zeman tells a story in a fragile, miniature world, animating hand-blown glass! He’s master of this delicate universe, like a painter, sculptor, and dreamer all at once. You’ve got to see this one to believe it.

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1949, 35mm, 10 min.

The Fabulous Baron Munchausen

The oft-adapted tales of Baron Munchausen provide ideal fodder for Karel Zeman’s unique stylings, in this ceaselessly playful staple of Czech film. A mixture of live action and animation that takes us through romantically rendered space—from moon to earth, ocean to ocean, and through the belly of a whale—The Fabulous Baron Munchausen is a visual feast from beginning to end, evoking the engravings of Gustave Doré and proof Zeman mostly certainly deserves his unofficial title, “the Czech Méliès.”

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1962, 35mm, 83 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

UNDERGROUND USA: INDIE CINEMA OF THE 80s - Combat Shock (w/ Dir. Buddy Giovinazzo in person!)

combatshock_480_309
4/29 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Presented by Friday Night Frights

If Agent Orange, murder, and dismemberment are considered the worst offenses of the Vietnam war, Buddy “Buddy G” Giovinazzo’s Combat Shock is a depraved, psycho-as-hell disagreement with that very posit, exploring the unseen but fatal mental scars that plagued a generation of young vets long after returning from the jungle. A fantasmojourney of schadenfreude that Videohound described as “relentlessly bleak,” Buddy G so warps the line between fiction and reality that he cast his brother and the movie’s composer, Ricky G, as Frankie—the critically disturbed young vet whose domestic life post-war (wife, baby, fixing the toilet) is its own special torture chamber.

BUT! Lest ye come looking for some run-of-the-mill psychological drama here, Combat Shock is nothing short of a post-traumatic horrorplay, a splatterpunk opera where the notes of our characters’ despair undulate in perpetual sustain, bolstered by a score we’d describe as something along the lines of “demented Atari possessed by a tripping demon.” As Frankie spends his days in a frozen nightmare – wandering the New York streets like a drugged Raskolnikov, arguing with his wife over their mutant-freak baby, awakened in the night screaming – Combat Shock becomes a brilliant shadowbox of canned terror where the walls inch closer and closer together.

Dir. Buddy Giovinazzo, 1984, 16mm Director’s Cut, 96 min. approx.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

THE FILMS OF KAREL ZEMAN: A Journey to the Beginning of Time & Karel Zeman: Adventurer in Film

journeytime_480_309
4/30 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Czech That Film

A Journey to the Beginning of Time

A children’s science fiction adventure in the spirit of a wildlife documentary, and a dream-voyage through the wild epochs of prehistory, A Journey to the Beginning of Time (Cesta do pravěku) broke ground with Karel Zeman’s unorthodox special effects techniques. Seamlessly integrating live actors with stop-motion, 2-D animation, and puppetry in beautiful constructed environments, Zeman crafts set pieces so lavish that realism becomes irrelevant. Ostensibly a children’s educational film – the team included a noted paleontologist and the designs were taken from the paintings of world-famous paleo-artist Zdenek Burian – yet explicitly indebted to the fantastic tales of Jules Verne, and overflowing with majestic, painterly visuals, Zeman’s timeless vision of prehistoric Earth is also an ode to childhood and the childlike innocence of scientific curiosity.

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1955, HD Digital Presentation, 93 min.

Karel Zeman: Adventurer in Film Begins approx. 4PM

Join us on a Journey to Prehistory… the prehistory of special effects! Before CGI, before there were entire teams of post-production technicians, before the endless barrage of high-budget fantasy films, early animator Karel Zeman was creating technically astounding visual masterpieces, using the kind of masking and in-camera editing that is arduous enough for a still photographer; for a filmmaker it was painstaking (and high-stakes!) labor. We are so excited to introduce the Cinefamily audience to Zeman, who is heralded and beloved in the Czech Republic and among hardcore animation fans, and is too little known outside these niches! Untrained as a filmmaker, Zeman taught himself how to animate by studying film prints of Felix the Cat cartoons, and hired artisans and craftsmen, not filmmakers, to aid him in creating immersive fantasy worlds, rife with “analog” special effects, and a contagious playfulness and conviviality. In this charming documentary portrait, Zeman’s former collaborators and fans (filmmakers Terry Gilliam and Tim Burton among them) speak of the mythical life and work of this impossibly innovative director, artist, magician, and perfectionist force.

Dir. Tomás Hodan, 2015, DCP, 80 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

UNDERGROUND USA: INDIE CINEMA OF THE 80S - Last Night at the Alamo (Premiere of New Restoration!)

lastnightalamo_480_309
4/30 - 6:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Production For Use
Come at 5:30 for Texas-style BBQ on the patio with SXSW founder Louis Black!

Eagle Pennell, in just a handful of films – Hell of a Note, The Whole Shootin’ Match and Last Night at the Alamo –- lionized those laconic dreamers improbably balanced between ambition and nostalgia that have become Austin’s civic identity, the kind of epic underachieverdom that Slacker later turned into an anthropological treatise. In Alamo, a shaggy dog buddy comedy about a Houston bar scheduled for demolition come sunrise, Lou Perry and Sonny Carl Davis star as a homegrown Mutt and Jeff — Perry as the lanky Claude, who spends most of his time feeding excuses to his wife into the payphone, and Davis as the sawed-off Cowboy, the local hero who, in an allegory of the real Alamo, defends the bar’s honor against the proprietor of the Mexican restaurant next door in a tequila-drinking contest. Working from a script by Kim Henkel (co-writer of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre), and shot in a gauzy black-and-white by Gus Van Sant’s cinematographer Eric Alan Edwards (My Own Private Idaho), Eagle’s woozy testament to the comically disenfranchised is part stationary western, part self-medicating rodeo, where the heroes ride barstools and pray they can hang on until last call.

Dir. Eagle Pennell, 1983, DCP Restoration, 81 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

SUPER TIGHT: Season 1 Finale

Special Events - April 2016
supertightjohnyoko480x309
4/30 - 10PM
$25/ free for members. Rolling admission. 21+

Imagine a magical party playground where all the strange, funny, and beautiful elements of art, comedy, magic, and music come to mingle…

SUPER TIGHT—a show that gathers the perfect amount of each of these elements into a frosty martini shaker, adds some magic mushrooms, and shakes until sun up—is back at the Cinefamily for a weird and wonderful SEASON 1 FINALE celebration. That’s right, this is the 12th SUPER TIGHT show and the end of the very successful 1st season. Presented by Casey Rup, Kevin Riggin, and Simon Oré—and hosted by Alana Johnston—this show is guaranteed to be the best SUPER TIGHT yet.

This month’s show will feature the incredible LA City Municipal Dance Squad, an appearance by Kyle Mooney, comedy/music icon Reggie Watts, a very special video presentation from Lance Bangs, music & art from legendary cult hero DANIEL JOHNSTON, DJ sets by All Girls, All Vinyl (Nina Tarr & Kristine Barilli), art installations by Kytten Janae, and magic by Siegfried Tieber.

Plus FOOD, BEVERAGES, AND MORE TBA!

THE FILMS OF KAREL ZEMAN: Invention for Destruction AKA The Fabulous World of Jules Verne

inventionfordestruction_480_309
5/1 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by USC & Czech That Film

Jules Verne, novelist and chronicler of undersea fantasies, provides the subject material for what is not only Zeman’s most popular film but the most successful Czech film of all time, famously screened simultaneously in 96 theaters in New York City upon release, and recipient of the Grand Prix at Expo ‘58. Invention for Destruction AKA The Fabulous World of Jules Verne is based upon several of Verne’s works, especially Face au drapeau (Facing the Flag), a suspenseful and nautical adventure, which in Zemans hands also manages to act as a fairy-tale-like parable on the potential dangers of science (read: atomic energy). As usual, Zeman constructed an astoundingly inventive and immersive universe—on a shoestring—situating his actors firmly in Verne’s immense and beautiful world. Using a process dubbed “Mystimation”, a combination of live action, animated drawings and lithographs, the screen pops with stylized line-etched, living illustrations in a way unseen before or since. Visually jaw-dropping, poetic and bubbling with imagination, Invention is an incredible big screen experience—and this beautiful new restoration makes it one not to be missed!

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1958, DCP, 83 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

THE FILMS OF KAREL ZEMAN: The Stolen Airship or Two Years' Vacation

stolenairship_480_309
5/1 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Czech That Film

Hallucinatory, satirical, and unexpectedly peppered with zany spy antics, The Stolen Airship is a brilliant synthesis of Karel Zeman’s career-spanning preoccupations — the scientific Voyages extraordinaires of Jules Verne, the high adventure of Boy’s Own-style children’s fiction, spunky updates of antique art styles, and of course eclectic combinations of far-flung special effects techniques — tinged with the rebellious and exuberant spirit that blossomed in Czechoslovakia during the 1960s. The film’s heroes are five boys stuck on a runaway airship soaring across the world as their small-minded parents and townsmen compete to transform their misfortune into a strategic opportunity for the yellow newspaper, shady capitalists, and government war-hawks. Art Nouveau influences mix with hyper-stylized pop art methodologies in dazzling composited images built with color-tinting, cut-out animations, hand-painted sets that look like Victorian engravings, newsprint, trick photography and stop-motion, juxtaposed eccentrically with wildlife footage and slapstick comedy.

Dir. Karel Zeman, 1967, HD Digital Presentation, 1967

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

SHOW & TELL: Daniel Johnston

chapterone2
5/1 - 7:15PM
$15/ free for members

Cinefamily Show & Tell invites artists, filmmakers, musicians and other cultural heroes to divulge their deepest, darkest media obsessions by opening their closets, digging through their attic and plundering their garages to curate an evening of… whatever they want to share! From thrift store finds to late-night Tivo, from foreign film bootlegs to home movies, from the popular to the perverse — all media will be presented live by the honored guests, as they take us on a personal tour of the audio, video and other ephemera that has inspired them, delighted them, or just plain freaked them out.

This edition brings beloved cult musician Daniel Johnston to Cinefamily! Long before The Devil and Daniel Johnston brought Daniel’s story to the mainstream, he played clubs and records stores in Austin and wandered the streets giving out his homemade cassette tapes, their fidelity wrecked through generations of duplication. Only a few people documented his performances with the then-pricey tools available at the time. One of those people was Daniel’s friend Marie Javins, an intern at the Austin Chronicle who stopped by to see Daniel after his famed 1987 breakdown. Now, almost 30 years later and with Daniel’s permission, we’ve unearthed this footage to share alongside unreleased home videos, Daniel’s favorite cartoons (including his frequent inspiration, Casper), and a whole host of surprises for completist Johnston fanatics, in celebration of an eclectic, productive career!

UNDERGROUND USA: INDIE CINEMA OF THE 80S - Jonathan Demme Presents: Made in Texas

madeintexas_480_309
5/1 - 9:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Production For Use

In the spring of 1981, Jonathan Demme visited Austin, Texas, where he ate BBQ, listened to punk rock, and looked at the work of a number of local independent filmmakers. Impressed by what he saw, Demme arranged for a program of Austin short films to be screened at the Collective for Living Cinema in New York City, a prestigious avant­ garde film collective of which he was a member. On October 10, 1981, the first Saturday evening after the Collective’s summer hiatus, Jonathan Demme Presents: Made in Texas – New Films From Austin was featured, including Speed of Light, Fair Sisters, Mask of Sarnath, Death of a Rock Star, Leonard Jr., and Invasion of the Aluminum People, six films that represent the punk rock and DIY aesthetic of Austin in the 1980s. The night it showed, the Collective was so crowded they had to turn people away and make the screening standing room only. This new restoration, made possible under the guidance of Austin Film Society and Production For Use’s Louis Black, is concerned with preserving the unique cultural moment of Austin in the late 70s and early 80s.

Dir. Louis Black, Missy Boswell, Brian Hansen, Tom Huckabee, Ed Lowery & Lorrie Oschatz, 1981, DCP Restoration, 116 min.

Watch the trailer!

Jen Kirkman: "I Know What I'm Doing — and Other Lies I Tell Myself" Book Release

kirkman_480_309
5/3 - 7:30PM
$20

I Know What I’m Doing — and Other Lies I Tell Myself: Dispatches from a Life Under Construction

Join comedian Jen Kirkman for a special book release show! Unlike a typical stand-up show, this is a night of Jen’s funny, personal, and cringe-worthy stories—aka “dispatches from a life under construction”—including tales of an awkward kid, teen, young, and now-technically-adult Jen. You’ll hear stories that aren’t in the book, followed by a reading from the book and a Q&A. Ask anything! Except don’t ask what the meaning of life is—Jen knows but she’s not gonna tell you. You figure it out.

Books will be for sale, and Jen will be available to sign them (and anything else) after the show.

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show

purple1_480_309
5/3 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/4)

purple3_480_309
5/4 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: The Falls

The Falls_480_309
5/4 - 7:30PM
$10/free for members

A mockumentary of epic proportions, The Falls is a bizarre universe unto itself: 92 people. 92 biographies in miniature. Every subject’s name beginning with “Fall,” all afflicted by the “Violent Unknown Event,” the symptoms of which include spontaneously speaking new languages and obsessing over birds. Within this cinematic encyclopedia, director Peter Greenaway (A Zed and Two Noughts, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover) combines found footage, pseudo-documentary, unlikely romance, Greek tragedy, science fiction, deadpan absurdist voiceover, and music from Michael Nyman and Brian Eno(!) for a sprawling compendium of ambitious ideas and tongue-in-cheek laughs. Standing apart from avant garde features and other unusually long experiments, The Falls is that rarest bird of all: It’s also very funny, filtered through a low-budget ethos and loaded with in-jokes as only a 5-year personal project could be. As The Falls’ intricate web of theories becomes increasingly surreal, Greenaway plays it straight as science fact, and the encyclopedic scope becomes nothing short of mind-boggling. Take flight with a rarely screened 16mm print!

Plus a potluck! Since this is a long one, (the director has suggested taking breaks) we’re hosting a potluck on the Cinefamily patio. Bring your favorite poultry dish or family-style side for sharing and we’ll enjoy as many snacks are there are characters in The Falls.

Dir. Peter Greenaway, 1980, 16mm (courtesy of Zeitgeist Films), 195 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Band of Outsiders + Opening Night Party!

godard3
5/5 - 7:30PM
$12/ free for members

Live Set from DJ Mukta Mohan of Honey Power + and KXLU 88.9fm!
Presented by La Collectionneuse!

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders, the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/5)

purplerain4_480_309
5/5 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/6)

purplerain_480_309
5/6 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

Slacker + Underground USA closing night party

slacker480x309
5/6 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Live Set from DJ Totally Abuse
35mm print courtesy of the Sundance Collection at the UCLA Film & Television Archive

Before A Scanner Darkly and Dazed and Confused, there was Slacker: Richard Linklater’s made-on-a-microbudget filmmaking debut. To describe it as “slice of life” would be a serious injustice; it’s more like that fly on the wall took ‘shrooms and went for a buzz around town, viewing the mythically weird Austin, Texas through an ADD-riddled, psychonautic lens. Behind the initial facade of mundane city action and eccentric characters, the camera becomes an omnipotent “eye in the sky,” flitting between deep explorations of daily life and easy distractibility—including breaks in the fourth wall—in what is now considered hallmark Linklater style.

The perfect close to our Underground USA series (stick around for the after-party!), Slacker is pure, early-90s grunge metropolitanism, so gritty, so adherent to reveling in the vivid and complex lives of strangers, that it holds a place as one of our favorite indie flicks. Besides, who can forget the scene about Madonna’s pap smear?

Dir. Richard Linklater, 1991, 35mm, 1991

Band of Outsiders

Godard Bande à part 1964 Band of outsiders Louvre running
5/6 - 10:30PM
$12/ free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders, the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

ABD's Saturday Morning Cartoons: Families!

oblongs_480_309
5/7 - 11AM
$10/free for members & children under 14

It’s Saturday Morning at Cinefamily, and this month we’re celebrating FAMILY with our favorite cartoon clans! The Flintstones, The Jetsons, The Simpsons, The Oblongs: these funny, flawed, and fictional families have always been at the heart of our favorite ‘toons, offering us our first glimpses into families other than our own. This month, we raise a bowl of sugary milk to Bam Bam Rubble, Augie Doggie, and all the cartoon moms, dads, brothers, and sisters we grew up with.

Pajamas not mandatory, but encouraged. Complimentary cereal bar with a rotation of the best sugary cereals on the market (featuring our monthly mix) and a cash bar for the grown ups who want their sugar delivered in the form of a mimosa.

Band of Outsiders

maxresdefault
5/7 - 7PM
$12/free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders , the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/7)

purplerain3_480_309
5/7 - 9:15PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/7)

purple1_480_309
5/7 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - Barbarella

barbarella_480_309
5/8 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!

With its elaborate set pieces and otherworldly costumes, Roger Vadim’s 1968 camp classic practically pulses with the vibrancy of peak sci-fi psychedelia. A pre-Hanoi Jane Fonda is magnetic as the titular astronautical aviatrix who carries this bit of wacky, futuristic erotica to next-level adventuretime on a quest to rid the world of the Positronic Ray (it was the Cold War, people!) and spread pure love throughout the universe. Crossing intergalactic paths with a blind angel, silver-fanged babydolls and a certain sadomasochistic invention dubbed “the Excessive Machine,” our heroine moves from her entirely (yes, even the ceiling) shag-carpeted spaceship to the core of the 16th planet of Tau Ceti in no less than eight fab-u-lous costume changes. With perhaps the most seductive spacesuit strip this side of Alien, Barbarella’s charm will float you out of the theater on the wings of Pygar; its psych-lounge tunes will follow you home.

Dir. Roger Vadim, 1968, 35mm, 98 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/8)

purplerain_website
5/8 - 3:45PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

Band of Outsiders

godard3
5/8 - 7:15PM
$12/ free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders , the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

Purple Rain + Prince Video Tribute Pre-show (5/8)

purplerain3_480_309
5/8 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Before scientists confirmed the formal discovery of the Higgs boson, Prince had already located the key to limitless sexual frenzy in this Oscar-winning crowning achievement of ‘80s culture. In his semi-autobiographical film debut, Prince plays The Kid, a Minneapolis club musician as alienated by his tumultuous home life as he is talented on stage. Sharp-dressed & quick-tongued scene-stealer Morris Day (from the band The Time) is his rival, both in music and in affection for sultry singer Apollonia. As the competition heats up, shirts are removed, hips gyrate, guitars ejaculate and Prince and the Revolution scorch the soundtrack with hits “When Doves Cry,” “Let’s Go Crazy,” and of course, “Purple Rain.”

Dir. Albert Magnoli, 1984, DCP, 111 min.

Band of Outsiders

Bande-à-part
5/10 - 10:30PM
$12/ free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders , the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

Band of Outsiders

Godard Bande à part 1964 Band of outsiders Louvre running
5/11 - 7:30PM
$12/ free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders , the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

Band of Outsiders

maxresdefault
5/11 - 10PM
$12/ free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders, the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (Opening Night Party!)

belladonna1_480_309
5/12 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

Live DJ set by PBDY of BRAINFEEDER!

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Band of Outsiders

Bande-à-part
5/12 - 10PM
$12/ free for members

After the first eight minutes of Band of Outsiders, the narrator (Godard) dryly offers a recap: “A pile of money. An English class. A house by the river. A romantic girl.” Like everything else in the film, this summation is an allusion to murder. An earnest tribute to crime cinema told via the idiosyncrasies of three young Parisians, Band of Outsiders sketches a naïve love triangle’s inexorable march to destruction. Arguably featuring Godard’s most iconic set pieces—the foot-race through the Louvre, the impromptu dance scene in a cafe that Tarantino and many others would homage — the film weaves together childlike tangents, marrying an obsession with American gangster movies and playful experimentation with language and meaning. Effusive and impulsive as Godard’s directorial hand, the film primarily orbits around its emotional and moral center, the legendary Anna Karina — heartfelt even as she coyly glances at the lens and reminds us that she’s just an actress playing a character.

Dir Jean-Luc Godard, 1964, DCP (Restoration courtesy of Rialto Pictures), 97 min.

Watch the trailer!

CHANTAL AKERMAN: CONTRE LOUBLI/AGAINST OBLIVION - No Home Movie

nohomemovie_480_309
5/13 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

The opening shot of No Home Movie, more turbulent than perhaps any other scene from Chantal Akerman’s body of work, is a tree struggling frame-left as it is violently whipped by an unrelenting, gale-force wind. Clocking in at just under four uncut minutes, this shot readies us for the patient pace of the Belgian auteur’s final masterpiece. We observe Akerman and her mother as they spend time together and apart, primarily within the context of domestic interiors in both Belgium and New York City. With deliberate frames and a calm unfolding of time, certain moments loan themselves to the sensation of gazing upon a large-scale Edward Hopper painting that suddenly and subtly begins to breath. Awash in some of the final documented interactions between the filmmaker and her adored mother, Akerman doesn’t ask you to understand this work — she just asks you to feel it. Rounding out our involvement in a city-wide retrospective of her work, No Home Movie is an essential experience for the Akerman completist.

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 2015, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/13)

belladonna2_480_309
5/13 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

THE SILENT TREATMENT: Sally of the Sawdust

sally_480_309
5/14 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Presented in 35mm courtesy of the Library of Congress

A rare comedy from the typically austere D.W. Griffith, Sally of the Sawdust is a delightful gem and the veritable kick off of W.C. Fields’s unmatched career. Based on the 1923 stage musical Poppy, Sally is rife with what we now know as trademark Fields — bumbling idiocy, juggling, dog-kicking — all in the midst of circus antics galore.

Fields plays Prof. Eustace, a lovably notorious juggler who becomes the unlikely guardian of Sally after her mother (rejected by her affluent parents for marrying a lowly circus performer) dies in an accident. Eustace raises Sally in the circus and passes on all of his survival tricks, until one day their work leads them to the same town where Sally’s snooty grandparents live.

Dir. D.W. Griffith, 1925, 35mm (Courtesy of L.O.C.), 104 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/14)

belladonna3_480_309
5/14 - 7:45PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - Robinson Crusoe on Mars

robinsoncrusoe_480_309
5/15 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!

Deep in space, astronaut Christopher “Kit” Draper has found himself marooned on that intergalactic inferno: Mars. Demoralized by its hellish desolation, Kit dictates what he fears may be his final words onto his space-age 8-track, the hissing and popping of fireballs and flame pits roaring in the background. But primate pal Mona won’t let Kit give up so quickly, and so kickstarts his space race for survival! Shot in gorgeous widescreen technicolor, Robinson Crusoe on Mars is hard sci-fi, equal parts mood piece and extraterrestrial thriller. It’s got the bleeps, bloops, and blinking radars you’d expect, but you won’t be ready for the beautifully composed cinematography and staggeringly gorgeous sets of this galactic story of perseverance. If anything, this premium chunk of asteroidal gold proves that hell isn’t other people — it’s a place in space!

Dir. Byron Haskin, 1964, HDCAM, 110 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

CHANTAL AKERMAN: CONTRE LOUBLI/AGAINST OBLIVION - No Home Movie

nohomemovie1_480_309
5/15 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

The opening shot of No Home Movie, more turbulent than perhaps any other scene from Chantal Akerman’s body of work, is a tree struggling frame-left as it is violently whipped by an unrelenting, gale-force wind. Clocking in at just under four uncut minutes, this shot readies us for the patient pace of the Belgian auteur’s final masterpiece. We observe Akerman and her mother as they spend time together and apart, primarily within the context of domestic interiors in both Belgium and New York City. With deliberate frames and a calm unfolding of time, certain moments loan themselves to the sensation of gazing upon a large-scale Edward Hopper painting that suddenly and subtly begins to breath. Awash in some of the final documented interactions between the filmmaker and her adored mother, Akerman doesn’t ask you to understand this work — she just asks you to feel it. Rounding out our involvement in a city-wide retrospective of her work, No Home Movie is an essential experience for the Akerman completist.

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 2015, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/15)

belladonna4_480_309
5/15 - 7:45PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/16)

belladonna5_480_309
5/16 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Five Corners (presented by Kevin Corrigan)

fivecorners_480_309
5/17 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Indie raconteur and conversationalist par excellance Kevin Corrigan joins us to present one of his favorite films, Five Corners. Presciently cast (with Tim Robbins, John Turturro, and Jodie Foster) the film is a snapshot of a moment in New York, — 1964 in the Bronx, to be precise. What could be a slice of life film set amidst the youth-centricity that defined the civil rights movement era, Corners quickly takes a sharp turn towards the low-budget crime drama genre, unfolding in a frenzied 24-hour span.

Dir. Tony Bill, 1987, 35mm, 90 min.

CHANTAL AKERMAN: CONTRE LOUBLI/AGAINST OBLIVION - No Home Movie

nohomemovie2_480_309
5/17 - 10PM
$12/free for members

The opening shot of No Home Movie, more turbulent than perhaps any other scene from Chantal Akerman’s body of work, is a tree struggling frame-left as it is violently whipped by an unrelenting, gale-force wind. Clocking in at just under four uncut minutes, this shot readies us for the patient pace of the Belgian auteur’s final masterpiece. We observe Akerman and her mother as they spend time together and apart, primarily within the context of domestic interiors in both Belgium and New York City. With deliberate frames and a calm unfolding of time, certain moments loan themselves to the sensation of gazing upon a large-scale Edward Hopper painting that suddenly and subtly begins to breath. Awash in some of the final documented interactions between the filmmaker and her adored mother, Akerman doesn’t ask you to understand this work — she just asks you to feel it. Rounding out our involvement in a city-wide retrospective of her work, No Home Movie is an essential experience for the Akerman completist.

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 2015, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the trailer!

CHANTAL AKERMAN: CONTRE LOUBLI/AGAINST OBLIVION - No Home Movie

nohomemovie3_480_309
5/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

The opening shot of No Home Movie, more turbulent than perhaps any other scene from Chantal Akerman’s body of work, is a tree struggling frame-left as it is violently whipped by an unrelenting, gale-force wind. Clocking in at just under four uncut minutes, this shot readies us for the patient pace of the Belgian auteur’s final masterpiece. We observe Akerman and her mother as they spend time together and apart, primarily within the context of domestic interiors in both Belgium and New York City. With deliberate frames and a calm unfolding of time, certain moments loan themselves to the sensation of gazing upon a large-scale Edward Hopper painting that suddenly and subtly begins to breath. Awash in some of the final documented interactions between the filmmaker and her adored mother, Akerman doesn’t ask you to understand this work — she just asks you to feel it. Rounding out our involvement in a city-wide retrospective of her work, No Home Movie is an essential experience for the Akerman completist.

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 2015, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/18)

Belladonna6_480_309
5/18 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness (5/19)

belladonna1_480_309
5/19 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

CHANTAL AKERMAN: CONTRE LOUBLI/AGAINST OBLIVION - No Home Movie

hohomemovie4_480_309
5/19 - 10PM
$12/free for members

The opening shot of No Home Movie, more turbulent than perhaps any other scene from Chantal Akerman’s body of work, is a tree struggling frame-left as it is violently whipped by an unrelenting, gale-force wind. Clocking in at just under four uncut minutes, this shot readies us for the patient pace of the Belgian auteur’s final masterpiece. We observe Akerman and her mother as they spend time together and apart, primarily within the context of domestic interiors in both Belgium and New York City. With deliberate frames and a calm unfolding of time, certain moments loan themselves to the sensation of gazing upon a large-scale Edward Hopper painting that suddenly and subtly begins to breath. Awash in some of the final documented interactions between the filmmaker and her adored mother, Akerman doesn’t ask you to understand this work — she just asks you to feel it. Rounding out our involvement in a city-wide retrospective of her work, No Home Movie is an essential experience for the Akerman completist.

Dir. Chantal Akerman, 2015, DCP, 115 min.

Watch the trailer!

FRIDAY NIGHT FRIGHTS: Venom (New Restoration!)

venom_480_309
5/20 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Blue Underground

Catching the tail-end of the “animals attack” boom started by Jaws, Venom, from 1981, gives the genre a welcome, crime-story/home invasion twist. Set in a London townhouse, the story involves a scheme to kidnap an asthmatic boy, who just so happens to have recently acquired a deadly Black Mambo snake by accident, which gets loose in the London townhouse’s vents. Oh wait, did I mention the cast features a who’s who of international superstars, including Klaus Kinski, Oliver Reed, Nicol Williamson, Susan George, Sterling Hayden and Micheal Gogh??!! Things get Ten Little Indians as the snake picks off the kidnappers one by one, allowing director Piers Haggard to deftly ratchet up the hissing, slithering tension. In a world lousy with Sharknados and Sharktopuses, this real-deal creature feature deserves a revisit. If fear is what your craving, Venom is the antidote!

Dir. Piers Haggard, 1981, Digital Presentation, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - Forbidden Planet

forbiddenplanet_480_309
5/22 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by warnerarchive_300_90

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!

In an era when Eisenhower campaigned the terrestrial western front, a certain Starship C-57D made its way into our intergalactic hearts in Forbidden Planet, the mid-century harbinger of countless cinematic science fictions yet to come. Prepare to reverse polarity and set sail to the interstellar skies of planet Altair IV with Commander John J. Adams — a fresh-faced Leslie Nielsen! — as he and his crew navigate some seriously vivacious production design, the wonders of the great Krell machine, and the sentient consciousness of Robby the Robot, the first cognitive android in filmic history. Open your ear-holes to the electronic tonalities of Louis and Bebe Barron, whose lush soundscape marks the advent of the entirely electronic soundtrack. Leave Earth behind and join us for the perfect blend of cosmic cocktails and the definitive Technicolor sci-fi experience.

Dir. Fred M. Wilcox, 1956, 35mm, 98 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

GREG PROOPS FILM CLUB: Touchez pas au grisbi

proops_grisbi_480_309-5
5/24 - 7:30PM
$12/ free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for Touchez pas au grisbi. Greg sez: Touchez pas au grisbi means, “Hands off the loot.” It’s that simple baby. Classic Noir and all-time groovy French gangster film. The immortal Jean Gabin, whose face looks like a punch being thrown, is a world-weary hood who is pulled out of retirement to do one last job when his pal is kidnapped. A duplicitous dame — the very young Jeanne Moreau — has spilled the beans to her gangster boyfriend and the game is on. Can the old man beat the fresh punks? Elegant and understated, the first time I saw this people in the theater cheered for a refrigerator full of champagne in his throw-down crib in Paris. Classy action with dark exteriors, showgirls, and tommy guns. Be there and wear shades. Sadly you must smoke outside. Unmissable if you are cool.

Dir Jacques Becker, 1954, 35mm, 96 min.

Jonathan Lethem presents "Bigger Than Life"

7822_Bigger-Than-Life-03
5/25 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

New York Times best-selling author and MacArthur fellow Jonathan Lethem joins us to present Nicholas Ray’s Bigger Than Life. A family drama with a Hitchcockian streak, Bigger Than Life is an Eisenhower-era paranoia-laden CinemaScope masterpiece, based on a piece in the New Yorker authored by medical writer Berton Roueché. Careening between melodrama, sci-fi, and horror — Lethem calls the film “Douglas Sirk meets Oliver Sacks” — this poignant and precise vision of ‘50s American life and the fantasy/nightmare of the nuclear family plays like speculative fiction, with medical experiments acting as a harbinger for wild fears of fascism, state power, and class shame. Ray expertly teases out the precariousness inherent in the explicit conventionality of James Mason, Barbara Rush, and Walter Matthau’s characters — a school teacher, his wife, and his best friend, respectively. The group who, as Lethem notes, “rest uneasily on their bed of normality,” feel their quotidian lives violently upended in a Shining-esque trip down a post-WWII Americana rabbit hole.

The film will be followed by a conversation with Lethem.

Dir. Nicholas Ray, 1956, DCP, 95 min.

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - The Green Slime

greenslime_480_309
5/29 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by warnerarchive_300_90

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!

“Nothing ever happens here,” moans a grumpy space technician. Suddenly, right on cue, an asteroid teeming with extraterrestrial green goo is on a collision course with Earth! What follows is a delectable smorgasbord of charmingly constructed space station miniatures, non-sequiturs delivered with the stiffest of lips, and special effects so cheap they wouldn’t even sell off of a clearance rack. In simpler terms: It’s B-movie heaven. Watch as crew members of Gamma 3 get picked off one-by-one, with each death more bizarrely gory than the next. Defying logic at every turn (why is sentient, chiseled jaw Commander Jack Rankin’s first battle instinct always to throw things at the aliens, including his laser gun?), The Green Slime is a delirious, self-serious, silly alien creature feature of the highest order. Come for the aliens with bloodshot, perma-stoned eyes; stay for the flubbed line readings and psych-rock theme song.

Dir. Kinji Fukasaku, 1968, 35mm (Courtesy of BFI), 90 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

HANGOVER MATINEES: THE COLOR OF SPACE - The War of the Worlds

waroftheworlds_480_309
6/12 - 1PM
$12/free for members

Live Set from DJ Mean Mr. Mustard!

Byron Haskin’s 1953 War of the Worlds (adapted from the story by H.G. Wells) lives and breathes Technicolor, determined to play out like a “realistic” alien invasion. Ricocheting between news reel narration highlighting the effects of the attack worldwide, and the still-fresh memories of WW2 and the atomic bomb — via shockingly violent battle sequences — Worlds is the quintessential marriage of Technicolor and sci-fi. A grab bag loaded with square dancing, instantaneous cremation, delightfully innovative special effects, and a handful of oddly chilling, one-eyed (three-lensed), anemic, seemingly merciless invaders, it’s a shockingly eerie and unsettling oddity of ‘50s sci-fi, equal parts intelligent and goofy. With heaping spoonfuls of scientific explanation delivered by a hunky leading man, we promise this gem’s eye-popping color will melt your puny humanoid brain.

Dir. Byron Haskin, 1953, 35mm, 85 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Page 1 of 3812345...102030...Last »
http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org