Purple Noon

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9/27 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Greg Proops (one of the most mind-warpingly quick-draw improv comics on earth) records the latest episode of his monthly Film Club podcast live — and then it’s time for Purple Noon.

Greg sez: Purple Noon is the sexy French version of The Talented Mr. Ripley. Why so sexy? Well, mon ami, Alain Delon, (Le Samourai for Film Club Fans), hot teenage paratrooper in Vietnam and hoodlum supreme was launched into stardom by this picture. His Ripley is a feral id monster who kills people just so he can have nice things. Shot in postcard 1960 Rome and island paradise Ischia, the blue water of the Mediterranean is as warm as Ripley’s frosty green eyes and black soul are cold. This thriller leaves no doubt who the bad guy is; Delon’s unrelenting fervor for the perfect crime is what makes this one run wild. That and he is the sexiest cat you don’t want as your best friend. Come and get it Hollywood, you know you want it. Smoking outside. No knives allowed.

Dir. René Clément, 1960, 35mm, 118 min.

Belladonna of Sadness

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9/27 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

An American in Paris

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9/28 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Whether conducting a rudimentary English lesson for his arrondissements’ local school children or tidying up his microscopic attic apartment, Gene Kelly’s Jerry Mulligan leads a life so effortlessly infused with choreography, even his daydreams are set to song. Culminating in an elaborate, unprecedented, 17-minute dance number (price tag: nearly $5 million dollars in 2016), Vincente Minnelli’s An American in Paris also fashions the appropriate Siene-side stage for the on-screen debut of Leslie Caron (Gigi, Daddy Long Legs), who Kelly discovered in the Ballet des Champs Elysées and brought back stateside specifically for this picture. An immediately recognizable Gershwin songbook paired with the iconic set pieces of a classic Hollywood musical master and perfectly-integrated choreography from Kelly himself (not to mention the loveable sourpuss on Oscar Levant) make this a universally delightful watch, rich with the natural romanticism and swelling emotion of the City of Lights.

Dir. Vincente Minnelli, 1951, 35mm, 113 min.

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK: Gary Numan: Android in La La Land

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9/29 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Android In La La Land is a celebration of a British music-making pioneer and the love story that helped him turn his life around. At the end of the 1970s, Gary Numan found himself to be one of the world’s biggest-selling artists, “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?” and “Cars” were huge hits, no-one had heard, or seen, anyone like him.

Asperger’s syndrome helped forge Numan’s ambition, his music and image, but it brought problems. At a time when the public knew little about the condition, the press labeled him a freak, one paper suggested his parents should have been doctored for giving birth to him. Depression, near bankruptcy and a period in the wilderness followed. Then Numan fell in love with his biggest fan, and married her…

Dir. Steve Read & Rob Alexander, 2016, DCP, 85 min.

Watch the trailer!

King of New York (rare 35mm print!)

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9/30 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Live Set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Despite playing a snake of man, Christopher Walken delivers an unforgettable performance, with boatloads of charisma, as a Robin Hood of sorts who uses his drug kingpin money to pay for a downtrodden hospital in the south Bronx in Abel Ferrara’s overlooked 1990 gem. With “Rembrandted out” cinematography (Ferrara’s words), an exceptional screenplay from Nicholas St. John (Ms. 45, Body Snatchers), and singularly idiosyncratic performances from David Caruso, Larry Fishburne, Steve Buscemi, and Victor Argo as the film’s lone moral compass, King of New York is a manic, unpredictable beast of American exploitation cinema. Come melt your brain with this rare 35mm screening chock-full of absurdities and Ferrara staples–a briefcase full of tampons, twisted and perverse catholicism, and a drive-by cop shooting at a police funeral–so extreme that Ferrara’s own wife walked out of the premiere.

Dir. Abel Ferrara, 1990, 35mm (Courtesy of Park Circus UK), 103 min.

Belladonna of Sadness

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9/30 - 10PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Poltergeist III

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9/30 - 11:59PM
$12/free for members

CAROL ANNE! In horror franchises, the third entry is typically where things get gloriously crazy, and thankfully Gary Sherman’s Poltergeist III is no exception. Transporting the saga of the ghost-beleaguered Freeling family (minus all but one original Freeling) from the suburbs to a Trump Tower-inspired Chicago high rise, Sherman’s 1988 sequel chronicles Carol Anne’s (Heather O’Rourke in her final role) continuing battle with the specter Reverend Kane and his jolly band of evil spirits. Poor Carol Anne only has her distracted millionaire uncle (Tom Skerritt), his kid-unfriendly wife (Nancy Allen) and their boy-crazy teen daughter (Laura Flynn Boyle) to help her fend off the titular poltergeists, who spend a lot of their time voguing in the reflections of mirrors, windows, puddles…you name it. It’s a beautiful clusterfuck of dizzying nonsense that may not live up to the heights of the Spielberg-shepherded original, but is still a hell of a lot of campy ’80s fun and a great kickoff to the Halloween season. Plus, you get to hear the name CAROL ANNE yelled at least 60 times in one sitting, so it’s a win-win.

Dir. Gary Sherman, 1988, 35mm, 98 min.

Essene

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10/1 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Named after the ascetic community purported to have scribed the Dead Sea Scrolls, Essene finds Wiseman immersed in a Benedictine monastery in rural Michigan, whose members struggle to reconcile their individual idiosyncrasies with the community’s collective needs. He films the brethren in prayer, at study, holding mass, and maintaining the grounds, granted access even to private counseling sessions. In a departure from earlier works, he returns to a few subjects, allowing them to become characters in their own right, including one monk on the brink of a nervous breakdown. Wiseman’s presence is all but invisible here, including one virtuosic 360-degree handheld shot around the abbot in the middle of a mass service.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1972, 16mm, 86 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

King of New York (rare 35mm print + editor Anthony Redman in person!)

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10/1 - 7:15PM
$12/free for members

Despite playing a snake of man, Christopher Walken delivers an unforgettable performance, with boatloads of charisma, as a Robin Hood of sorts who uses his drug kingpin money to pay for a downtrodden hospital in the south Bronx in Abel Ferrara’s overlooked 1990 gem. With “Rembrandted out” cinematography (Ferrara’s words), an exceptional screenplay from Nicholas St. John (Ms. 45, Body Snatchers), and singularly idiosyncratic performances from David Caruso, Larry Fishburne, Steve Buscemi, and Victor Argo as the film’s lone moral compass, King of New York is a manic, unpredictable beast of American exploitation cinema. Come melt your brain with this rare 35mm screening chock-full of absurdities and Ferrara staples–a briefcase full of tampons, twisted and perverse catholicism, and a drive-by cop shooting at a police funeral–so extreme that Ferrara’s own wife walked out of the premiere.

Dir. Abel Ferrara, 1990, 35mm (Courtesy of Park Circus UK), 103 min.

Belladonna of Sadness

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10/1 - 9:45PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Cinelicious & SpectreVision

One of the great lost masterpieces of Japanese animation, never before officially released in the U.S., Belladonna of Sadness is a mad, swirling, psychedelic light-show of medieval tarot-card imagery with horned demons, haunted forests and La Belle Dame Sans Merci, equal parts J.R.R. Tolkien and gorgeous, explicit Gustav Klimt-influenced eroticism. The last film in the adult-themed Animerama trilogy produced by the godfather of Japanese anime & manga, Osamu Tezuka and directed by his long time collaborator Eiichi Yamamoto (Astro Boy and Kimba The White Lion), Belladonna unfolds as a series of spectacular still watercolor paintings that bleed and twist together. An innocent young woman, Jeanne (voiced by Aiko Nagayama) is violently raped by the local lord on her wedding night. To take revenge, she makes a pact with the Devil himself (voiced by Tatsuya Nakadai, from Akira Kurosawa’s Ran) who appears as an erotic sprite and transforms her into a black-robed vision of madness and desire.

Extremely transgressive, Belladonna is fueled by a mind-blowing Japanese psych rock soundtrack by noted avant-garde jazz composer Masahiko Satoh. The film has been newly restored by Cinelicious Pics using the original 35mm camera negative and sound elements – and including over 8 minutes of surreal and explicit footage cut from the negative. On par with Rene Laloux’s Fantastic Planet and Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards as an LSD-stoked 1970s head trip, Belladonna marks a major rediscovery for animation fans. If Led Zeppelin had a favorite film, this would be it. In other words, Stairway to Hell. (Dennis Bartok, Cinelicious)

Dir. Eiichi Yamamoto, 1973, DCP Restoration, 93 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

Cat People

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10/2 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Hangover Matinees and Friday Night Frights

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

In a 1940s Hollywood deeply beholden to a strictly-enforced Hays Code, RKO somehow thought it safe to approach a script in which an exotic, sensual woman’s every carnal desire manifests as a literal animal–one with killer instincts. Filed close to the Invasion of the Body Snatchers end of your local video store’s “Noir” section, Jacques Tourneur’s Cat People teases with subverted sexuality and allusions to potential danger without ever quite tipping into glorified obscenity; there’s the spirit of an exploitation film hidden somewhere within Irena’s (played with prowling prowess by the gorgeous Simone Simon) deep fear of her own corporeal power. Even with suppressed erotic notions, Cat People exists as a thoughtful inquiry into how a proper woman “ought to” sexually express herself. With harsh shadows and dramatic lighting somehow executed for under $150,000, Tourneur’s dangerous, slightly sleazy horror-noir still titillates and terrifies over 70 years later.

Dir. Jacques Tourneur, 1942, 16mm, 73 min.

The Academy of Muses

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10/2 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Acropolis Cinema

Spanish filmmaker José Luis Guerín’s first narrative feature since the beloved In the City of Sylvia is a work of both immaculate refinement and deceptive ambition. Centered on a married, middle-aged philosophy professor (Raffaele Pinto) who uses his theories on creativity and the role of the muse to intellectually seduce his female students, the film furthers Guerín’s interest in the psychology underpinning the male-female dynamic, constructing a reflexive framework through which to interrogate the very process of artistic inspiration. Set in the world of academia yet bereft of the monotony suggested by such a setting, the film unfolds in the guise of nonfiction before flowering into a moral tale of literary expanse. Beautifully composed and intimately pitched, The Academy of Muses brings art and life into unique dialogue, stimulating the senses as readily as it prompts reflection.

Dir. José Luis Guerín, 2015, DCP, 92 min.

Watch the trailer!

"Fellini Satyricon" Food Orgy! (Off-site at Barnsdall Art Park)

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10/2 - 5:30PM
$25

Join us for a late-summer Satyricon style feast before the film, en plein air!

Ticket price includes a wine tasting before the screening, which begins at sundown.

NOTE: This event is 21+. Parking is free, but limited. Rideshare and carpool strongly encouraged! Bring a blanket, bring a pillow, but please, no lawn furniture. Bring a picnic, but no outside alcohol will be permitted.

Even after the orgiastic stylings of his Juliet of the Spirits and “Toby Damnit” segment from Spirits of the Dead, no one was prepared when Fellini unleashed this bizarre, druggy adaptation of the ancient (and incomplete) Petronius classic. In first-century Rome, two attractive students (Martin Potter and Hiram Keller) fight it out over a young boy, which sets them all off on a series of bizarre adventures involving hermaphrodites, impotence potions, dwarfs, and opulent costumes and sets from such greats as Dante Ferretti and Danilo Donati, all shot in gorgeous Cinemascope. The obvious inspiration for Caligula, it remains the wildest Roman spectacle of them all and cheerfully revels in the fact that it makes no damn sense, right up to the cliffhanger final scene. Many critics hated this when it opened, but it’s now rightfully regarded as a classic. And look fast for a very early, chubby role by hairy fitness guru Richard Simmons!

Dir. Federico Fellini, 1969, digital presentation, 128 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

King of New York (rare 35mm print!)

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10/2 - 10:30PM
$12/free for members

Despite playing a snake of man, Christopher Walken delivers an unforgettable performance, with boatloads of charisma, as a Robin Hood of sorts who uses his drug kingpin money to pay for a downtrodden hospital in the south Bronx in Abel Ferrara’s overlooked 1990 gem. With “Rembrandted out” cinematography (Ferrara’s words), an exceptional screenplay from Nicholas St. John (Ms. 45, Body Snatchers), and singularly idiosyncratic performances from David Caruso, Larry Fishburne, Steve Buscemi, and Victor Argo as the film’s lone moral compass, King of New York is a manic, unpredictable beast of American exploitation cinema. Come melt your brain with this rare 35mm screening chock-full of absurdities and Ferrara staples–a briefcase full of tampons, twisted and perverse catholicism, and a drive-by cop shooting at a police funeral–so extreme that Ferrara’s own wife walked out of the premiere.

Dir. Abel Ferrara, 1990, 35mm (Courtesy of Park Circus UK), 103 min.

Mean Girls

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10/3 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.

Dir. Mark Waters, 2004, 35mm, 97 min.

Freaks (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

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10/4 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

“Freaks” are good-hearted and loyal, “normals” are the ones to watch out for. This is the moral of Tod Browning’s infamous 1932 circus horror progenitor Freaks, an eerily convincing and underappreciated exploitation flick. Coming right off the huge success of Dracula, Browning was given buckets of freedom with Freaks, but the world couldn’t handle looking directly at what they feared; the picture was pulled despite heavy edits (many of the most “extreme” moments of terror were lost), and Browning’s career never fully recovered. Join us for a rare 16mm presentation of this banned classic of horror cinema! “We accept you, we accept you, one of us, one of us!”

Dir. Tod Browning, 1932, 16mm, 64 min.

LOST & FOUND FILM CLUB: VIDEONS: An Evening with Steve Beck

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10/5 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Electronic “polymediast” Steve Beck has been sculpting video and multimedia works with electrons since the pre-digital era in 1967, and tonight, he’ll present an eye-popping overview of his most incredible visual innovations. Join us as we take a trip from the analog age into early computers, the video game era, and beyond! Beck started out working light shows for the likes of Jimi Hendrix, and found a home in Northern CA’s vibrant 70′s experimental film scene, where he channeled the spirit of fellow luminaries Jordan Belson and John Whitney to develop his own revolutionary direct video synthesizer. His resulting Videons™ incorporated music, live performance, poetic imagery, and computer technology to form a hybrid of sound and image he dubbed “illuminated music.” For this rare screening event, we’ll see pioneering digital video weavings, visual jazz from the first-ever live televised video synth broadcast, a break dancing animation created on an Apple II, and best of all, we’ll meet a true pioneer of the moving image, as Steve Beck joins us in person for a Q&A!

Visit Steve Beck’s Website

This Lost & Found program is a special digital presentation, sourced from original video masters. Bonus 16mm shorts TBA! Images above © Stephen “Steve” Beck.

Watch the original trailer! Videon clips © 1972-2016 by Steve Beck.

Artist’s Note: This show is dedicated to my mother, Mrs. Lorraine L. Mandarino Beck, in honor of her 89th birthday.

The Greasy Strangler

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10/7 - 11PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

THE SILENT TREATMENT: The Last Warning

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10/8 - 2PM
$12/free for members

feat. live accompaniment by Cliff Retallick
and special introductory remarks from Mike Feinberg, Film Preservation Manager at Universal

Too oft dismissed as a rehash of Paul Leni’s (The Man Who Laughs) own film, The Cat and the Canary, The Last Warning is a unique entry in the Universal horror canon, especially in its setting–the heart of Broadway at the peak of theatre season. Brought to exuberant life by Hal Mohr’s cinematography (never ceasing to swoop, shift and explore perspectives) and Leni’s German Expressionist roots and clear parallels to Louis Feuillade’s work, The Last Warning has no real basis in reality–“just reflecting layers of make-believe” (Michael Atkinson).

Dir. Paul Leni, 1929, DCP restoration, 89 min.

Juvenile Court

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10/8 - 4PM
$12/free for members

An attentive and non-judgemental look at the youth courts system in Memphis, Juvenile Court showcases Wiseman’s inimitable observational abilities. Dealing with cases concerning everything from armed robbery and sexual assault to drug addiction, abuse, and foster care, Wiseman approaches each moment with his trademark respect for his chosen subject. Imbued with remarkably instinctual cinematography, rife with poignant imagery–a piece of tissue sticking to a young girl’s eye as she attempts to wipe the tears away, a badly burned young boy’s pained whisper as he tries to answer sensitive questions–and expertly crafted, Juvenile Court is a captivating document of the devastatingly human turmoil and confusion that finds its home in the supposedly ordered courtroom.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1973, 16mm, 144 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Greasy Strangler

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10/8 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

O.J.: Made in America (w/ director Ezra Edelman in person!)

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10/9 - 12PM
Free (first-come, first-served)

It is the defining cultural tale of modern America–a saga of race, celebrity, media, violence, and the criminal justice system. And two decades after its unforgettable climax, it continues to fascinate, polarize, and even, yes, develop new chapters. Now, the producers of ESPN’s award-winning 30 for 30 have made it the subject of their most ambitious project yet. From Peabody and Emmy-award winning director Ezra Edelman, O.J.: Made in America revisits—and redefines—it all. The domestic abuse. The police investigation. The white Bronco chase. The trial of the century. The motive, the blood, the glove. The verdict. The aftermath.

Drawing upon more than seventy interviews—from longtime friends and colleagues of Simpson to the recognizable protagonists of the murder investigation to observers and commentators with distinct connections to the story—the documentary is an engrossing, compelling, and unforgettable look at a tantalizing saga. Because at the end of what seems like a search for the real truth about O.J. Simpson, what’s revealed just as powerfully is a collection of indelible, unshakeable, and haunting truths about America, and about ourselves.

Join us as we watch all 7+ hours of this documentary, with two intermissions and a Q&A with filmmaker Ezra Edelman to follow.

Dir. Ezra Edelman, 2016, digital presentation, 464 min.

Complimentary valet parking available.

NOTE: To help us track attendance, you must pre-register for “first-come, first-serve” admission. Your registration does not guarantee you a seat.

Cinefamily is a non-profit. All of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members get priority entry to our free shows. Donating for a Cinefamily membership is the perfect way to both support the theater, and to gain access to the early-entry line.

The Greasy Strangler

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10/9 - 10PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Greasy Strangler

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10/10 - 5PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Greasy Strangler

greasy1_480_309
10/11 - 5PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

Something Wicked This Way Comes (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

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10/11 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Exactly when did Dark’s Pandemonium Carnival come to town? The inimitable literary master Ray Bradbury’s screen adaptation of his darkly fantastical 1962 novel conjures a crisp afternoon in late October, a month that, this particular year, heralds an unanticipated wind, electrically charged with whispers of mysterious music and wafts of intoxicating perfume signaling the arrival of Jonathan Pryce’s zooty, sinister “Mr. Dark,” ushering in Halloween one week early .

A product of the strange decade between 1975 and 1985–when Disney still had the gall to shake us out of our cutesy, animated stupor and scare the living crap out of us–Something Wicked This Way Comes boasts unexpected turns from both Diane Ladd and Pam Grier, a sweeping score from Titanic composer James Horner, and a backwards carousel and mirrored funhouse that turn innocent, youthful wishes into the stuff of pure nightmares.

Dir. Jack Clayton, 1983, 16mm, 93 min.

The Greasy Strangler

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10/12 - 5PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

The Greasy Strangler

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10/13 - 5PM
$12/free for members

When Big Ronnie and his son Brayden meet lone female tourist Janet on Big Ronnie’s Disco Walking Tour—the best and only disco walking tour in the city—a fight for Janet’s heart erupts between father and son, and the infamous Greasy Strangler is unleashed. With singularity of vision that could only exist in a post-Tim-and-Eric mediascape, first-time filmmaker Jim Hosking has concocted a complete and contained, triumphantly grotesque, idiosyncratic cinematic universe all his own. Proving there is indeed space on this planet for the endangered species that is the Trash Auteur, Hosking’s reverence for repetition, especially of the drippingly raunchy variety, doesn’t allow you a single moment to gaze away from the absurdity that is this sick, nihilistic, and oddly sweet, little world.

Dir. Jim Hosking, 2016, DCP, 93 min.

Watch the trailer!

Saturday Morning Cartoons: Dreams and Nightmares

OozeMosters
10/15 - 11AM
$10/free for members and kids under 14

It’s the most wonderful time of the year at Cinefamily, when ghouls and goblins get up in the guts of our favorite cartoon worlds! Prepare to treat yourself to a tricked out Saturday morning at our annual spooky and scary cartoon cavalcade of creepy. We’ll venture from the realm of nightmares to the haze and marvel of dreamscapes, alongside our favorite animated amigos; join us in watching Mickey Mouse, Finn the Human, Popeye the Sailor, and many more face their dark dreams in honor of our favorite holiday.

Pajamas not mandatory, but encouraged. Special Halloween treats await, so come armed with a sweet tooth!

Primate

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10/15 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Wiseman’s visit to the Yerkes National Primate Research Center is a meticulous study of the processes used to test and document the behavior of various apes, including orangutans, chimps, and gorillas. Equal parts interspecies anthropological study and a slow-cooking horror-show, you’re just as likely to smile at nurses giving baby chimps little milk bottles and changing their diapers as you are to gasp at the harvesting of a gibbon’s brain. Wiseman balances long takes of surgery and observation with quick close-ups of the various instruments and machines used, representing increasingly experimental (think mad-scientist) procedures in excruciating detail, without sacrificing the sense of elapsed time.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1974, 16mm, 105 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Innocents

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10/16 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Hangover Matinees and Friday Night Frights

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

A Freudian, intensified adaptation of Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw–co-written by Truman Capote–Jack Clayton’s The Innocents is a genuinely terrifying meditation on repressed sexuality and the inevitability of children’s loss of innocence as adulthood begins to creep in, taken to its extreme in the form of possession. Directed with elegance, nuance (rare for a film in the “evil child” canon), and a remarkable handle of atmosphere, mood and setting, The Innocents pushes everything so far that its final scene resulted in an X-rating upon release in 1961.

Dir. Jack Clayton, 1961, DCP, 100 min.

Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (w/ Apichatpong Weerasethakul in person!)

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10/17 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This program is co-presented by the CalArts School of Film/Video, Film at REDCAT and Los Angeles Filmforum with support from Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

As the titular and ailing Uncle Boonmee anticipates his own death, he is launched into a meandering exploration of spiritualism and reincarnation, manifest in nighttime visits from spirits on his veranda. Richly rendered in a meditative, deep, dark nighttime infused with Weerasethakul’s trademark elements of fantasy, the film is as subdued as it is magical. At once an intimate familial tale and a ghost story, Uncle Boonmee stages encounters with a magnificent Bigfoot like creature (Boonmee’s long lost son), talking animals, a princess, and more, in a deluge of bizarre quiet moments. But despite it’s loose relationship to reality, the film is a tender and genuine one; as much as it eludes, it delights, with an expected—and welcome—matter of factness and humor.

Dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2010, 35mm, 114 min.

Santa Sangre (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

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10/18 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Alejandro Jodorowsky is no stranger to surrealism, sadomasochism, and the dark side of codependency, but never have they all come together in such a striking way as his 1989 avant garde-psych-horror extravaganza Santa Sangre. Largely concerned with exploring a manipulative, fetishistic, and perverse relationship between mother and son, Santa Sangre is a macabre, darkly funny, and shockingly beautiful tale of a boy growing up in the circus, trying to make sense of the Jungian archetypes embedded in the increasingly solipsistic behaviors of the supposed adults surrounding him. Exploding with cavalcades of colors and Fellini-esque characters, Santa Sangre is quite possibly Jodorowsky’s greatest achievement, bringing his admiration for Buñuel’s Mexican films and his gigantic heart together, via the seemingly perfect vehicle of the circus.

Dir. Alejandro Jodorowsky, 1989, Digital Presentation, 123 min.

Cemetery of Splendour (w/ Apichatpong Weerasethakul in person!)

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10/19 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

This program is co-presented by the CalArts School of Film/Video, Film at REDCAT and Los Angeles Filmforum with support from Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts.

A waking dream set in Khon Kaen, the lush stomping grounds of director Apichatpong Weerasethakul childhood, Cemetery of Splendour is a subtle fantasy focused on a group of former soldiers stricken by a debilitating “sleeping sickness” and housed in a clinic that rests atop a rumored burial ground for past kings of Thailand. Despite its urgent and quietly devastating nature, the soliders’ narcolepsy-esque disorder never seems quite clinical; the dream lives of the patients are of the utmost importance to their caretakers, managed by the glow of colored light therapy lamps. A crippled woman named Jenjira (long time Weerasethakul collaborator Jenjira Pongpas Widner) and a medium who acts as an envoy between the slumbering men and their family members, emerge as the most significant of these caretakers, forming a strong and uniquely communicative bond with one of the men. A crystalline and meditative work of slow cinema, punctuated by the luminescence of the lamps in cool blue and blood red, Cemetery of Splendour delicately toes the line between a cinema of quiet intimacy and broader political allegory—with the haunting and touching image of the silenced men laid out above the bodies of silenced Kings.

Dir. Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2015, DCP, 122 min.

Major!

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10/20 - 7PM
$12

Q&A with Dirs. Annalise Ophelian and StormMiguel Florez

Major! explores the life and campaigns of Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, a formerly
incarcerated Black transgender elder and activist who has been fighting for the rights of trans women of color for over 40 years. Miss Major is a veteran of the Stonewall Rebellion and a survivor of Attica State Prison, a former sex worker, an elder, and a community leader and human rights activist. She is simply “Mama” to many in her community. Her personal story and activism for transgender civil rights intersects LGBT struggles for justice and equality from the 1960s to today. At the center of her activism is her fierce advocacy for her girls, trans women of color who have survived police brutality and incarceration in men’s jails and prisons.

Major! is more than just a biographical documentary: It’s an investigation into
critical issues of how the Prison Industrial Complex represents a widespread and systematic civil rights violation, as well as a historical portrait of diverse LGBT communities, told with love and humor, and personalized through the lens of a vibrant and charismatic woman. Through first-person narration and innovative visual storytelling, Major! seeks to create a living, breathing history of a community’s struggle and resilience, as seen and experienced by those who lived it.

Dirs. Annalise Ophelian and StormMiguel Florez, 2015, DCP, 85 min.

Watch the trailer! YouTube Preview Image

Special Shorts Program I (curated by Zackary Drucker)

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10/20 - 9:30PM
$12

Feat. new shorts and a tribute to Greer Lankton (w/ special guests Dirs. Hanna Ladoul and Marco La Via, Dir Juan Carlos Zaldivar, Paul Monroe and more!)

Alterations
Dir. Juan Carlos Zaldivar, 2016, Digital Presentation, 19 min.

Soless (Q&A w/ Dir. Carman Spoto!)
Dir. Carman Spoto, 2016, DCP, 7 min.

Diane from the Moon (Los Angeles premiere + Q&A w/ Dirs. Hanna Ladoul & Marco La Via!)
Dir. Marco La Via & Hanna Ladoul, 2016, 11 min.

The Contortionist by Greer Lankton (introduction by Zackary Drucker + Special guest Paul Monroe (Lankton’s husband and archivist)

In the early 1980s, when New York City’s East Village was teeming with the likes of Nan Goldin, Iggy Pop, and Cinema of Transgression founder Nick Zedd, artist Greer Lankton was making her dolls. Born Greg Lankton in a late-1950s midwestern United States, her obsession with high fashion and the Golden Age of Hollywood propelled not just her own evolving identity expression, but also the fantastical realism and somewhat bleak bohemia that would become the hallmark imbued in each of her uncannily sculpted figurines. Sometimes life-size, other times miniature in stature and intermittently dismembered, Lankton’s ambisexual creatures evoke reactions that swing on a hinge somewhere between rejection and desire, holding up a mirror not just to her artist friends and muses but to her inner conflict of self-representation. Honored through an excavation of Lankton’s unique “grammar of representation,” the night will include interview footage from the 1995 Whitney Biennial and her solo Mattress Factory exhibition, It’s All About ME, Not You, and other rare moments of the late artist on film.

Female Trouble

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10/20 - MIDNITE
$12

“I’d like to introduce the most beautiful woman in the world: the fabulous Dawn
Davenport.”

Reeling from the cult success of Pink Flamingos, trash hounds everywhere wondered how the future “King of Bad Taste” would follow up on his previous doses of celluloid ipecac. What does one do when they’ve already pushed the limits of filth to the Nth degree? In John Waters’ case, he takes it to O with this mascara-stained, good-girl-gone bad B-movie sendup/crime epic Female Trouble. Dawn Davenport (played by the paramountly influential Divine) ascends from humble beginnings as a petty, cha-cha heel-less swindler to a criminal whose cult of personality becomes equal to (then) contemporaries such as Manson, Tex Watson, or Richard Speck. Waters’ distorts the boundaries of crime and beauty to be spoken in the same “bad” breath, with the usual cast of Dreamlanders (Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce, Edith Massey, David Lochary), definitive set design from Waters’ long time collaborator Vincent Peranio, and one of the best theme songs of all time. Rat your hair, inject some liquid mascara, and put on your cha-cha heels for this under-appreciated Waters’ classic.

Dir. John Waters, 1974, 35mm, 89 min.

Special Industry Panel w/ Geena Rocero (pending availability and Allison Hoffman of Gender Proud Productions

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10/21 - 3PM
Free (first come, first served)

Geena Rocero (pending availability) and Allison Hoffman in conversation with Zackary Drucker

Geena Rocero and Allison Hoffman are founders of Gender Proud Productions, a new kind of production company: trans-focused and trans-specific, with a goal to use media to elevate justice and equality for the transgender community. Since its founding in 2014, content produced by Gender Proud has been viewed over 5 million times and garnered tens of millions of impressions. In conversation with Zackary Drucker, Rocero and Hoffman focus on what it means to start and run a successful trans-specific production company, and what it means to produce and sell trans-focused content to producers and find an audience. Filmmakers, talent, and the general public are encouraged to attend.

In order to attend the screening, you must RSVP here. Your RSVPs will helps us gauge attendance. You will receive an RSVP confirmation email 48 hrs prior to the event.

La Visita

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10/21 - 5PM
$12

A Bergman-esque masterwork of familial drama, Mauricio López Fernández’s La Visita presents an eerily calm, civil look at what happens to a conservative Chilean family when their prodigal son returns as a woman, for her father’s funeral. Anchored by an unshakable performance from Daniela Vega as the wayward child, and imbued with the patience, understanding, maturity and most importantly, comedic instincts, of familial drama-obsessed filmmakers such as Arnaud Desplechin and Aki Kaurismäki, La Visita feels far more like the work of a seasoned filmmaker than a debut.

Dir. Mauricio López Fernández, 2014, DCP, 82 min.

Special Shorts Program II (curated by Zackary Drucker)

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10/21 - 7:30PM
$12

w/ special guests Silas Howard, Jen Richards, Giselle Messina, Mia Yamamoto, Rain Valdez and more!

More than T (Sneak Preview!)
Dir. Silas Howard, 2016, 23 min.

Elliot King Is Third
Dir. Rose Troche, 2013, 20 min.

Technical Difficulties of Intimacy (LA premiere w/ Buck Angel in person!)
Dir. Joel Moffett, 2015, 20 min.

Ryans
Dir. Rain Valdez, 2016, Digital Presentation, 14 min.

The Queen + Queens at Heart

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10/21 - 9:15PM
$14

Also featuring This Is Me: “Generation”

w/ Flawless Sabrina, star of The Queen in person!

The drag queens of the Miss All-American Camp Beauty Pageant in NYC burst off the screen in this quintessential 1967 documentary. The spark that would lead to Paris Is Burning, The Queen is a tragically underseen, rare, and vital piece of the story of drag in America. Beyond documenting the pageant, the film transports us backstage, where the contestants dive into conversations on sexual identity, draft boards, sex change operations, and more–culminating with one contestant’s outburst in response to the racism within the drag scene. With judges including Andy Warhol, Edie Sedgwick, and Jackie Curtis, we dare you to resist this film, these queens, and a delectable slice of late 60s drag panoply–on a rare 35mm print!

Dir. Frank Simon, 1968, 35mm, 68 min.

A rare archival short, Queens at Heart follows four shockingly courageous pre-Stonewall trans women, Misty, Vicky, Sonja, and Simone. They go out as women at night, but live as men during the day, take hormones, and dream of “going for a change.” Subjected to a six-month psychological project, and cross-examined by dubious “experts” all four women are incredibly captivating subjects–whether being interrogated or partying at the ball.
-Jenni Olson

Dir, 1967, 35mm, 22 min.

Queens at Heart 35mm restored print courtesy of the UCLA Film & Television Archive. Restoration funding provided by the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project.

Something Must Break

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10/21 - 11:59PM
$12

A thirst-quenching-ly fresh take on youthful restlessness and transgressive romance and a notable entry in the burgeoning canon of transgender cinema, transgender filmmaker Ester Martin Bergsmark’s (She Male Snails) Something Must Break is an assured, artful meditation, stunningly lensed and steeped in morphing ideals of gender fluidity. With a trance/dance-inducing soundtrack by Tami Tamaki and Olof Dreijer (of The Knife), starring performance artist Iggy Malmborg and Saga Becker in a shockingly candid performance as protagonist Sebastian/Ellie—Something manages to be aggressively punk in attitude, transgressive in execution, while wearing its heart firmly on its sleeve with lines like, “You’re so beautiful I want to vomit.”

Dir. Ester Martin Bergsmark, 2014, DCP, 85 min.

Welfare

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10/22 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Welfare sees Frederick Wiseman’s steadfast gaze focus in on the operations of a single Manhattan government assistance office, right in the thick of the notoriously hard times that characterized New York City in the 1970s. When the needy (many desperately so) who line up in the early hours of the morning finally get a chance to speak with a government worker, a seemingly infinite maze of regulations comes into focus. Wiseman’s camera situates itself at the interface point between the office’s employees and visitors, attending to painfully drawn-out conversations that attempt to translate basic needs into line items–a Sisyphean task that often seems to reach no resolutions–as both parties become more deeply mired in the system’s bureaucracy.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1975, 16mm, 167 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

In a Year with 13 Moons

IN EINEM JAHR MIT 13 MONDEN / IN A YEAR WITH 13 MOONS
10/23 - 4:15PM
$12/free for members

35mm print courtesy of the TIFF Film Reference Library

Fassbinder’s second best film (by his own estimation), In a Year With 13 Moons tells the story of a few days in the life of Elvira, a trans woman–formerly Erwin–and her dealings with the past as she comes to terms with her present. Drawing heavily from Hans Christian Andersen’s 1836 The Little Mermaid, Goethe’s Torquato Tasso, and Schopenhauer’s affirmational musings on suicide, 13 Moons is one of the greatest achievements of his absurdly prolific, all-too-short career. Though known for taking on many jobs on his film sets, this film is the only one for which Fassbinder served as director, editor, producer, writer and set designer–making this arguably the closest to pure, uncut Fassbinder the world was ever given. Dark and honest, In A Year with 13 Moons remains a universally relatable, melancholic lament for human closeness, and that elusive thing called love.

Dir. Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1978, 35mm, 124 min.

FREE Cece!

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10/23 - 7PM
$12/free for members

Q&A with director Jacqueline Gares

Free CeCe! follows CeCe McDonald, a transgender woman of color who was imprisoned after surviving a racist and transphobic attack in Minneapolis in 2011. Exploring her incarceration, eventual release, and life after imprisonment–as an activist and prison abolitionist–Jacqueline Gares and Laverne Cox’s hugely significant film is one of indomitable spirit; boldly confrontational in the face of systematic injustice. -Laura Nicholson

Dir. Jacqueline Gares, 2016, DCP, 100 min.

Holly Woodlawn Tribute presented by Zackary Drucker

Warhol Star Holly Woodlawn
10/23 - 9:30PM
$12/free for members

With very special guests!

Before being famously canonized in Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” and Paul Morrissey’s Trash and Women in Revolt, Puerto Rican superstar Holly Woodlawn hitchhiked in her high heels from the Miami she’d always called home to an early-’60s New York City, where she subsequently fell in with Warhol’s Factory crowd, dabbled with substance abuse and petty public crimes, and emerged a singular figure, worthy of legend. Before her death in late 2015, Woodlawn had appeared in over two dozen films, firmly cementing herself as a vocal, visible figure within and for the active queer communities on both coasts. A specially curated Cinefamily original mix tape of film appearances, talk show moments and candid interview segments, along with additional Woodlawn wonders, will narrate the life of a trans legend too-soon gone from the glittering, fabulous screen.

Wildness

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10/23 - 11:44PM
$12/free for members

With special guests TBA

Also screening This Is Me: “Bathrooms”

A disembodied voice beckons us deep into the rich history of the Silver Platter,
Los Angeles’s longest-standing gay bar, the lifeblood–and a lifeline–for the mostly Latino LGBT community of MacArthur Park. Club regulars address their warm sense of family alongside the continued plight of undocumented workers, alluding to the activism sometimes necessary to maintain the safety of an oft-maligned community. When a younger generation, their interest piqued by the club’s decades of history, wild energy and spirit, moves in on the sacred grounds of the pioneers of Latino queer nightlife, will the vanguard embrace the changes inherent in an exuberant new wave, with their countercultural performance art and new perspectives? Can a scrappy crew of art kids truly create a reinvigorated, safe space for both the young and the old? The Silver Platter suggests there’s room within her walls for everyone.

Dir. Wu Tsang, 2012, Digital Presentation, 73 min.

THE DOUG BENSON MOVIE INTERRUPTION: The Conjuring 2

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10/24 - 7:30PM
$14/free for members

The next installment of Doug Benson’s Movie Interruption, where Doug and his friends (who, in the past, have included everyone from Jon Hamm to Sarah Silverman and Zach Galifianakis) chill on the front row couches, mics in hand, and say whatever hilarious thing pops into their heads while a movie of their choosing unfolds on the screen.

Dir. James Wan, 2016, DCP, 134 min.

Vampire Circus + Circus of Horrors Mixtape (Off-site at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

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10/25 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

preceded by a Cinefamily original Circus of Horrors mixtape

Description coming soon…

Dir. Robert Young, 1972, Digital Presentation, 87 min.

The Bride of Frankenstein

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10/26 - 7:30PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Hangover Matinees and Friday Night Frights

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Not only is James Whale’s 1935 The Bride of Frankenstein one of the first horror sequels, but it is the first sequel to arguably surpass the quality and esteem of its genre-defining (and also Whale-directed) predecessor. Really the second half of Mary Shelley’s seminal Gothic horror novel, Whale’s film departs from the original text significantly, including the addition of one of cinema’s first not-so-thinly veiled homosexual characters in the guise of the wicked and brilliant Dr. Pretorious (Ernest Thesiger). Boris Karloff is back in the neck bolts, aided by the ever-beguiling Elsa Lancaster as the titular, shock-haired bride–also an icon of movie monsterdom–but the real star of the show is Whale’s wit and playfulness with what would normally be a standard cobwebs and crypts affair. From the sets to the score to the side characters, Bride of Frankenstein chills and delights nearly a century after its release; a must-see for Halloween–or any season, for that matter.

Dir. James Whale, 1935, 35mm, 75 min.

Horror House on Highway Five (w/ filmmaker Richard Casey in person!)

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10/26 - 10:30PM
$10/free for members

Restoration courtesy of Vinegar Syndrome

While researching an ex-Nazi scientist who built V-2 rockets out in the desert, a group of students are targeted by a serial killer sporting a Richard Nixon mask. We’re still trying to unpack the symbolism here… but it’s not for a lack of a good time. With bugs, drugs, sex, freaks, fascism, rocket science, black magic and murder, what more do you need? Basically, this trash horror treasure shows Tricky Dick doing to puerile coeds what he did to trust in America’s highest office. Let’s put it this way: no matter what, you’ll enjoy more 80’s slasher, bleeding skull WTF-ness than you can shake a swastika at.

Dir. Richard Casey, 1985, DCP restoration, 87 min.

Meat

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10/29 - 4PM
$12/free for members

Much like his earlier High School, Frederick Wiseman’s Meat is essentially concerned with the dehumanizing forces within certain North American institutions. On the surface, Meat is simply its title, but digging a bit deeper reveals a film concerned with the death of the Old West and a look at the myth of masculinity’s role in the workplace, punctuated by quiet moments of reprieve tinged in surrealism and brutality, like a goat leading a flock of sheep to their demise or a circle of steer heads on a line of hooks. Going predictably full-circle, Meat follows the industrial production from livestock to grocery store, the business side of meat manufacturing, and workers’ struggles and budget concerns. With inevitably stomach-turning footage of the process of transforming an animal from a living thing into a product, Wiseman locks his gaze on the simultaneously visceral and exhaustive process.

Dir. Frederick Wiseman, 1976, 16mm, 112 min.

Watch the Cinefamily original trailer!

The Haunting

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10/30 - 2PM
$12/free for members

Co-presented by Hangover Matinees and Friday Night Frights

Live set by DJ Mean Mr. Mustard

Inspired by Shirley Jackson’s 1959 novel The Haunting of Hill House, filmmaker Robert Wise and writer Nelson Gidding’s (I Want to Live!, The Andromeda Strain) take the traditional haunted house yarn and weave it into a profoundly disturbing portrayal of one woman’s mounting hysteria. Evidence of the power of pure suggestion, The Haunting creeps into our psyche without traditional horror tropes: no monsters, no ghosts, no gore, just production designer Elliot Scott’s (Labyrinth) claustrophobic, Rococo interiors, shot on an early 30mm anamorphic, wide-angle lens. Leaving viewers as confounded as the fragile Eleanor (Julie Harris), and focused as much on the confusion of physical interiors as the imbroglio that is our brittle mental interiority, this early entry in the House of Psychotic Women canon explores how, when we presume to invade a house, it might also invade us.

Dir. Robert Wise, 1963, 35mm, 112 min.

Sam Green & Yo La Tengo Live Score: The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller (Off-site at the Skirball)

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11/10 - 8PM
$50 GA, $75 VIP

Presented by Skirball Cultural Center

Experience “live documentary” with Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Sam Green and legendary indie rock band Yo La Tengo at this very special one-night only event in the Skirball’s intimate 300-seat Ahmanson Ballroom. The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller traces the career of twentieth-century futurist, architect, inventor, and author R. Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983). An early proponent of environmental stewardship, Fuller spoke persuasively about contemporary design and architecture’s ability to tackle issues of sustainability and conservation and to stimulate radical societal change. Green’s live narration is accompanied by Yo La Tengo performing their original score on stage.

“A singular experience, and a collective one, with the potential for human connection and human error.” – The New York Times

“…A movie being born as you see it and hear it, as alive as music.” – Rebecca Solnit

Advance Tickets for Cinefamily members only
$50 General Admission
$75 VIP Premium

As Cinefamily is a non-profit, we rely on the support of our donating 1-year “Black Card” members. Because we appreciate your support, we have one of the most generous member benefit plans around. Our members receive free admission to regular Cinefamily screenings, priority entry to free shows, and exclusive discount offers to special events such as this one.

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