The Love Witch

Site7
1/19 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

For acolytes of old-school celluloid, 2016 offered no better way to live deliciously than Anna Biller’s mesmeric and hilarious The Love Witch. Biller, a high priestess in the dark art of cinematic enticement, wrote, produced, designed, directed and edited this adoring 1960s throwback, which traces the left-handed path of a love-starved sorceress (Samantha Robinson, a dead ringer for giallo diva Edwige Fenech), whose magical seductions spell toil and trouble for weak-willed men. Just as the lurid colors of classic Eurosleaze cloak the film’s unmistakably feminist heart, Biller’s celluloid fetishism is more than mere camp: shot, edited and projected at Cinefamily in dazzling 35mm, The Love Witch summons the alchemical power of cinema as a medium for unleashing desire and as a communal form of ritual lovemaking. See it with someone you hex!

Dir. Anna Biller, 2016, 35mm, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

What Have I Done to Deserve This?

whathaveidone
1/19 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

With a set by DJ Nadie

A wild flourish of a movie, Almodóvar’s fourth feature revels in the mid-60′s Godardian toolbox while aesthetically honing in on the malaise of an urban housewife in Madrid. That may sound dark, but this is Pedro we’re talking here, so the film’s fishing-line of a plot serves more as an excuse for sex jokes, absurdist twists, and visual inventiveness. What Have I Done To Deserve This? shows Almodóvar at peak critical experimentation: every frame, color, and camera swirl is intricately and delightfully plotted. Yet in the midst of the comedic chaos, the film always returns to reflective moments of denouement, in which Almodóvar turns his camera on the thoroughfares and clothesline-strewn apartment projects of post-Franco Madrid.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 1984, DCP, 101min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Skin I Live In (Encore!)

skin i live in
1/19 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

“There are several genres nimbly folded into The Skin I Live In, which might also be described as an existential mystery, a melodramatic thriller, a medical horror film or just a polymorphous extravaganza. In other words, it’s an Almodóvar movie with all the attendant gifts that implies: lapidary technique, calculated perversity, intelligent wit.” – Manohla Dargis

There are times at which The Skin I Live in feels so absurd, so ignorant of its audience’s propensity for obedience, that the film threatens to leap into madness and lose all credibility. Pedro’s foray into horror packs more plot twists than you’ll know what to do with, with each reveal more shocking than the last – but even a skeptic can’t help but be taken in by this tale’s absurd twists, masterfully orchestrated with flashbacks and surveillance cameras, all the while recalling the Master of Suspense and touchstone Vertigo. Mad scientist Antonio Banderas is a truly repulsive figure, but he’s magnetic nonetheless, reminding us that the way men and women look at each other – in every variation of this gesture under the sun – is Almodóvar’s bread and butter.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 2011, 35mm, 120 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Love Witch

Site6
1/20 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

For acolytes of old-school celluloid, 2016 offered no better way to live deliciously than Anna Biller’s mesmeric and hilarious The Love Witch. Biller, a high priestess in the dark art of cinematic enticement, wrote, produced, designed, directed and edited this adoring 1960s throwback, which traces the left-handed path of a love-starved sorceress (Samantha Robinson, a dead ringer for giallo diva Edwige Fenech), whose magical seductions spell toil and trouble for weak-willed men. Just as the lurid colors of classic Eurosleaze cloak the film’s unmistakably feminist heart, Biller’s celluloid fetishism is more than mere camp: shot, edited and projected at Cinefamily in dazzling 35mm, The Love Witch summons the alchemical power of cinema as a medium for unleashing desire and as a communal form of ritual lovemaking. See it with someone you hex!

Dir. Anna Biller, 2016, 35mm, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Fight the Power: Inauguration night at Cinefamily (Free with RSVP!)

unnamed
1/20 - 7:30PM
Free (first-come, first-serve)

Co-presented by Women of Cinefamily and the Women’s Center for Creative Work

RSVP to this FREE (first come, first serve) event here.

Come gather with us post-inauguration, on the eve of the historic Women’s March on Washington, to revel in the spirit of radical resistance. We’ll kick off the night with a Cinefamily original Fight the Power mixtape featuring great moments in protest cinema and then follow with a special selection of rare, subversive, and wildly inventive 16mm protest films from the 60s to the 90s, curated by Lost and Found Film Club.

Afterwards, join us on the patio for provisions and a protest sign making party (supplies provided) hosted by art collective/DJs Honey Power, in preparation for the LA Women’s March on 1/21!

Program includes:
Cinefamily original Fight the Power mixtape
Be-In Dir. Jerry Abrams, 1967, 16mm, 7 min.
Evil of Dracula Dir. Martha Colburn, 1998, 16mm, 2 min.
The Resistance Dir. Leonard M. Henny, 1968, 16mm, 16 min.
Testing, testing, how do you do? Dir. Sheila Page, digital presentation, 4min.
The Campaign Dir. Tom Palazzolo, 1968, 16mm, 12 min.
Rat Life and Diet in North America Dir. Joyce Wieland, 1968, 16mm, 14 min.
+more!

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. A Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

WCCW_Logo

The Women’s Center for Creative Work is a not-for-profit organization that cultivates LA’s feminist creative communities and practices. Become a member​ ​today ​at womenscenterforcreativework.com/join-us ​to help us dismantle the patriarchy, one female-led project at a time.

Labyrinth of Passion

labyrinthofpassion
1/20 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Labyrinth of Passion, Almodóvar’s delirious second feature, out-screws just about every screwball comedy that came before it. The perversely overstuffed plot follows nymphomaniac punk singer Sexilia, whose love affair with a disguised gay son of a Middle Eastern emperor is threatened by a group of terrorists led by a former lover (Antonio Banderas, in his first role) and haunted by repressed childhood traumas. Veering gleefully off-course at every turn, the narrative often disappears underneath surreal subplots and inflammatory set-pieces (including a sneering disco-punk musical number sung by the director himself), recalling the dirty-minded digressions of an earlier Spanish provocateur, Luis Buñuel. Like his subversive predecessor, Almodóvar presents society as a complex maze of sexual dysfunction, but Labyrinth isn’t some arthouse brain-teaser: it’s a bratty, coked-up, incestuous, orgiastic, scatological romantic comedy about the transformative power of true love.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 1982, HDCAM, 100 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

High Heels

highheels
1/21 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

Almodóvar gives free rein to his most outrageous impulses in High Heels, a delectably tasteless postmodern soap opera. Irreverently channelling sordid Old Hollywood sagas like Mommie Dearest, this art-damaged cocktail of glamour, resentment, sex, pills and murder teeters wildly between ludicrous melodrama and lacerating satire. High Heels may not be Almodóvar’s most revered effort, but it boasts two perfectly pitched leads (Marisa Paredes as a man-eating, globe-trotting pop star; Victoria Abril as her unstable, long-neglected daughter) and the scarlet stamp of its director’s caustic wit. It may come on like an old-fashioned tearjerker, but when it really gets unhinged–an astonishing live TV confession translated into sign language, an out-of-nowhere song and dance number in the most fashionable women’s prison in film history–you’re more likely to be crying of laughter.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 1991, DCP, 112 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Law of Desire

lawofdesire1
1/21 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Coming off a desire-soaked, cresting thriller high in Matador, Pedro set his sights on a convoluted homosexual love triangle in The Law of Desire. Pablo (Eusebio Poncela), a gay film director and writer, finds himself bored of cocaine nightlife and his young lover Juan (Miguel Molina), but finds his passion reignited by a new youngster (Antonio Banderas) while producing a one-woman show for his transsexual sister Tina (Almodóvar regular Carmen Maura). A masterful display of pacing and tone, The Law of Desire cemented Almodóvar’s status as a great filmmaker and helped to propel Antonio Banderas to international fame. Pauline Kael wrote of the film (alongside Raising Arizona) in The New Yorker, “Almodóvar’s tone is not like anyone else’s… this director manages to joke about the self-dramatizing that can go on at the movies, and at the same time reactivate it. The film is festive. It doesn’t disguise its narcissism; it turns it into bright-colored tragicomedy.”

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 1987, DCP, 101 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!

tiemeup
1/21 - 10PM
$12/free for members

This followup to the international success of Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown finds Ricky (Antonio Banderas) destructively infatuated with sub-par porno actress and former junkie Marina (Victoria Abril) after his release from a mental institution. Oscillating between unhinged and utterly charming–sometimes within the same scene–Banderas’ pathetic yet charismatic performance keeps the tone lighter than should be humanely possible, especially for the depiction of a relationship simply reeking of dysfunction. Popping primary colors inhabit the fashions and the apartments of this world, belying both the agony–and eventually, underscoring the ecstasy–of a Stockholm syndrome-induced romance. Slapped with an X-rating from the MPAA upon its controversial stateside release for a certain bathtub scene that suggests (gasp!) women might masturbate, Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! was one of a handful of films that proved instrumental in the argument for the NC-17 rating to be wedged between the meaningless R and the hardcore X. So what is the line between admiring and leering? Almodóvar pretends he doesn’t know the answer–and fools us, if only momentarily, into believing we might not, either.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 1989, 35mm, 101 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Flower of My Secret

The Flower of My Secret
1/22 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

Taking a break from the hyperbole and sardonic irony typical of his wilder forays into absurdist comedy, Almodóvar’s The Flower of My Secret explores the life of romance novelist Leo Macias, a woman so self-hating, she develops one pseudonym solely to publicly attack the other. Giving us a glimpse into the boy who certainly sat cross-legged on his family room floor listening to his female relatives laugh, cry, kvetch and gossip, Almodóvar exhibits a dexterity of dialogue that could come only from a most keen observer of human behavior–including all the vitriol and, ultimately, forgiveness that comes with it. Those familiar with his later film Volver will giggle at the plot of Leo’s discarded “black” novel, The Freezer, while true Pedro fans will recognize her friend Betty’s vocation as a precursor to a sub-plot in his later, Oscar-winning All About My Mother.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 1995, DCP, 103 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Julieta

julieta
1/22 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Almodóvar’s latest is yet another testament to his unwavering commitment to familial drama, the inner lives of women, and suspense in the Hitchcockian sense. With the elegance typical of his later work, he weaves together three stories by Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro, swapping the original chilly Canadian landscapes for the bright reds and mediterranean blues of Spain, of course. By way of a Hitchcock blonde – played by two women – an 80s story and a contemporary one unfold, and Almodóvar reminds us that while the Summer of Love was in 1969, the late-blooming Spain ushered in its own sexual revolution in the post-Franco 80s. Come for the salacious rendezvous on a train, stay for excellent performances from the film’s leading ladies.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 2016, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Volver (encore)

volver
1/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

In the hands of a lesser filmmaker, Volver’s talky plot and broad-stroke themes – sex, death, family, small-town superstition – might come off as kitsch. But Almodóvar’s framing and image balance sensibilities, his splashes of color and scope of space, lead up to one of the most eminently visually watchable movies of the decade. Penelope Cruz (at the height of her powers) leads a cast of working women in Madrid and the small-town La Mancha region through a tale of spectres, patricide, film crew soirees, and female relationships. If De Palma took the Hitchcockian aesthetic to the next logical level of formalist violence, then by contrast, Almodóvar’s take on the master is having fun with it all, from the canted camera angles to an absurdist dead body disposal. It’s also one of the most purely fun movies of its time, a reminder disappearing small-scale, yet ambitious cinema.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 2006, 35mm, 121 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Love Witch

Site5
1/23 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

For acolytes of old-school celluloid, 2016 offered no better way to live deliciously than Anna Biller’s mesmeric and hilarious The Love Witch. Biller, a high priestess in the dark art of cinematic enticement, wrote, produced, designed, directed and edited this adoring 1960s throwback, which traces the left-handed path of a love-starved sorceress (Samantha Robinson, a dead ringer for giallo diva Edwige Fenech), whose magical seductions spell toil and trouble for weak-willed men. Just as the lurid colors of classic Eurosleaze cloak the film’s unmistakably feminist heart, Biller’s celluloid fetishism is more than mere camp: shot, edited and projected at Cinefamily in dazzling 35mm, The Love Witch summons the alchemical power of cinema as a medium for unleashing desire and as a communal form of ritual lovemaking. See it with someone you hex!

Dir. Anna Biller, 2016, 35mm, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Private Rental

1/24 - 7PM

For this timeslot, we will not be open to the public, as some lucky patron has rented our theater — both supporting the Cinefamily and using the beautiful Silent Movie Theatre for their own event. The theater can be yours, too! Weddings, premieres of your film with an on-site afterparty, business-related entertaining, great birthdays, bar or bat mitzvahs, or any other kind of celebration you can imagine — it’s better at the movies. For more information, email “events@cinefamily.org”

555 (with Kate Berlant, John Early, and Andrew DeYoung)

555
1/25 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

World Premiere! Catch this Vimeo Original before it’s released!

From the minds of Kate Berlant, John Early and Andrew DeYoung, 555 is an anthology miniseries of five short films that unfold in a stark, humid, surreality of Hollywood. These short, cinematic fairy tales are set in tinsel town, where status is everything and the stakes are high. The backdrop is big dreams, and in the foreground, the humiliations of clawing one’s way toward them. Will greed, egotism, ignorance and desire consume them? Or can they escape dark fates by clinging to rare moments of tenderness?

The Love Witch

Site7
1/25 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

With a set by DJ Crimson Creature

For acolytes of old-school celluloid, 2016 offered no better way to live deliciously than Anna Biller’s mesmeric and hilarious The Love Witch. Biller, a high priestess in the dark art of cinematic enticement, wrote, produced, designed, directed and edited this adoring 1960s throwback, which traces the left-handed path of a love-starved sorceress (Samantha Robinson, a dead ringer for giallo diva Edwige Fenech), whose magical seductions spell toil and trouble for weak-willed men. Just as the lurid colors of classic Eurosleaze cloak the film’s unmistakably feminist heart, Biller’s celluloid fetishism is more than mere camp: shot, edited and projected at Cinefamily in dazzling 35mm, The Love Witch summons the alchemical power of cinema as a medium for unleashing desire and as a communal form of ritual lovemaking. See it with someone you hex!

Dir. Anna Biller, 2016, 35mm, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Naked

naked 2
1/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Like a fiery street preacher, Naked barges into your space and your psyche, insistently haranguing you and demanding attention. In Mike Leigh’s all-too-human miserablist drama/void-black comedy, crude misanthrope Johnny (David Thewlis) squats at his ex-girlfriend’s apartment and lambasts his way through the streets of London, ranting about space, God, evolution, The Odyssey, the Apocalypse – anything to anyone who’ll listen, especially if they have cigarettes. It’s a fascinating portrait of a deeply intelligent, horribly cruel and pessimistic character – at home in a film that sulks in theatrical existentialism and kitchen sink realism. Thewlis’s mesmerizing performance and Leigh’s top-notch storytelling are almost able to humanize this ugly outcast – not with redemptive clichés, but with rare and shocking emotional integrity most artists would flinch at.

Dir. Mike Leigh, 1993, 16mm, 126 min.

The Love Witch

Site6
1/26 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

For acolytes of old-school celluloid, 2016 offered no better way to live deliciously than Anna Biller’s mesmeric and hilarious The Love Witch. Biller, a high priestess in the dark art of cinematic enticement, wrote, produced, designed, directed and edited this adoring 1960s throwback, which traces the left-handed path of a love-starved sorceress (Samantha Robinson, a dead ringer for giallo diva Edwige Fenech), whose magical seductions spell toil and trouble for weak-willed men. Just as the lurid colors of classic Eurosleaze cloak the film’s unmistakably feminist heart, Biller’s celluloid fetishism is more than mere camp: shot, edited and projected at Cinefamily in dazzling 35mm, The Love Witch summons the alchemical power of cinema as a medium for unleashing desire and as a communal form of ritual lovemaking. See it with someone you hex!

Dir. Anna Biller, 2016, 35mm, 120 min.

Watch the trailer!

Talk to Her (encore)

talktoher
1/27 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

It’s truly rare for a filmmaker to produce at the height of their powers more than 20+ years into a career – but to paraphrase Orson Welles, Talk to Her is the movie that Almodóvar should offer up as bargain for his entrance to heaven. The plot is exceedingly simple: the lives of two men intersect in a hospital ward as they watch over women in comas. As with Volver a few years later, Almodóvar excavates familiar emotional spaces afforded by this simplicity, breaking free of his past genre and virtuosic technical experiments. His usual obsessions are on display, but explored with a newfound grace – every cut, frame orchestration, and tonal shift is loosely calibrated and intensely moving. From the first shot, Almodóvar reaches a heightened, hallucinatory dream-state with Talk To Her, producing a pure cinema that ultimately netted him an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. (P.S.: see if you can spot Pina Bausch’s cameo as herself in the Cafe Muller scene!)

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 2002, 35mm, 112 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness

Belladonna6_480_309
1/27 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Hitcher

745v3bQcYts60OsjYuHA8HNhIF2
1/27 - MIDNITE
$12/free for members

The Hitcher is a picture-perfect nightmare played out on celluloid, praying upon our TV-fed paranoia and the strange familiarity of the open road — that last no man’s land. Pursued by an inescapable, mythic-yet-mundane villain played by method-acting madman Rutger Hauer, C. Thomas Howell is plunged into an Americana-infused anxiety dream from which there is no respite – if only he’d heeded his mother’s advice: “never pick up hitch-hikers.” With a starkly compelling script by mastermind Eric Red (Body Parts) and beautiful sequences of sun-drenched, desert driving insanity from director Robert Harmon, this masterpiece of ’80s horror is an existential thrill ride, highlighting the terror and vulnerability of being in transit, of being between two points, and of being nowhere at all. The only barrier between you and the savage world is the weak, metal frame of your car — which ain’t enough to stop a shotgun wielding fiend from taking you on one explosive journey right into the grinning mouth of madness. Buckle up!

Dir. Robert Harmon, 1986, 35mm, 97 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Bad Education (encore)

badeducation
1/28 - 7PM
$12/free for members

The prospect of Gael Garcia Bernal as a transvestite femme fatale with a score to settle should be enough to draw you in, but don’t come to Bad Education expecting mere eye candy: this dazzling and disturbing tale of trauma, blackmail and mistaken identity is one of Almodóvar’s darkest works. Genre fans will delight as Almodóvar’s cinephiliac imagination queers the conventions of noir: between multilayered flashbacks, gender-bending and back-stabbing, Bad Education is an “out” Out of the Past, a cross-dressing Criss-Cross. A perfect example of the director’s violent eroticism, the film is undeniably hot, but it also burns with anger: at the center of its intricate narrative is a profound outrage at the transgressions of abusive priests, made at the height of the scandals that rocked the Catholic Church in the mid-2000s. Nothing is what it seems in Bad Education, but one thing is certain: you’ll never hear “Moon River” the same way again.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 2004, 35mm, 106 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Mutant Hunt

SFT_MUTANT HUNT_2017_FINAL
1/28 - 10PM
$12/free for members

SHOCK FEATURE THEATER RETURNS!

Rob Schrab recreates a local TV creature feature show complete with vintage commercials, and musical guest The Git Back Gang!

Horrible hostess of the darkness, Mini Coffee, and Ookie the puppet start 2017 strong with Tim Kincaid (Breeders, Robot Holocaust, Joe Gage Sex Files Vol. 1: Jack-off Party at Billy Bob’s)’s MUTANT HUNT – “A vicious genetic scientist, discovers a way to alter harmless cyborgs into blood-thirsty mutants that kill for pleasure! Now, Matt Riker must hunt the mutants before they hunt him first.”

Husbands and Wives 25th Anniversary screening and Built By Wendy T-shirt release!

08-JD-JudyDavis-HusbandsWives
1/29 - 4:30PM
$12/free for members

Wendy Mullin’s cult designs for her label, Built By Wendy, have always had the mark of a cinephile – especially her coveted t-shirts. Join us for a t-shirt release party for Built By Wendy’s brand new, original Husbands & Wives tee, along with a screening of the film!

With scenes from two marriages, an ensemble cast – featuring Woody himself, Mia Farrow, Sydney Pollack, and the film’s true star, Judy Davis at peak New York-neurotic – tackles divorce with a capital D. As cinematic serendipity would have it, Farrow and Allen’s real life and onscreen splits collided for a 1992 release date, lending a bit of gravitas to the talky breakup extravaganza that is Husbands and Wives. À la 60s Godard, the drama is bracketed by confessional, pseudo-documentary style interviews/therapy sessions, while Juliette Lewis – in her own star-making turn – ponders the degree to which her developing relationship with her professor (Allen) is Freudian. On 35mm!

Dir. Woody Allen, 1992, 35mm, 103 min.

Watch the trailer!

Julieta (encore!)

julieta
1/29 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Almodóvar’s latest is yet another testament to his unwavering commitment to familial drama, the inner lives of women, and suspense in the Hitchcockian sense. With the elegance typical of his later work, he weaves together three stories by Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro, swapping the original chilly Canadian landscapes for the bright reds and mediterranean blues of Spain, of course. By way of a Hitchcock blonde – played by two women – an 80s story and a contemporary one unfold, and Almodóvar reminds us that while the Summer of Love was in 1969, the late-blooming Spain ushered in its own sexual revolution in the post-Franco 80s. Come for the salacious rendezvous on a train, stay for excellent performances from the film’s leading ladies.

Dir. Pedro Almodóvar, 2016, DCP, 99 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

MA (w/ director Celia Rowlson-Hall in person!)

MA_Still_7_by_IanBloom
1/30 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

In an arid desert landscape littered with tumbleweed, cheap motels, and unnamed characters, a modern-day Mother Mary makes a pilgrimage. Director, star – and perhaps most notably – superb choreographer Celia Rowlson-Hall’s MA is a sensory trip across the scorched American Southwest, its ritualistic and surreal affect articulated with the body and landscape, not dialogue. Alternately haunting and sublime, MA is a true experiment in contemporary filmmaking; the virgin mother gives birth to our savior, but is also challenged to save herself.

Dir. Celia Rowlson-Hall, 2015, DCP 80 min.

Watch the trailer!

Belladonna of Sadness

belladonna5_480_309
1/30 - 10:15PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Zodiac

still-of-jake-gyllenhaal-in-zodiac-2007-large-picture
2/9 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Steeped in one of California’s most notorious unsolved serial murder cases (and we have a few) is Zodiac, the understated but terrifying psycho-thriller from old pro David Fincher (Se7en, The Social Network, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). Knitting the swinging pastiche of a liberated 60s San Francisco – Haight Ashbury, anyone? – with the little we know of the gruesome murderer who taunted police and press from the anonymity of assumed bohemia, Fincher deals in both truth and fiction in his retelling of the story of a newspaper cartoonist (lamp-eyed Jake Gyllenhaal, of course) whose amateur quest to find the Zodiac may prove to be a path of no return.

With an ensemble cast of knockouts (Robert Downey Jr., Chloe Sevigny, and Mark Ruffalo), sweeping visual odes to classic California, and a near-perfect score that collides bright cozy oldies with plenty of uneasy piano, Zodiac lifts the gilded petals of flower power and slowly exposes the quiet, sodden evil that crept beneath all that peace and love – reminding us (and years of cipher-breaking Redditors) that not all killers will be caught.

Dir. David Fincher, 2007, 35mm, 157 min.

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Love Stories

b790b9fbb7af35750c3d655e0de5038a
2/11 - 11AM
$10/free for members and kids under 14

For this month’s sugar-packed, chocolate-covered, marshmallow-topped edition of Saturday Morning Cartoons, we’ve gathered all the tales of tenderness, great romances, and cartoon camaraderie we could cram into one show, honoring St. Valentine!

Complimentary cereal bar. Pajamas encouraged.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Feel My Pulse

feel_my_pulse_2_4
2/11 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Archival print courtesy of the Library of Congress

Featuring live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick

This madcap tale of hypochondria and bootlegging is the work of the then up-and-coming director Gregory La Cava, who was – naturally – a former cartoonist. When his employer tanked, he started making features replete with comic strip style stories. This one stars Bebe Daniels as a wildly over-protected child – on the cusp of adulthood, followed by a flock of nurses supplied at the request of her eccentric, late father. But as her 21st birthday nears, a cigar-chomping Texan uncle enters the picture and disrupts the germ-fearing charades. Our leading lady flees her home to a sanitarium she was set to inherit – but this place has its own band of loons – rum runners who have set up (a thinly veiled) bootlegging camp.

Dir. Gregory La Cava, 1928, 35mm, 63 min.

The feature will be preceded by Bumping into Broadway.

Dir. Hal Roach, 1919, 35mm, 25 min.

Night of the Living Dead Boys w/ Cheetah Chrome (Opening night party)

2/15 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

Night of the Living Dead Boys w/ Cheetah Chrome (Opening night party)

Night of the Living Dead Boys
2/15 - 7:30PM
$15/free for members

Join us for a program that features a LEGENDARY live concert by the Dead Boys at CBGBs in 1977, at the height of their power! This is American punk at its most raw, honest and urgent. Q&A to follow the screening, with Cheetah Chrome (of the Dead Boys and Rocket from the Tombs), Pat Ivers, and Emily Armstrong.

No Wave and Beyond

No Wave and Beyond
2/16 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

A compilation of live footage of Downtown NY’s most cutting edge artists – from Velvet Underground veteran John Cale on his Sabotage tour to rare footage of James Chance and the Contortions and Teenage Jesus and the Jerks at the Paradise Garage in 1978. No Wave superstars, DNA, avant garde jazz musicians Lounge Lizards, and Sun Ra round out a noise fest not for the meek. Followed by a Q&A with Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong.

Punk and New Wave

2/17 - 10:15PM
$14/free for members

California Split

CALIFORNIASPLIT_UNDER-TEXT2050
2/23 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Nobody captures the smoggy, smoked-out hangover that is Los Angeles better than Robert Altman did in the ‘70s. With his shaggy ambling muse Elliot Gould along for the ride, Altman mapped the sunburnt terrain with a bemused, amused accuracy that makes any L.A. stoner sigh with satisfaction. Gould and George Segal bounce wildly off one another in California Split – an exploration of compulsive gambling that ranks alongside Nashville and McCabe & Mrs. Miller as one of Altman’s finest works. Gould is the devil-may-care wild man, living on couches and a diet of cereal; Segal is a successful magazine publisher, the man with something to lose. Working with one of his most finely-tuned acting ensembles (including Bert Remsen, Gwen Welles and a very young Jeff Goldblum), Altman captures the sumptuously seedy side of the Southland without ever sacrificing the grace and dignity that these poor souls deserve. A feast of detail and subtle characterization, California Split is best experienced in the theater, where, like the gaming floor, you never really know what time of day it is.

Dir. Robert Altman, 1974, 35mm, 108 min.

Page 1 of 4412345...102030...Last »
http://www.seo.mavi1.org http://www.mavi1.org http://www.siyamiozkan.com.tr http://www.mavideniz1.org http://www.mavideniz.gen.tr http://www.17search17.com http://www.canakkaleruhu.org http://www.vergimevzuati.org http://www.finansaldenetci.com http://www.securityweb.org http://www.siyamiozkan.org http://www.fatmaozkan.com http://www.sgk.biz.tr http://www.denetci.gen.tr http://www.bagimsizdenetim.biz.tr http://www.mevzuat.biz.tr http://www.security.biz.tr http://www.sorgulatr.com http://www.kanunlar.biz http://www.prsorgu.net http://www.sirabul.com http://www.emekliol.org http://www.coklupagerank.com http://www.coklupagerank.net http://www.coklupagerank.org http://www.prsorgu.org http://www.scriptencode.com http://www.sirabul.net http://www.sirabul.org http://www.sitenizanaliz.com http://www.seoisko.com http://www.seomavi.com http://www.scriptencode.net http://www.scriptencode.org